View Full Version : i want to become a SIS/MI6 agent.


EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 07:05 PM
im going down to the MI6 HQ in london sometime in the next week or 2. i will be seeking employment there as i feel my training is going to waste.

i know most of you are laughing at me because of my spelling mistakes. but i think i am qualified for the position physicaly and mentaly.


this is not a joke, i am going to go down there and get a job one way or another,


wish me luck,


peace.

Baron Max
05-22-07, 07:23 PM
So, ....go ahead. Why are you telling us?

Baron Max

EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 07:25 PM
So, ....go ahead. Why are you telling us?

Baron Max


because i want some feedback. maybe some advice,


it could turn into a good discussion aswell.


whats wrong with posting it in free thoughts? its a serious topic to me and i realy want to get a job there.

peace

TruthSeeker
05-22-07, 07:26 PM
They wouldn't like to know you posted this here... :D

EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 07:40 PM
They wouldn't like to know you posted this here... :D


they wouldent mind, they would just say im some kind of nut who didnt get passed the secuity at the door, even if i was working with them, nobody would be any wiser.


for a secret agency they are pretty easy to find.

peace.

TruthSeeker
05-22-07, 07:45 PM
Doesn't sound so secret to me... LOL! :D

Carcano
05-22-07, 07:45 PM
as i feel my training is going to waste.
I wouldnt repeat that in the interview...they might think your signing on to kick ass! :D

phonetic
05-22-07, 08:17 PM
Good luck, mate. What kind of job are you hoping for?

I hear they do a lot of recruiting at uni's around the country.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 08:30 PM
Good luck, mate. What kind of job are you hoping for?

I hear they do a lot of recruiting at uni's around the country.


im interested in starting off as a network security specialist. im going to be applying for both MI5 and MI6 positions.

im going to go straight into the building to apply for work i know where they are. i was thinking of infiltrating the building just to show them i can.

peace.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 08:33 PM
once i apply for the job i will no longer be able to speak about it under any circumstances. i cannot talk about the application or the job once i have applied for it,


so if i suddenly just dont talk about it anymore after the next 2 weeks you know why.


peace.

phonetic
05-22-07, 08:34 PM
lol, alright. Not sure trying to infiltrate the place is a great idea, but whatever floats your boat.

Is that the line of work you're in just now? Take it you're qualified up with CompTIA Network+, Cisco certs and all that shit?

EmptyForceOfChi
05-22-07, 08:45 PM
i have SIA certificates. im not in that line of work at the moment though. i used to be a personal trainer, i still do self defence instruction. and am looking to get into either intel and espionage work, or working for the secret services.


peace.

Cortex_Colossus
05-22-07, 10:43 PM
So, ....go ahead. Why are you telling us?

Baron Max

Why shouldn't he tell us? This is an open forum for communication. The anonymity ensures that there is nothing to gain by running his feats by us unless he has some emotional connection to us and derives some personal emotional gain from anonymous feedback.

John99
05-22-07, 10:54 PM
im going down to the MI6 HQ in london sometime in the next week or 2. i will be seeking employment there as i feel my training is going to waste.

i know most of you are laughing at me because of my spelling mistakes. but i think i am qualified for the position physicaly and mentaly.


this is not a joke, i am going to go down there and get a job one way or another,


wish me luck,


peace.

Dont you need a degree?

vslayer
05-23-07, 01:35 AM
that would be the major barrier in my opinion. it seems that all of these government/corporate types require you to sit through 5 years of brainwashing before they will allow you access to their plutocracy.

John99
05-23-07, 01:44 AM
true, but they are cool jobs so it might be worth it.

redarmy11
05-23-07, 01:50 AM
lol, alright. Not sure trying to infiltrate the place is a great idea, but whatever floats your boat.
On the contrary, trying to infiltrate the place would be a brilliant idea. Failing the mission not so, but to be sat in Jonathan Evans (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/6625807.stm)'s chair, smiling mysteriously, when he walks into his office in the morning would virtually guarantee you the job, I think, probably. Scope out all the possible access points and go for it.

It would probably be a good idea to attack him when he walks in, too - just to see how on the ball he is.

phonetic
05-23-07, 02:14 AM
On the contrary, trying to infiltrate the place would be a brilliant idea. Failing the mission not so, but to be sat in Jonathan Evans (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/6625807.stm)'s chair, smiling mysteriously, when he walks into his office in the morning would virtually guarantee you the job, I think, probably. Scope out all the possible access points and go for it.

It would probably be a good idea to attack him when he walks in, too - just to see how on the ball he is.

True. They'd have to give you a job if you could manage it.

If you do go for it, Chi, I'd strongly suggest you don't take a backpack and you only wear tight fitting clothing with nothing bulging.

I don't want to hear any penis jokes.

It would be kind of funny to hear about somebody getting shot at their HQ, but it wouldn't if I'd said the person should do it. :D

redarmy11
05-23-07, 02:59 AM
As usual, chi, phonetic is talking out of his arse. A backpack is a must. Shouting "I've got a bomb!" would be especially good fun - a way to really test their mettle.

phonetic
05-23-07, 03:04 AM
You could try to park your car in their lobby. Obviously, in these situations you want to make an entrance. Not just an entrance, but an entrance, entrance. Ideally you should be doing 30+mph and do a handbrake turn once you're inside.

redarmy11
05-23-07, 03:14 AM
Once inside, it's then move... and fire! Move... and fire! Try to get a clean headshot if you can but, if that isn't possible, you really want to be putting as many rounds into them as you can so that, when they go down, they stay down.

phonetic
05-23-07, 03:18 AM
Whilst you're down, behind a desk or something, pop your head up and fire some slugs into the petrol tank of your motor.

redarmy11
05-23-07, 03:48 AM
Here's some more info which will help you. This is a dynamic movement technique which we like to call slicing the pie - or 'pieing' for short. This is basic stuff. You should already know this, as it can mean the difference between a successful outcome and ignominious demise in the kind of tactical assault scenario that you're about to undertake. Pay close attention (I take your brain to another dimension):


http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?id=32250&siteSection=21

Slicing the pie, or "pie-ing," is a method of looking around corners and obstacles while presenting the smallest possible target. It is a dynamic movement technique designed to minimize exposure around cover and maximize the tactical advantage for the officer.

Nearly anyone who has completed "Police School 101" has some familiarity with pie slicing. It is named after the shape of the officer's reward for tactical movement. As the officer moves tactically, he receives a bigger slice of the pie.

Slicing is a fluid dynamic method. As the unpredictable elements change, the officer's responses change. For example, a door can be attached by several different configurations causing it to open at least five different ways: toward the officer, away from the officer, toward the officer in the same room, away from the officer in the same room and sliding. The way a door opens and whether it is open will cause the officer to respond in a distinct manner.

It takes at least two officers to slice a stairway, regardless of the architecture. If the stairway takes a turn, one officer will have to negotiate it backwards, eyes on the landing. Even when ascending a simple stairway, one officer must slice the entrance to the stairway, the other the landing.

Making the tactical decision
All tactical decision making is time sensitive. A high-risk situation is governed by responses to actions that each adversary makes. If the suspect does something, the officer makes a decision based on this action and surrounding factors. The quicker the decision response cycle, the quicker the reaction time.

This concept is not new. It is attributed to Air Force Col. John Boyd. An outspoken military pilot, Boyd observed that tactical decision making had a cycle of processes. The process of observe, orient, decide and act occur in a cycle - the OODA Loop. The adversary who completes the OODA Loop the quickest will win.

In the 1950s, Boyd bet other pilots that he could put his jet on their tail within 40 seconds or pay them $40. Legend has it that he never lost his $40. Boyd's instinctive concepts of combat were the foundation for combat decision-making processes employed by almost every great leader.

One of the tenets of the OODA Loop is exploiting surprise. The winning officer will increase the duration of the orient phase of the suspect's OODA Loop when slicing the pie. The idea is to cause the suspect to delay his perception and misread the environment. If the suspect's information is incomplete, decision making is delayed. The longer the delay, the greater the officer safety.

While introducing confusion in the suspect's OODA Loop, the officer shortcuts his own loop the same way a race car driver apexes a corner for more speed. The officer has a series of templates for each scenario. If the template works, he can quickly apply them, decreasing his response time. The templates come from training. For pie slicing, every search an officer performs reshapes the library of templates.

As officers begin obtaining better templates, they realize the concepts of pie slicing also can be used in situations like vehicle stops.

Preparing to train
For this article several scenarios were experimented with where officers searched inside a building. The purpose was to clearly illustrate using geometry as a tactical advantage. The Airsoft pistol from 21st Century Airsoft and a Raidhouse were two training aids used that significantly improved data collection on slicing the pie.

The Airsoft pistol is a tool that adds realism to training, incorporating the same operating system, trigger action, dimensions, disassembly and "feel" of a Glock 22. Additionally, it fit the same holsters and equipment one would use on patrol. Using full face protection and appropriate clothing, the Airsoft pistol allowed officers to run scenarios that included realistic force decisions.

The Raidhouse, a portable tactical training system, consists of a steel-framed enclosure with coated vinyl walls. Quickly erected, users attach removable walls on the net ceiling. This allows for an infinite variety of configurations, including hallways, doorways and rooms. The interior can be reconfigured in seconds, making the next scenario distinct from the previous one.

Using the training tools and collecting data from experienced officers, the Law Enforcement Technology Test Team was able to compile a list of recommendations for training in pie slicing.

If moving sideways is working, avoid the temptation to move forward
One of the biggest mistakes an officer will make is moving forward too quickly while he can still be moving laterally. In training, the easiest way to recognize this error is to watch officers shuffle right to a doorway, slice the interior, then move forward to the point where there muzzle is beyond the barricade. Even experienced officers occasionally let their muzzle go beyond a wall, then realize that anyone on the other side of the wall could grab it.

Using the Raidhouse, several search scenarios where the primary officer hugged the wall on the same side as a doorway were utilized. It was found that the suspect was able to grab the weapon almost every time. Even in training, this forced the hand of the officer. When this scenario was run with a carbine, the suspect was able to grab the rifle with both hands every time. This also forced the officer to resort to the handgun. Obviously, leading with the weapon demonstrates a serious training deficiency.

On a hallway with doors on both sides, the two-man officer team will generally move in a staggered formation to the first doorway. The lead officer will move in a question mark shaped pattern with the opening of the hook facing the doorway. When the lead officer has sufficiently sliced the doorway, the two officers will switch positions. There is no hard and fast rule in this situation - a collection of officer safety habits will work. A little bit of experimenting will show any officer the fact that backing off from a doorway allows a better field of view while slicing.

In an ideal world, officers will have their backs against the opposite wall of a hallway when slicing a doorway. In the Raidhouse, the closer an officer stayed to a doorway opening, the more likely the gun was grabbed. As officers sliced from the opposite wall, the reactionary advantage was maximized.

There has to be a fluid switch from contact to cover between two officers. In a hallway with several doorways, one officer has to look down the hall while the other slices an open doorway. This action immediately implies that they will have to leapfrog to the next doorway. However, if one of them has a long gun, the officer who can holster his weapon becomes the handcuffing officer by default.

The recommended way to train for fluid role switching is for training managers to have squads train together.

No safe assumptions
Assume the worst case scenario - the suspect can see you. Do not assume the suspect will stay put when discovered. Do not assume the suspect will stay put at all.

The number of scenario possibilities is countless. However, the earlier the officer can identify a threat by correctly slicing, the more complete and effective his action. If the suspect rushes the officer, slicing the pie will give the officer more time to react.

When searching, it is a safe assumption the suspect knows someone is looking for him. It is also safe to assume the suspect can detect someone entering a residence. The sensory clues could be something as simple as the rush of air when a door opens. One can even assume a suspect can hear an officer moving down a hallway. Despite all this, slicing the pie gives the officer a tactical advantage. A suspect or suspects might know the general area of the search but probably cannot fix the position of any of the officers. Even if they could, the tactically savvy officer is behind cover when he makes his observations.

When using the Raidhouse, it was easy to guess the location of the searching officer every time. After all, the walls are made of coated vinyl and the ceiling is a net. Even with these disadvantages, the officer who sliced the pie correctly always won, because he acquired a visual target by careful, deliberate movements. This is the most important data.

Think in three dimensions
One southern California agency was given some abandoned apartments for training. A nearby agency provided the actors for the scenarios. During one scenario, officers were told they were responding to an unknown call for help inside of an apartment complex. Four officers performed the search. As they moved down a hallway, they heard a female voice crying for help, saying, "He's got a knife! He's going to stab me!" From the screaming they were easily able to find the correct apartment. They paused outside of the apartment door, which was halfway open. The officers decided to rush in the apartment and overtake the suspect. There were two surprises beyond the door. First, the "victim" shot the first two officers with a "red gun." Second, the "victim" was squatted on top of a refrigerator, not where most people would assume the threat would come from.

This training scenario yielded several lessons. Never assume that the suspect is flat-footed. When slicing, look at the whole picture that unfolds, not just the one at chest level. Apply the correct template to the correct scenario. In this case, a deliberate look inside the apartment or a little intel would have been handy.

Consider alternative tools
Slicing the pie is only part of the equation. Another element that needs to be included is the common sense approach. The officer may have done everything right and sees where the suspect is hiding. Now it is time to use the correct tool. For example, if the suspect responds to verbal commands, there is no reason to move forward. If verbal commands are not working but canine use is appropriate, use the canine.

Other considerations - whether to enter a room, whether it will take both officers to clear a room - depend on how much officers can see when inspecting the room from the hallway, vision obscurements and the size of the search.

External slicing
Slicing is just as appropriate outside the building. When walking up to a call, every officer has the radar on, spotting potential hazards and cover along the way. Officers naturally place cover between where they are and where they are going. This is best trained by putting a threat target downrange during live-fire training and having officers walk up to a barricade. They will naturally orient to "this side toward enemy" and gravitate toward the barricade. The other part of this training is officers learn to back off a little from the barricade so their muzzle is not exposed.

Another important aspect of barricade training is when the tactical situation requires the officer to slice from the reaction- (or support) hand side. They should train to do one of two things: put the weapon in the support hand or place the non-firing hand on the chest, depending on the orientation of the threat. Either way, the mission is minimum exposure.

No master key, only a large key ring
The only way to make an officer and his team successful in pie slicing is to train, train, train. No single scenario or application will work in every situation. In a very short time, officers on a shift can become a cohesive unit. As they compare their notes with other officers from other agencies, they find that pie slicing is a universal language.

The Flemster
05-23-07, 04:01 AM
There was a program on BBC2 about a year ago following 6 members of the public's attempts to complete the MI6 training.
It looked pretty straightforward (although the dingbats they used for the show really were as thick as fuck. Good telly, I s'pose...) and seemed quite easy to apply.

Give it a shot.
Just don't tell em your Sciforums name.

phlogistician
05-23-07, 04:07 AM
im going down to the MI6 HQ in london sometime in the next week or 2. i will be seeking employment there as i feel my training is going to waste.


If you got a degree you could join the Civil Service and opt for a posting to one of the Intelligence agencies.

I don't think your SIA qualification as pub doorman is going to cut it with MI6 however.

Apply for an application and vetting form. You'll have to tell huge lies to get past the first round of vetting, and then get told 'no thanks' when they find out more about you. But hey, it's your time you are wasting.

phonetic
05-23-07, 04:15 AM
You could try to get a gig as a paid informant.

I'm not sure you'd get paid before you came up with anything good or that they wouldn't realise you were taking the piss, but it's worth a bash.

You could pick some new terrorists out for HM's finest to harass in the early hours. The brown ones are getting a little boring.

phlogistician
05-23-07, 05:06 AM
You could pick some new terrorists out for HM's finest to harass in the early hours.

Yeah, how about Russian drug dealers?

Exploradora
05-23-07, 06:11 AM
I believe those secret government agencies come to you, not the other way around.

Oli
05-23-07, 06:19 AM
Not true: Six (or was it Five, I can't remember which) had a national recruitment drive a year or two back - newspaper adverts and everything;

Five
http://www.get.hobsons.co.uk/profile/2808/mi5_(the_security_service)

Six
http://www.prospects.ac.uk/cms/ShowPage/Home_page/Find_graduate_employers/p!emgfk?mode=displayprofile&adno=17455&from=D#p2

Of course you have to bear in mind that going and killing bad guys is NOT something they do - most of it is desk work and paper-pushing.
Good analysts are worth their weight in gold, hence the degree requirement.

phlogistician
05-23-07, 06:35 AM
Not true: Six (or was it Five, I can't remember which) had a national recruitment drive a year or two back - newspaper adverts and everything;



Yeah, I sent off for an application form, but to be honest, in the role I was looking at, the money was pretty poor.

tablariddim
05-23-07, 07:07 AM
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draqon
05-23-07, 07:09 AM
im going down to the MI6 HQ in london sometime in the next week or 2. i will be seeking employment there as i feel my training is going to waste.

i know most of you are laughing at me because of my spelling mistakes. but i think i am qualified for the position physicaly and mentaly.


this is not a joke, i am going to go down there and get a job one way or another,


wish me luck,


peace.

the fact that you told us this already means you are not qualified.

tablariddim
05-23-07, 07:12 AM
He'd better delete his posts in this thread and change his computer, hard disk and ISP, and it would help if he never mentioned it on his application.

spuriousmonkey
05-23-07, 07:17 AM
I applied for the CIA.

And I can't think of a punchline to that.

nietzschefan
05-23-07, 08:10 AM
CSIS and CSA hires straight from school sometimes from certain "bloodlines", I can't imagine it being much different with Mi5/6. I suspect someone like yourself is going to have to work your way up through royal marines, SAS or commandos(and qualifying for those will be tough) before you could apply for Mi5/6.

Nickelodeon
05-23-07, 08:11 AM
Learn Arabic, they are in demand in the intelligence services.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-23-07, 08:33 AM
lol seriously redarmy and phonetic that was some funny shit i couldent stop laughing.

if i was a handicapped arabic speaking woman, that would pretty much garantee me the position. i have a basic grasp of mandarin japanese and korean. that will help me slightly.

sadly being able to kick some ass in hand 2 hand combat doesent count for much these days. nor does my weapons training.

within the MI6/SIS you have to be well qualified and hold degrees for certain positions. but within the MI5 there are positions without desk work (minimal)

i would be going for the netword security specialist position, or something simular.



i had to edit what i just posted because of something.


peace.

phlogistician
05-24-07, 05:04 AM
i have a basic grasp of mandarin japanese .

BULLSHIT ALERT!

Dude, 'Mandarin' is a language spoken in China.

Oli
05-24-07, 05:16 AM
On the other hand it COULD be a missing comma...

mandarin, japanese and korean. Hmmm?

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 06:03 AM
BULLSHIT ALERT!

Dude, 'Mandarin' is a language spoken in China.

yeah why not quote it out of context to make me look like a fool. why did you do that man?


i said i have a grasp of mandarin japanese and korean,

as in 3 different languages.

peace.

phlogistician
05-24-07, 07:14 AM
yeah why not quote it out of context to make me look like a fool. why did you do that man?

Because you are a fool?


i said i have a grasp of mandarin japanese and korean,

as in 3 different languages.



No, that's two languages, Korean, and one you invented, 'mandarin japanese', without the comma, 'mandarin' become becomes the adjective to 'japanese'.

You claim prowess in other languages but can't even express yourself in English.

phlogistician
05-24-07, 07:17 AM
On the other hand it COULD be a missing comma...

mandarin, japanese and korean. Hmmm?

Yeah, but it's funnier to call BULLSHIT on Chi. He can't even write in English, so he's never going to master Kanji!

Oli
05-24-07, 07:30 AM
Apparently the Japanese have a much smaller incidence of dyslexia than those using the roman alphabet...
But yeah... Chi baby, bullshit!
Peace.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:34 AM
Yeah, but it's funnier to call BULLSHIT on Chi. He can't even write in English, so he's never going to master Kanji!

yeah this is true, im very bad at writting kanji and kokugi. but oraly i can speak quite well.

im learning korean at the moment, damn stupid circles and squares.

peace.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:35 AM
Apparently the Japanese have a much smaller incidence of dyslexia than those using the roman alphabet...
But yeah... Chi baby, bullshit!
Peace.

your just jelous because you want to be a cool spy mother fucker like me, i will 99% most likely fail and get shot or something though.

but yeah screw you! :)


peace.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:36 AM
Because you are a fool?



No, that's two languages, Korean, and one you invented, 'mandarin japanese', without the comma, 'mandarin' become becomes the adjective to 'japanese'.

You claim prowess in other languages but can't even express yourself in English.

so i missed out a comma big deal, english is my second language. pointing and shouting like a caveman is my first.

peace.

Oli
05-24-07, 07:36 AM
Nah, most "spies" die of boredom or old age.
I asked a GRU guy once.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:38 AM
Nah, most "spies" die of boredom or old age.
I asked a GRU guy once.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/GRU_emblem.svg/200px-

Oli
05-24-07, 07:40 AM
Glavnoye Razveditvatelnoye Upravleniye - that's the one... :)
But the badge is "Voenna'ya" - probably more Spetsnaz than GRU proper.

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:41 AM
yeah even though i have some russian blood in me i dont understand what you just wrote :)


peace.

Oli
05-24-07, 07:51 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GRU

Main Intelligence Directorate - military-run and targeted intelligence as opposed to KGB (now FSB) which was civilian-directed and run.
I had a chat with two of their guys about 20 years ago. Surly buggers. :)

EmptyForceOfChi
05-24-07, 07:57 AM
have met with ex members before, my uncle who is an ex s.a.s member trains in systemma with alot of russian military guys, i enjoy training with them, its no walk in the park though i got slapped around a bit at first.

peace.

Blue_UK
05-24-07, 11:26 AM
Highly bad idea to post about it!

Do you have the mental capacity to not talk about things even though they're really interesting and very gossipy? Sanctity of information is much harder than you'd think.

Also, those boys don't want martial arts etc. They use people who can analyse data. If you want to do anything like recon then you'll need to be less than 5'11" or so.

Lastly, the number of applicants to places is very high.


im going down to the MI6 HQ in london sometime in the next week or 2. i will be seeking employment there as i feel my training is going to waste.

i know most of you are laughing at me because of my spelling mistakes. but i think i am qualified for the position physicaly and mentaly.


this is not a joke, i am going to go down there and get a job one way or another,


wish me luck,


peace.

weed_eater_guy
05-24-07, 02:06 PM
Hey, since you're posting your intentions already, why don't you keep us posted on your secret missions and such! It'll be fun!

Or, if you'd like to actually get hired, STOP TALKING ABOUT IT. Duh!

Ghost_007
05-24-07, 03:17 PM
I know one guy that works for MI5. Only a few people know about it though. He tells everyone else that he works in a *********. It was very difficult to get the job though, the testing was very tough.

There was a story a year back about some mateys trying to blow up some planes going from the UK to America. This guy was given the computers of the mateys, his team had to go through them.

Stryder
05-24-07, 03:20 PM
There was a program on BBC2 about a year ago following 6 members of the public's attempts to complete the MI6 training.
It looked pretty straightforward (although the dingbats they used for the show really were as thick as fuck. Good telly, I s'pose...) and seemed quite easy to apply.

Give it a shot.
Just don't tell em your Sciforums name.

Believe me they already know it.


I believe those secret government agencies come to you, not the other way around.

Thats dependent on what you are up to in life, namely what you've been doing ;)

darksidZz
05-24-07, 03:21 PM
This is madness, they will not hire him, they won't even hire me and I'm god.

Stryder
05-24-07, 03:24 PM
This is madness, they will not hire him, they won't even hire me and I'm god.

Technically Dark, you've revealed too much information about your psychology and in their profession they really can't be dealing with people and psychological issues since they are a liability. No offense meant.

Tyler
05-25-07, 12:23 AM
Alright, ace, here's the first piece of advice you should hear if you intend to join a department like MI6 or anything of that nature...

Don't talk about it on the fuckin' internet.

If you apply, if they grant you an interview, if you get past the first round of testing and if you make it into the pile of those being considered for the job out of all the many applications coming from Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, etc...

They will do a complete and total background check on you. The British agency are established, modernizing and efficient (to a degree, relative to CIA/CSIS/DGSE...) and will most certainly check everything you've said on the internet as far back as they can. This will be very easy for them to find. And they will not at all be impressed by you bragging about it (which is essentially what this is) to a random internet site.

Their number one concern when performing a background check is that you will be of the personality to not reveal a single note about what you've done. This will indicate to them that you aren't ready.

The second concern will be that you are the type of personality to excel at covert and thurough investigations. This post will make you seem abnormal, extroverted and amateurish. As well, it will be painfully obvious you are not nearly as serious about the matter as 99% of their applicants.

I'm sorry if this seems harsh, but if you have any hope of joining a department like MI6 you should know these things. It's a wonderful career, but only if you're the right type of person. There's your heads up.

phlogistician
05-25-07, 04:23 AM
It's a wonderful career, but only if you're the right type of person. There's your heads up.

I don't think Chi understands that you don't go knocking on MI6 headquarters door, and ask for a job. I also don't think he realises that they employ multilingual graduates with IQs of 170+ for the cool jobs.

Only just being a genius who speaks some French, I was interested in an IT role with 5, but for London, the money was disappointing. I guess you have to want to work them, it's no gravy train.

Tyler
05-25-07, 11:44 AM
Actually, knocking right on their door isn't such a poor idea. Typically they prefer these things handled by email or some other mode of communication they have set up, but it's not much different than just saying "I want a job". Yes they recruit from schools, but they also tend to need and want applicants. And for the record, not everyone at these departments is a total genius. In fact, many will tell you that personality type is as important as intellectual capacity. They need 'muscle' and guys to do the dirty jobs (no, this doesn't mean what you think, chi) as much as they need high-level analysts.

As for the 'cool jobs' (where you get to do the John LeCarre shit); those come after years of service in much more boring jobs.

But yeah, it really is no gravy train. However, your ship can come in if you switch to private securities companies after a number of years of civil service. Or so I hear.