Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    I think it can only mean a reduction in the number of students. That, or it's meaningless jargon.
     
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  3. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    "Attrition," in general, means that the quantity of some commodity is slowly shrinking. "Student attrition," therefore, means that the number of students is smaller than it used to be.
     
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  5. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Would "student number attrition" be a better turn of phrase or am I being pedantic?

    I seem to remember our teachers used to threaten physical activity towards us on occasion.That might have led to "rubbing us out" ,as the Greek root of the word might imply

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    http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Question4143.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
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  7. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    No, you are not being pedantic, you are promoting clear English!

    Can you give me the Greek verb from which the Latin "atterere" is derived?

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  8. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Let's not let the facts get in the way of a good story

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  9. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    It seems ,according to some Chantraine bloke that the two words "terere" (pp tritum )and "tribein" may be related after all.

    http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/is-attrition-derived-from-the-greek-word-tribein.28179/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Chantraine
     
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  10. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    Chantraine is a heavyweight, so his opinion matters, so it's a possible although rather tenuous connection. If you had actually mentioned τρίβω I would not have asked, but it did not occur to me.

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    At least the exercise has helped me learn a new word: a tribade is a woman who "practises unnatural vice with other women" (OED) Wow!
     
  11. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    No. That would confuse people. The concept of attrition includes a reduction in size, volume, count, or some other reasonably straightforward measure.
     
  12. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    They should really stick to the natural vices.
    I did not realize that "student attrition" is a set expression . I had never come across it before.

    https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/enhancement/definitions/student-attrition
     
  13. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Learn by rote : is traditional education method?
     
  14. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, it is the method of learning by repetition and memory rather than necessarily requiring understanding.
     
  15. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    169
    Yes, but usually applied to basic things where understanding is not really an issue, such as multiplication tables and conjugation of verbs .
     
  16. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Every year I have to pay for my golf club membership fee/fees.

    fee or fees?
     
  17. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    A fee is a payment made for a service, so if there is just one payment to one place then it is "fee", otherwise "fees". But in everyday speaking they are used almost interchangeably and everyone will know what is meant.
     
  18. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    communique is derived from communication ?
     
  19. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    Surprisingly, yes, but it is French and needs an accent: communiqué
     
  20. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    The French verb communiquer means "to communicate." Communiqué is the past participle, so it refers to something that has already been communicated.
     
  21. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    outpatient = a patient who receives medical treatment without being admitted to a hospital.

    If you are admitted to hospital, is it called inpatient?
     
  22. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Chiropractors focus on the intimate relationship between the nervous system and spine, and hold true the following beliefs:

    • Biomechanical and structural derangement of the spine can affect the nervous system
    • For many conditions, chiropractic treatment can restore the structural integrity of the spine, reduce pressure on the sensitive neurological tissue, and consequently improve the health of the individual.

    Is this word the combination of Chiro + practor ?
    Doing surgery on your spinal cord is chiropractor?
     
  23. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    169
    Chiropractic is a word invented around 1900 for this alternative (=crap) treatment, from the Greek cheir = hand and prattein= to do. Doing stuff with your hands.
     

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