Words that make you vomit when used on Sciforums

Discussion in 'About the Members' started by spuriousmonkey, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. one_raven God is a Chinese Whisper Valued Senior Member

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    I know what you are saying, and I mostly agree with you, but I couldn't help but wonder if you are going to change your name from Dr Lou natic to Dr Doolittle.

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  3. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    It's, "Y'all." Short for you all.
     
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  5. chunkylover58 Make it a ... CHEEEESEburger Registered Senior Member

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    "UFO" as being a synonym for alien spacecraft. A UFO is what it says, "Unidentified Flying Object" - anything. If one wants to imply that something is ET, just go ahead and say, "I think I saw an alien spacecraft." If one says, "I saw a UFO", I think, "Unidentified" and, therefore, irrelevant until identified.
     
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  7. spuriousmonkey Banned Banned

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    Let me add:

    missing link
     
  8. Bells Staff Member

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    aaaaaaarrrrrrgggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!

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    Tiassa, I detest it. Why can't they say 'you all'? Does it take that much effort?

    And thanks for correcting the typo. And yes I am aware of what it stands for.

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    I had this girl from Atlanta in one of my classes a couple of years ago and she'd always say it. And then one day after a 45 minute presentation she asked me a question and said the dreaded word... 'y'all'. I broke the pencil that was in my hand and she never asked me a question since with the term 'y'all' in it. Class was a bit more pleasant after that

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    .

    And spurious.. lol, the one I want to add to my list is creation and creationism... grrrrrrrr!!
     
  9. Kunax Sciforums:Reality not required Registered Senior Member

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    George Bush the well know terrorist and fundamentalist, praises his god high before him and all others. But he still bows down to his isrealie masters. Is there tainted version of Judaism better then his god?

    After September 11 George Bush has been trying to create a theocracy in the united states, ralling strong allies to his side, both politically and religiously.
    He even manage lured the amerika people in to a trap of fake patroism and love of country, allowing him to start a campain of Terrorism acrosse the globe. Still there a some that protest and tries to stop his campain of hate and death, But they are few and far between, there voices go unheard, there appeal to authority often futile and wasted.

    The scattered few, that have manage to find the missing link and penetrate the walls of paper, have been push back by the cognitive surrender and Ad hom of those in power.

    Y'all should move to Europa, to places like France a historically ancient country, and where secularism seems to be on top of the agenda, or Belgium which has on more then 1 occation, scrabbled figther to intercept UFO.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2004
  10. chunkylover58 Make it a ... CHEEEESEburger Registered Senior Member

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    Oh .... "it's" when "its" is intended. "It's" is a contraction of "it is (was, has)".... "its" is possessive form of it.

    "Its only problem is that it's broken."
     
  11. Undecided Banned Banned

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    I really hate the term wOOt, I cannot stand that term. Behoove, that's pretty gay, ehm... and when words are used out of context! Oh man, that is so annoying. I hate it when ppl TRY to sound smart by looking at the thesaurus and using a synonym that simply doesn’t fit. I also despise the mis-use of logical fallacies.
     
  12. whitewolf asleep under the juniper bush Registered Senior Member

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    Oh you know what word I hate, in general?
    MARRIAGE
    whoever says it has to be tortured by Xev's methods and worse..... ggrrrawrrrrrr
     
  13. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    35,597
    Because contracting words and phrases is part of the American experience. I used to detest the term as well, but a yachting joke (How do you tell a sailor from the South? He sails a yawl.) and the busting of a myth for me eliminated my objection.

    I used to think it was just a southern thing. And then I realized it was also an "old west" thing. And then I caught it in New England in literature, and while it would be a couple years before I started using the word at all, the New England example, along side the affirmative "Ayuh," eventually stuck with me. What finally crammed it into my lexicon was force of habit, as I discovered that "Y'all territory" is almost anywhere outside metropolitan and suburban areas, and also in poor urban communities.

    Although I will amend my prior statement about words and strings of words.

    • "Transition" is not a verb. You can lasso with a lasso, but you don't lariat with a lariat, and you transfer, not transition something from one condition to another. (Origin: Apparently white-collar, as in, After we get the files into boxes, we need to transition the whole lot to Chicago.)

    This is the first example. To be honest, my time away from insurance companies has finally started to erase that list of dreaded words. I call them "marketspeak," referring to marketing departments across the country that constantly "transition" cheap advertising trinkets, catalogs, and even conventioners around the world.

    I've mulled writing a novel about it, but I haven't a story to go with it. But I was thinking, at one point, of writing a completely pointless novel with no real moral dilemmas, and merely document a futuristic day in the life of a bureaucrat. What set me on it was hearing someone stop speaking amid a sentence so that the last syllables I heard were "passenge." So of course I mutated that fragment of sound into the idea of simply making up new words and writing the story. "Joe, could you ledge me passenge to India? (Translation: Joe, could you book me a plane ticket to India?)

    My thing with "Y'all" is a split. I don't actually like saying, "Hey, y'all," in my best Maycomb voice, but "y'all" works well rhythmically if you're addressing a group:

    • I thought I'd take the lot of you out for a drink as a reward for your hard work.
    • I thought y'all might need a drink.

    But, anyway, if you work around a standard, cubicle-farm corporate bureaucracy, listen in on what people are saying. We nod and say we understand and even do, but if you were to record it and transcribe it into a literary dialogue, most of the time a reader can't follow the transitions within the discussion. And when you see how many fake words people use--often to save less than a syllable's speech--it really does make the fact that humans get along at all that much more appreciable.

    But how do you feel, inasmuch as you don't like "Y'all," about--

    • 'Sup (What's up?)
    • Aid'no (I dont' know)
    • Axe (ask)

    --and other symptomatic enunciations of dynamic compression in language?

    Beyond that, one of my peeves is when people consistently screw up non-American names. Understandably, there are some names English-speakers have difficulty with; nobody's perfect, so it's not about botching someone's name when you meet them. But I think of a guy who called or calls games for the New York Yankees. Look, whatever. If Jorge wants to be called George, that's fine; my partner used to know a Jorge/George--he likes "George," she said, but failed to mention that he tolerated it, and was happy to be accepted by his peers even if they refused to pronounce his name correctly. So yeah, even a baseball commentator can miss it. But the guy's name is Posada, not Posedo. In Seattle, a fan apparently got so outraged by a dialogue with the Mariners' organization that she actually sent them a tilde. Which sucks because even though they could never write Raul Ibañez's name correctly, they were happy to write "Ichiro" and "Kazuhiro Sasaki" in Japanese on the TV screen. After going through the I-buh-Nez vs. Ee-BAH-nyez battle with the team, she measured and cut several blue felt tildes and sent them to Raul Ibañez. Shortly thereafter, the Mariners started including the tilde on the screen, and a couple of announcers actually got it right. And how's that for racism? How many Japanese players in the Majors? How many from the Hispanic umbrella? And yet announcers would rush to nail "Ichiro" and "Sasaki" correctly. Suh-ZOO-kee finally became Soo-SOO-kee, which is closer to how I hear Japanese folks say it, and the announcers went with "Kazu" because they couldn't figure the difference between Kah-zoo-HEAR-oh and Kuh-ZOO-aroh.

    Also, I'm aware that if I cross the pond to Her Majesty's lands, I'll go nuts. A friend of mine would come back from England and make a point of using British euphemism. It's not that he was incomprehensible, but that they're really stupid words. It looks stupid in an e-mail, and sounds ridiculous coming off his tongue.

    Okay, I'll stop babbling.
     
  14. Bells Staff Member

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    22,817
    'Sup when used usually makes me want to rip out the speaker's vocal cords.

    Aid'no I've rarely heard used but 'I dunno' usually has me squinting my eyes to slits, but I usually count to 10 and let it go.

    Axe I've found has usually been something in the problem of pronounciation.


    We all use compressed versions of certain words in all languages, but some expressions just rub me the wrong way. I don't know why. " 'Sup" for example has now become so common that it is now rare to hear anyone say 'what's up?'. All that is usually said instead now is 'Sup' or 'wassup', and each time it's said to me, I honestly wish that I could either rip out their vocal cords or make them write 'what's up?' 1000 times.

    I know what you mean. My first name is actually Marie-Claire. It's one of those names that has been in my family for generations and unfortunately for me, for my generation, I'm the one with the burden. However, I've found that I have to use my middle name as I've had so many people pronounce my name as 'Marie-Claa-rey'. How they can actually pronounce Claire as 'Claa-rey' is beyond me. Claire is a common name, but because it has the Marie as well and it's a French name, people just can't read it and pronounce it properly. At one stage I was telling people to just call me Marie, but that ended up as their seeing Marie as being Mary

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    which are two totally different names and pronounced differently. So in the end I ended up just going by my middle name which is easily understood and pronounced.
     
  15. Kunax Sciforums:Reality not required Registered Senior Member

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    My lastname can be spelled in 3 different ways and still sound the same, I ofcause have 1 of the lesser used ways, so when i tell someone my lastname, and they need to write it down for some use, I alwasy spell it for them.
    It does not bother me much anymore as it has become a reflex thou.

    I have often seen people from the "correct gramma or die" group complain about the use of it's/its and general placment of '.
    But i dont see the problem, when reading chunkylover58 line: Its only problem is that it's broken. the outcome is the same to me with or without ', perhaps its because my writen english is so bad, and im there for more used to compensate for errors when reading, but that only lead me to belive that people with english as primary should be able to read over the errors, and understand the general msg far better.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  16. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

    Messages:
    35,597
    Hell, my family name is made up. (My great-great-grandfather, I think, upon arriving in the area from ... well, at some point Norway, found there to be too many Petersens for his taste, so he made up a simple name, seven letters, that sounds English.)

    To this day, nobody can spell it, and few can pronounce it. One of my father's friends for ... thirty years ... still can't manage to say it right.

    So maybe I'm being too hard on people in general about non-American names, but I stand firm with the baseball announcers; they're paid to get it right.

    Note: Hasn't "axe you a kestchin" become sort of a stylistic thing? Something people choose? I mean, there are parts of the country where I won't blink at the word, "fiddy" (fifty), but when people around me start saying it suddenly for no apparent reason aside from some actor or rapper saying it, well, where's that chalkboard ... (listen to this!)

    On those occasions that H.P. Lovecraft resorted to necessary dialogue, he wrote in dialect. This is far different from his antiquarian bent, and was most likely motivated by his misanthropy. August Derleth, in a number of stories to this day pawned as Lovecraft stories, went sort of goofy with it. What's quite funny is that it often seems a foreign language, and then you realize that you're actually reading a very simple phrase.

    I sometimes think about recording my partner at specific times of day, but it was mostly for the overall effect. I always figured that the transcript would be incomprehensible to read, even though our time together means I can generally understand her. (I do this by ignoring two out of three words on average.) However, I've never thought of doing it to see how many effed-up words she's using. Ye gawds.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  17. chunkylover58 Make it a ... CHEEEESEburger Registered Senior Member

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    But i dont see the problem, when reading chunkylover58 line: Its only problem is that it's broken. the outcome is the same to me with or without ', perhaps its because my writen english is so bad, and im there for more used to compensate for errors when reading, but that only lead me to belive that people with english as primary should be able to read over the errors, and understand the general msg far better.

    That's along the lines of "If you know enough to correct me, then you understood me fine. What's the problem?" That's bull.

    The problem is basic communication skills. I shouldn't have to decipher what someone is saying to me and "compensate for errors." If I misunderstand you because I'm ignorant, that is my problem. If I misunderstand you because of poor spelling, a dangling modifier, or just bad grammar in general, that is your problem.

    If you were to write "Its only problem is that its broken" and read it correctly without first thinking you would have to compensate for an error, one would think that you had left out the rest of the sentence. " ... its broken______" What? What does it have that is broken? And why is its broken part a problem?

    If you write "It's only problem...." That's saying, "It is only problem"....That's Tonto/Frankenstein/Caveman speak.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  18. Kunax Sciforums:Reality not required Registered Senior Member

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    2,385
    Petersen or Pedersen, 2 other very simular scandinavian names.
     
  19. Bells Staff Member

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    22,817
    Oh finally, someone who understands!! Terms such as 'sup, wassup, yo!, dang, etc have always had the ability to make me want to hurt the speaker. Main reason is because such terms are copied from shows or songs. For example, one day in my first year of uni, I was walking to a tutorial and bumped into a classmate who was born in Australia from Italian parents. I ended up turning around and walking in the opposite direction when she greeted me with "yo! yo! baby girl... where you at". After staring at her with my mouth open in shock, I just turned around and walked the other way lest I hit her with my bag. She'd never once spoken that way before, but from that day, she spoke like she was an African American living in Harlem. On several occasions since that day, I have found myself walking away when she's come out with a comment or statement that had me gritting my teeth to the point of pain.

    The last straw came when she called me 'sister' because she knew that I had a distant African ancestor and because I had curly hair and olive skin (what made this even more annoying was that she and I had the same colouring), so she took it upon herself to call me 'sister' since I was black and 'in da hood' and all... wherever this damned 'hood' was in Australia

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    . On this day she found me sitting in the library immersed in some old cases and she greeted me with "dayuummm sista, sose dis where you bin hidin at". I can't repeat what my reply was since such language would probably end up with my post being deleted. Suffice to say that she avoided me after that

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    . But this is my major gripe at all this, why is it that people think it is cool to behave like sheep? See something on TV and they instantly start sounding and dressing like the image. Honestly, it's mildly amusing when a 4 year old does it, but when adults partake in such behaviour, it's annoying!
     
  20. Kunax Sciforums:Reality not required Registered Senior Member

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    2,385
    To a large extend, it's the responsability of the person creating the messeages, to make it as correct as possible, with in his/hers best abillities. but if that person wants to talk or in this case post posts, they have to jump in with both feed hoping someone can understand them, for many this is a huge problem, as they fear people will make fun of them or they will not be understod/missunderstod.

    It then becomes the other parts responsability to understand what they are tryings to say. in maintaining 2 way communications you cannot just say "learn to type/talk", because sometimes the other part(which could be youself) is trying there best to be understod, and the info they have could be of vital importances.


    I understand the used of its/it's better now, perhaps i can even begin to use it correctly

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    .
    I do how ever read its/it's as the same word and get the meaning from the rest of the sentance.
    So when seeing something like "It's only problem...." i dont see "It is only problem..." but "Its only problem...", 'its' is just a word with "dual functions", the sentence reviels which function to use.

    When i said "compensate for errors" i did not mean i had to studie the posts, its was meant as a natural part of reading, only being stopped be something that "breaks" the line or to much not understod proberly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  21. Kunax Sciforums:Reality not required Registered Senior Member

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    2,385
    dang is good word, damn is better but some get angry when its used. there is also a word starting with f, i would like to use more, but dont because i dont know how "sencitety" the people im talking with are.

    i have also use wazzup simple because it can be funny

    edit
    is this wrong use of its "some get angry when its used"?
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  22. chunkylover58 Make it a ... CHEEEESEburger Registered Senior Member

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    592
    Yep.Should be ".... when it's used." Think that you are really saying "it is" and you are contracting the two into one word. The apostrophe takes the place of the space and the i.

    "Its" would be appropriate if you were to say, "Some get angry with its use." "Its" being possessive, like "yours" or "ours." No apostrophe. I think it confuses some people because normally you make a noun possessive by adding " 's" to the word. "Stacy's mom is hot."

    This brings me to another issue that bugs the hell out of me ... OK, 2..... I just thought of another. Just because a word ends in S doesn't mean it needs and apostrpohe. :bugeye: Only in a contraction or in the above mentioned possessive form.

    Also (outside of forum use, I know) - .50 cents is NOT 50 cents. It is *point 5 cents* - 1/2 of a cent. I can get 2 of them for a penny.
    So, I see signs in the grocery store: "Banana's - .50 cents a pound". :bugeye::bugeye: I want to take two pounds up to the counter, give them a penny and go on my merry way, "Hey! Sign says....."
     
  23. Silverback Registered Senior Member

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    213
    Hahaha, that would be fun to try.

    I am guilty of a few of these things myself (its/it's) if I am typing too fast or just not paying enough damn attention. Feel free to correct me, I take no offence. (well, unless someone is intentionally trying of course)

    And if y'all have the need to vomit, feel free.

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    (just kidding, Bells)
     

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