Whinging

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by DaveC426913, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  3. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Did You Know?
    Whinge isn't just a spelling variant of "whine." "Whinge" and "whine" are actually entirely different words with separate histories. "Whine" traces to an Old English verb, "hwinan," which means "to make a humming or whirring sound." When "hwinan" became "whinen" in Middle English, it meant "to wail distressfully"; "whine" didn't acquire its "complain" sense until the 16th century. "Whinge," on the other hand, comes from a different Old English verb, "hwinsian," which means "to wail or moan discontentedly." "Whinge" retains that original sense today, though nowadays it puts less emphasis on the sound of the complaining and more on the discontentment behind the complaint.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whinge

    I have seen/heard it only on the internet & I believe only the last few years.

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  5. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Those sound exactly the same.
     
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  7. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    They do, don't they?

    But I guess an electric motor can literally whine, but it only metaphorically whinge. The difference being that a motor can experience (mechanical) distress but not (millennial) discontent.
     
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  8. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    I like "grizzle" the way English babies do when teething, or adolescents when forced to do house-chores.
    They don't turn grey; they just " cry continuously but not very loudly, or complain all the time"
     
  9. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  10. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    Whinge is a word you'd see or hear quite often in ol' Blighty.
    We're very good at it!

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    That and queueing.
     
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  11. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    It's also a common term in Oz.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I must admit I always thought the present participle was "whingeing", rather than "whinging". How do the Aussies spell it?
     
  13. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    My spelling reflects only my preference for fewer letters, as accepted for binge/binging. The word isn't in my chosen dictionary (American Heritage Third). If people here commonly rhyme it with ringing or singing (vocal), I have no objection to changing it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  14. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    So how is 'whinging' pronounced?

    To my Californian eye, it looks like it should be a wheezy way of saying 'wing-ing'. But I'd guess it's pronounced American-style as 'wine-ing'.

    However it's pronounced, its written form is never used by locals here in California. It would instantly expose somebody as a Brit. (Not that that's necessarily a bad thing.)

    What about you Canadians? Do you 'whinge' or 'whine'?
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  15. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    In my posts, the word rhymes with cringing, binging, hinging, etc. I live in Minnesota.
    It's not in my dictionary, I've only heard it spoken a couple of times - ymmv. California is on the other side of the mountains.

    The Canadians in my continental neighborhood don't whine, as a rule - the accent doesn't lend itself. Whinging is more compatible - not that it's common in my experience, which lacks class diversity among Canadians.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  16. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    Whinge is definitely pronounced the same way as binge, cringe, hinge, and thus it is whinge-ing.
    And I spell it with an "e".

    The Australians also quaintly refer to us as whingeing poms.

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  17. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    It can be spelled either way. Dictionaries list both spellings. Maybe "whingeing" is better, but for some reason it strikes me as wrong. I'm not sure.

    Similiarly, is it "bingeing" or "binging"? I prefer "bingeing", because otherwise you sound like you're ringing a bell.
    How about "cringeing/cringing"? Again, I think "cringeing" makes more sense.

    OK. Stop. Stop! You've convinced me. I'll spell it "whingeing" from now on.

    "Whinge" is suppose to rhyme with "binge" or "singe" (which, incidentally, also gives us "singeing", as opposed to "singing", which is something else if I recall correctly).

    Compare:
    whining, pronounced wine-ing
    whingeing, pronounced win-jing. (A bit like Beijing, although the Chinese pronounce that differently, and also in "whingeing" the emphasis is more on the second syllable.)

    Australians do both.

    My Oxford dictionary (Australian edition) defines:

    "whinge" (v.) (whinged, whinging) to whine, to grumble persistently. (n.) a whine or grumble.

    Wait! "whinging"?

    OK, Oxford dictionary. I'll spell it "whinging" from now on. Or should I rebel? Help!

    "Australia is quite nice, but nobody told us before we came here from England that it would be so hot! And so many flies! And all those dangerous snakes! And the gardens aren't as nice as back home. And they don't make bangers and mash the same way. ...."
     
  18. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Are you suggesting the correct pronunciation is win-'JING?
     
  19. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    The dictionary - any good dictionary - disagrees. With reason.
    Likewise with hinging, impinging, and many others.
    Parallel with changing, arranging, managing, barging, sponging, lounging, merging, serging, plunging, splurging, etc.
    (note that the ei pair often carries a sound as well, including after the letter "g": gei, zeitgeist, say, or Germanic names (Geithner, J Geils band). ), and it is almost never the short "i" required. - the problem exists in any spelling).
    And since this ambiguity of pronunciation is already an established feature of written English with many examples, and the form is a participle that takes its pronunciation from the root verb (so that the ambiguity is orthographic only), it's probably pretty well set.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2017
  20. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    No. Not really. I'm just saying that "whin" is a softer sound than "bay". The emphasis is not as obvious.
     
  21. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Point taken.

    So ... cringing?

    Maybe I was talked into adding the 'e'. After all, my initial inclination was to write "whinging". That's what I have always written before whenever I have used the word here.
     
  22. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Well I seem to have buggered everyone up nicely! Arf arf.

    Reminds me of that scene in which Capt Haddock is locked in his cabin by his mutinous first mate, Alan, who tells him he can spend his time pondering whether to sleep with his beard under or over the blanket - thereby giving Haddock a sleepless night, as he has never given it any thought before......under? .....that doesn't feel right....over?....no that doesn't feel right either...blistering barnacles! Etc.
     
  23. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    I've always spelt it as whingeing, but then I'm English and know how to spell properly.

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    And emphasis very much on first syllable... because I'm English and know how to pronounce things properly.

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    "Aw, strewth, mate! Nobody told us before we came here that it would rain so much? And be so cold? And there'd be no barbecues? And that we'd only get jobs in bars? And that you'd beat us at rugby?"

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