Word of the Day. Post it Here

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Captain Kremmen, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    True but
    still refers to the fetus. The fetus also is going through the third trimester of pregnancy

    Consider, the mother could be aged between 18 and 45

    Considering the brain is deemed to be fully formed at around 21 Gyrification is not happening to the mother through that age range

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,504
    The fetus is there but it's a stretch to say it's pregnant.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    The fetus is NOT pregnant.

    It itself is IN the third trimester

    Perhaps this will help

    Another extract from gyrification

    The development of gyrification begins prior to birth (see Figure 1), with the early stages of gyral and sulcal formation taking place between 10 to 15 weeks of human fetal life (Chi, Dooling, & Gilles, 1977; Zilles et al., 1997). During the third trimester of fetal life, when the brain is undergoing considerable growth (Chi et al., 1977), the brain develops from a relatively smooth, lissencephalic structure to a brain that more closely resembles the morphology of the adult brain (Armstrong, Schleicher, Omran,.....

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2815169/#:~:text=Gyrification is
    %20the%20process%20by,the%20brain%20undergoes%20considerable%20growth.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  8. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,504
    Which is why I suggested that gestation would be a better word to use than pregnancy.
     
  9. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    To tired to check if I used pregnancy or the articles

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  10. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    noumenon

    noun
    1. (in Kantian philosophy) a thing as it is in itself, as distinct from a thing as it is knowable by the senses through phenomenal attributes.
    Definitions from Oxford Languages

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  11. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
  12. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    Cashtronauts

    People with enough money, like Jeff Bezos to fly into space

    Clayton C. Anderson, Retired U.S. Astronaut

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    sideshowbob likes this.
  13. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    oeuvre

    noun

    the works of a painter, composer, or author regarded collectively.

    "the complete oeuvre of Mozart"

    a work of art, music, or literature.

    "an early oeuvre"

    Definition from Oxford Languages

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  14. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,944
    luposlipaphobia

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  15. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
  16. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    resile

    verb FORMAL

    past tense: resiled; past

    participle: resiled
    1. abandon a position or a course of action.
      "can he resile from the agreement?"

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,555
    hors d'oeuvre
    /ôr ˈdərv/
    noun
    plural noun: hors d'oeuvres
    1. a small savory dish, typically one served as an appetizer at the beginning of a meal.
      "a wine and hors d'oeuvre reception"
    Definitions from Oxford Languages
     
  18. geordief Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,606
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,504
    Although rules can be troublesome. Correct English would be "masters of ceremony", I think - but are they plural masters of a singular ceremony?
     
  20. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,102
    It's the same with with terms such as "courts martial", "attorneys general" etc. It's where the term is a noun-adjective compound. In English we can talk about "lands unknown", which sounds more poetic than "unknown lands", where we put the adjective at the end, but in such cases it is the noun that is made plural, not the adjective.

    Hors d'oeuvre is a tad different. It literally means "outside of the work", and it really doesn't have a plural, as something is either outside of the work (or meal) or it isn't. It's a digital proposition.
    An hors d'oeuvre (as in appetizer) is the totality of whatever is provided, whether it consists of a single item or multiple. In English, though, it has come to mean an individual item that is served, rather than the totality. Hence we might often see it pluralised, to refer to more than one individual items that make up the appetizer course.

    It would be much like referring to each individual piece of an artist as an oeuvre, and thus, if consisting of more than one piece, calling his entire work oeuvres. Doesn't really make sense. But it's what the lazy English speaking countries do to words they appropriate from other languages.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    sideshowbob likes this.
  21. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,102
    Qualification: world's longest word published in an English dictionary. It is also often discounted, though, for being coined solely to achieve the title of longest English word.

    There are far, far, far, far, faaar longer words once you include all the chemical words out there. For example, the longest I'm aware of is 189,819 letters long and takes around 3-4 hours to pronounce. It's the full chemical name for the protein titin. That said, lexicographers discount such words for being formulae rather than words, although some might argue that that is splitting hairs.

    According to my brief research...
    There's a word in the Philippines that's 59-letters that has a legitimate and sensible meaning: "Pinakanakakapagngitngitngitngitang-pagsisinungasinungalingan" meaning "lying that causes the most extreme anger".

    However, the longest published actual word (i.e. not including chemical formulae) was back in around 400 BC, in a play by Aristophanes, which came in at 171 letters (or 180 or so when translated into English). It was a fictitious word at the time, one such as supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, but given that the latter is now considered a word, I can't see why the former wouldn't be.

    In Germany there's "Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz" which means "law for regulating the labelling of beef", but has since been dropped when the EU dropped the need for the law.

    In Iceland, another country to go big on compound words, there's the 64-letter "Vaðlaheiðarvegavinnuverkfærageymsluskúraútidyralyklakippuhringur" , meaning the unsurprisingly uncommon "a keychain ring for the outdoor key to a road worker’s shed in a moor called Vaðlaheið."

    Welsh also has a name of a town that is 51 letters.

    But if you want to stick to English dictionaries, then yeah, your word does it.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  22. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,092
    Would add to much to work / fun load to explore some of the rabbit holes I encounter

    Thanks for the post

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  23. geordief Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,606
    The clue is in the first nine and the last six letters. (plus my degree in Scandinavian economic immigration down the years)

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     

Share This Page