Windows 10 'Edge' to be released in July 2015

Discussion in 'Computer Science & Culture' started by danshawen, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    3,950
    http://www.itpro.co.uk/operating-systems/23119/windows-10-release-date-and-specs

    Free upgrade for users of Windows 7, 8.0, 8.1 in first release year. Charges (not a subscription) applied for upgrade after that.

    Capable of running both iOS and Android apps.

    The 'last OS' Microsoft ever proposes to make. Internet Explorer will be replaced by something closer to Chrome, and hopefully less susceptible to hackers, malware, and security threats.

    I generally approve, but if this version of their 'last OS' still has a registry, and/or requires me to run something like MalwareBytes and/or SuperAntivirus, CCleaner every day, I think I'll pass. When you add up all the time and effort required to do those things you have to do to keep your computer safe, and all of the processing power it takes to do that, think of how you could be using some of that time and processing power for getting more of YOUR OWN work done faster instead of protecting Microsoft's security hole ridden OS. Is it really worth it?

    Macs cannot be used in our government because we still have a nuclear arsenal. And thanks to Microsoft the Chinese just hacked info on every government employee. To give it to their new friends the Saudis. Thanks again, Microsoft.

    I use a Mac every day. No such worries about malware or viruses. Ever. I do continuously ride herd on the number of super cookies being set in my browser. Super Cookies are another Microsoft innovation to "enhance your browsing experience". I say we all ditch them for good. Use Linux if you don't like Apple.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2015
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  3. dumbest man on earth Real Eyes Realize Real Lies Valued Senior Member

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    You may want to do a little research...a lot has changed in the last 5 - 10 years.

    BTW, danshawen, was it ever actually - completely - entirely true that Metrologist's did "...It with a 50-Ohm Load" ?
     
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  5. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, and sometimes with a 75-Ohm load. We had a few "cantennas" for that purpose, as I recall, as well as one that was rated in excess of 1 KiloWatt. Some interesting war stories there, but I didn't like that work as much as a satellite telecom engineer (22 years), or being on a robotics engineering team in the DARPA Grand Challenge 2005.
     
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  7. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    July 29 is the advertised release date. The local school system has made the decision not to upgrade beyond windows 7 for the 2015-2016 school year. Part of that is related to the poor timing of the release. Software which depends on Windows to present lesson plans is just one aspect that didn't time right.

    If Microsoft really desires to change their image, licensing some other companies to maintain earlier versions of their OS would go a long way. School systems aren't made of money the way Microsoft seems to be.
     
  8. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    I'm not well versed in computer protection. Wife with windows 7 pro, visited a site yesterday that keeps sending her mal ware every 5 or so minutes. Her Avast anti-viruse tells it has blocked each one.

    Is there some way she can block anything coming from this site? If yes, how do I learn the ID of the site and then block it?

    Also is either MalwareBytes and/or SuperAntivirus, CCleaner free? If both are, which do you recommend? Can the co-exist with the Advast? I have been told one should only have one anti-viral program.
     
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  9. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    Both malwarebytes and super antivirus have free versions and are officially recommended by microsoft
     
  10. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks, but I had several other questions too.
     
  11. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    You might need to clarify for others how it is being sent or how it is making itself known: Pop-ups on the screen? Settings being changed? Tons of spam bypassing email blocks? Browser being hijacked and taken to undesired sites? Computer just generally behaving crazy as if it is possessed?

    Depending upon the specific nature of the attacks, you could download and try Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool in addition to running a manual scan of free Malwarebytes version. Also install Antiexploit to help protect the browsers in the future.

    They're compatible with AVs; MB is more anti-spyware than antivirus and CCleaner is a tool of other functions. Free version of MB only runs manual scans and removes threats, anyway (doesn't work full time blocking malware).

    I discovered over the course of a couple of months now that the free version of Panda anti-virus (which works differently than traditional ones) will install and seemingly abide peacefully on Win7 with other antivirus programs such as Avast free edition or Microsoft Security Essentials. It requires being connected to the internet, however, since Panda AV consults the Cloud for site and file checks rather than downloading and storing virus definitions into the computer. Unlike the free version of Avast, it can perform automatic daily, weekly, and monthly scans of the computer.

    The live protection of two distinct types of antivirus programs combined with running manual scans using Malwarebytes, offers a 3-way punch which might provide above-average protection when limited to using free programs. (Panda has definitely caught a few things that Avast didn't and vice-versa.) There's also an optional 30-day trial of the the pro-version of Malwarebytes available which offers live protection, automatic scans, etc.

    I use Glary Utilities on our extra, secondary PCs; but less-aggressive CCleaner probably has less risk of accidentally removing something important. Some experts even contend that messy registries and other forms of "trash / grime" build-up really don't cause significant problems, and thereby it's safer to just leave certain areas alone.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  12. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Again thanks. The virus or mal ware is not doing anything as advast, the free version, is blocking it. All we note is Advast patting itself on the back for blocking a dangerous site.
     
  13. dumbest man on earth Real Eyes Realize Real Lies Valued Senior Member

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    Billy T, without knowing exactly what type of "exploit" is "attacking" your computer, I cannot tell you how "EXACTLY" to solve your problem.

    However, if you go to : https://www.malwarebytes.org/ , you will be able to download a "Free Version" of 'malwarebytes' that you can "Run" and will find and remove a good percentage of "Viruses/Malware/Spyware/etc." that may be causing your "Problem"...

    Malwarebytes "plays well" with Avast and should "Solve" your "Problem", as long as it is not a "MAJOR EXPLOIT"...

    Good Luck!!
     
  14. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    Sounds like a very dangerous site to just avoid, then, in terms of solving the problem. Unless this is still a case of the PC having picked-up by something there that Avast is battling even when not visiting the site. If the latter, then the computer is definitely infected to some degree, even if the antivirus is doing a good job of preventing the malware from doing its full dirty work.

    As DMOE suggested, scanning with MB could locate and remove a menace; I'd also suggest (again) downloading and running a scan with Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool (KVRT, link below), which is likewise free. As a last resort (due to the potential collateral damage caused by extracting an extremely difficult-to-remove threat), there is Norton Power Eraser. I've frankly never had to try it though; just MB and KVRT.

    If high-class malware is involved that prevents you from downloading / installing Malwarebytes or prevents the program from performing, you might have to download the exe files of KVRT and Norton Power Eraser from the web with a non-infected computer. And then copy or move those files to an old flashdrive stick of 2 or 4 GB that you don't care about losing, and plug it into a USB port of the infected computer. Try opening and running these removal tools from the semi-isolation of that stick itself.

    One of our Win7 computers uses the free edition of Avast for basic protection, and this is the rest of the combination of software I use to augment it:

    Antiexploit (Live heuristic browser protection, free edition):
    https://www.malwarebytes.org/antiexploit/

    Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool (Removal of viruses already infecting a computer, free):
    http://www.kaspersky.com/antivirus-removal-tool?form=1

    Malwarebytes (Removal of spyware and malware already infecting a computer, free edition):
    https://www.malwarebytes.org/antimalware/

    Web of Trust browser addon (color-coded rating system for sites on searches and site visits; also suspends loading of unsafe sites):
    https://www.mywot.com/en/download

    Glary Utilities (Optimizer tools, free version):
    http://www.glarysoft.com/

    Panda (Cloud antivirus, free edition): IF it does install and get along well with Avast as it currently does on the aforementioned PC:
    http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/panda_cloud_antivirus.html

    Concerning Panda, I switch off its "USB-vaccine" feature to avoid problems with flashdrives resulting from forgetting about it. I install Panda via the customized option route so as to unclick the 3rd-party software it would otherwise install. Click its "Files Scanned" section to get to the place for setting automatic scanning schedules. Similar to free version of Avast, it has a small, daily nag-screen that appears in the corner.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
  15. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks. I did that and ran it. It seems to have cured the problem, so something must have gotten in to my wife's computer. The free version can not be scheduled to run, but only runs when you tell it to. (I like that.) It found about 20 problems and then when it ran the final "heuristic" analysis, the total of problems climbed to 156. We listed them all and none were anything wife had made. Many were of type .dll and we had all 156 put into "quarantine." That was a day ago and every thing seems to be working fine still AND the Avast is no longer telling us ever five or so minutes that it blocked a dangerous download.

    So thanks again.
     
  16. dumbest man on earth Real Eyes Realize Real Lies Valued Senior Member

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    ...
     
  17. Repo Man Valued Senior Member

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    My anecdotal experience with Windows 7 is that I've been running it since the RC version, and I've never had any issues with malware. I have had to clean some other people's computers, but they let them get behind on security updates and such. Not being an Internet Explorer user helps.

    I put together a spare computer a few weeks ago, and downloaded a Windows 10 ISO and installed it. I found Windows 8 to be annoyingly counterintuitive, so I stayed with Windows 7. But I like Windows 10, and I'm looking forward to upgrading my primary computer from Win7 to Win 10.
     

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