i.e. vs. e.g.

wegs

Matter and Pixie Dust
Valued Senior Member
A friend of mine was telling me the correct usage of this earlier, and I was surprised to know that I've been using this incorrectly for quite some time! I tend to use these interchangeably, but that is wrong.

''i.e.'' = that is or in other words

''e.g.'' = for example

If you've made the same mistake, you're not alone. :oops:
 
A friend of mine was telling me the correct usage of this earlier, and I was surprised to know that I've been using this incorrectly for quite some time! I tend to use these interchangeably, but that is wrong.

''i.e.'' = that is or in other words

''e.g.'' = for example

If you've made the same mistake, you're not alone. :oops:
I never use "e.g." but I can see how you could use "i.e." for both in some cases and still be correct. Sometimes you use it for "in other words" and sometimes you use it when you use an example for other words.
 
I never use "e.g." but I can see how you could use "i.e." for both in some cases and still be correct. Sometimes you use it for "in other words" and sometimes you use it when you use an example for other words.

Well actually, ''i.e.'' is supposed to be used when rephrasing a particular statement in order to make it clearer, and ''e.g.'' is to be used for listing examples. ''i.e.'' really shouldn't be used when listing examples of something, if we want to be precise about it. :)
 
I never use "e.g." but I can see how you could use "i.e." for both in some cases and still be correct. Sometimes you use it for "in other words" and sometimes you use it when you use an example for other words.

I must say I had always considered these abbreviations mutually exclusive. I do not see how an example of something can also be something just restated in different words. So I'm with wegs on this.

Incidentally, as no one seems to mentioned it so far "i.e." is from the Latin "id est", which means "that is", while e.g. comes from "exempli gratia", which is a bit more complicated to understand in translation but means something like "for the sake of example".
 
I must say I had always considered these abbreviations mutually exclusive. I do not see how an example of something can also be something just restated in different words. So I'm with wegs on this.

Incidentally, as no one seems to mentioned it so far "i.e." is from the Latin "id est", which means "that is", while e.g. comes from "exempli gratia", which is a bit more complicated to understand in translation but means something like "for the sake of example".
Another example of a word for rock, i.e. stone is stone. :)
 
Between a rock and a hard place, you are. Or a stone. :wink: lol
 
I see that none of you scholars bothered to find out what words "e.g." and "i.e." are abbreviations for!

I.e. is the Latin abbreviation for id est, which is a similar phrase to English "that is."

E.g., on the other hand, is the Latin abbreviation for exempli gratia, which means, more or less, "here's an example."
 
I see that none of you scholars bothered to find out what words "e.g." and "i.e." are abbreviations for!

I.e. is the Latin abbreviation for id est, which is a similar phrase to English "that is."

E.g., on the other hand, is the Latin abbreviation for exempli gratia, which means, more or less, "here's an example."

exchemist bothered :)
 
I see that none of you scholars bothered to find out what words "e.g." and "i.e." are abbreviations for!

I.e. is the Latin abbreviation for id est, which is a similar phrase to English "that is."

E.g., on the other hand, is the Latin abbreviation for exempli gratia, which means, more or less, "here's an example."

I see you did not bother to read the thread before responding, arf, arf. :D
 
The mnemonic I always used (which I made up myself and so may not make much sense to others) is to think of i.e. as "in effect" and then e.g. is an eggsample... I know, but it works for me :)
Many years ago a teacher told us that e.g. does NOT mean "example given" - but it is a good way to remember what it means.
 
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