Will a dissected living cell come back to live ?

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by timojin, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    A cell, been dissected having all organelles in the membrane . Will it revive ?
     
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  3. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    Kind of a confusing question. Can you try again?
     
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  5. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    A cell membrane enclose its components ( DNA, ribosome and other components which make a cell a living organism ) The components that make the cell as a living organism will be lysed by a virus , or by other means within the membrane . Then this cells will be put into a dish, and food will be added necessary for a cell.
    Question : Will the lysed cells grow and multiply ?

    I hope It helps
     
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  7. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    There are some organelles who in fact can do that. The "water bear" (a Tardigrade) is an example.
    There are also "extremophiles"
    Because these organisms have abilities far beyond the necessity of earth life, they are the basis for speculation of "panspermia".
     
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  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    A tardigrade is an organism, not an organelle.

    A mitochondrion, for example, is an organelle. Or a cell nucleus.

    I'm not a biologist but so far as I am aware if you dismember a cell by rupturing its membrane that is the end of that cell.
     
  9. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    My understanding of the question was that the cell itself was intact but dissected from a larger organism.
     
  10. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for the correction.
    Let me rephrase the question: Assuming the cell itself is not disturbed, but was dissected from a larger organism would it retain its ability to duplicate and become a living organism again?
     
  11. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    To my understanding a virus can penetrate a cell ( E. Colli ) it will destroy the inside chopping the DNA or RNA but the content inside the membrane become nonfunctional for life. Again the content of organization inside the cell is reduced . such cells when surrounded or immersed with nutrients , they do not replicate , nor multiply ,
     
  12. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    See my post # 8
     
  13. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, but that is not the OP question, as you posted it.

    An internally damaged cell is obviously no longer functional as that cell.
    But if the cell is intact but removed (dissected) from the original organism, is the cell still viable?
     
  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I think that is the basis of cloning, is it not?
     
  15. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    I agree.
    So the answer to the OP question is : Under the right circumstances, yes.
     
  16. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Surely what the virus does is to hijack the cell, to get its replication system to make more viruses instead of dividing to make more copies of the cell, isn't it? To do that it has to avoid killing the cell immediately - it just perverts it.
     
  17. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    Now . if we look at creating life. Here we have all the component and more to start life and we have in addition food . So even every thing to life is present but the organization ( structure ) is not in place,
    life will not exist.
    That is my answer to the hypothesis to the primordial soup.
    Then the question becomes . how the organization or building of life begins ?
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I don't understand what you are trying to say. Where do "we" have all the components and more to start life?

    And what has this got to do with getting a single, dissected cell to replicate? It is already alive.
     
  19. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    An electrical charge, just like Frankenstein maybe?
     
  20. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    In order to have life meaning the cell have to be capable to reproduce itself . To live is to have componente ( chemical ) to absorb other chemical that will react and producing heat so other chemical will be produced and continue such cycle . But as you know all reaction produce products , and in an living organism (products ) grow to a size in the envelope (membrane ) it can burst or will intelligently divide itself ( duplicate )
    As you know some of the chemical component in the cell ( within the membrane ) act as catalysts. So in my scenario , of you destroy some of the components ( catalysts ) the reaction will not go any further and so the reaction will not proceed and you have a nonfunctional cell dead. And so you my have all chemical component in the cell but if they are not set to react in a proper sequence . the system is dead.
    Pardon me if I missed in my explanation . You are a chemist you know this good or better then I.
     
  21. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    The Miller experiment in the 1950 did not produce any long peptides.
     
  22. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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  23. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Or mutates!
     

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