"That's re-diculous"

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by G. F. Schleebenhorst, Aug 2, 2007.

  1. mikenostic Stop pretending you're smart! Registered Senior Member

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    Yes I have, and I'm not taking away from the brutality of rugby. Rugby is a great sport. I have a lot of respect for it, but to call rugby, American football for pussies is BULLSHIT!
    There are quite a few issues with football players getting concussions (with pads on mind you). Football players also play with broken fingers, hands, arms. Players, like Steve McNair, have played with broken sternums.
    And regardless of whether or not players get their ears torn off or not, I'd still like to see how long a pro rugby player lasts in the NFL.
    Wearing no pads isn't a sign of toughness, it's a sign of stupidity; much like a stupid person will ride a motorcycle w/o a helmet. :bugeye:
    NHL players wear helmets and pads, and they still get teeth knocked out.
     
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  3. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Henry Winkler, the actor who played the Fonz, was Jewish.
    The Fonz was Italian American.
     
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  5. MacGyver1968 Fixin' Shit that Ain't Broke Valued Senior Member

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    "Hey..you wanna coke?"
    "sure"
    "what kind?"
    "Dr. Pepper"

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  7. lucifers angel same shit, differant day!! Registered Senior Member

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    who said rugby is american football for pussies, try saying that to a welsh person!! i hate it when people say that!! they obviously have never played rugby properly, and the welsh kick ass!!

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  8. Enmos Staff Member

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    That was the other way around.. lol
    It was said that American football is rugby for pussies.
     
  9. lucifers angel same shit, differant day!! Registered Senior Member

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    oh i am sorry i misread (again)
     
  10. mikenostic Stop pretending you're smart! Registered Senior Member

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    Sorry. I had that backwards. My bad. But you know what I meant.
    I have a lot of respect for rugby. It's a great sport, but I hate when people try to say American football is 'sissy' because we wear pads; what a cop out.

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  11. G. F. Schleebenhorst England != UK Registered Senior Member

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    What about having to stop every 20 seconds?

    Maybe it's the 3 tons of kevlar they all wear.
     
  12. superstring01 Moderator

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    I've played both Rugby and Football... and, although I am generally not a fan of Football (the US variety-- except when OSU plays), I will say for cetain, that it is hardly a sport for pussies. It's based far more upon the "brute" force of a person thrusting and upon the tactics of the coach + quarterback, whereas Rugby is based upon physical endurance and, to a bit, the relationships of the team with its members-- the game moves more swiftly and requires a lot of "active" synnergy between the players... whereas in US Football, where synnergy is required (of course), it's more based upon the individaul player's desire to do what he's told and Rubgy requies a player to develop almost a calculative instinct to anticipate the moves of his teammates.

    ~String
     
  13. mikenostic Stop pretending you're smart! Registered Senior Member

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    You have my full agreement on that one. That pisses me off to no end because if you're watching it on TV, it usually results in a commercial.

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    But blame that on the game itself, not the tenacity of the players.

    Let's see rugby players try to play wearing '3 tons of kevlar'.

    And are there any 6 foot 6, 300+ pound players playing rugby?

    I guess you could say that rugby is much more fluid (like ice hockey) and American football is more precise, calculated and technical?
     
  14. superstring01 Moderator

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    Exaxtamentey!

    ~String
     
  15. Absane Rocket Surgeon Valued Senior Member

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    Moved to linguistics at the request of SAM and Fraggle Rocker.
     
  16. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I confess that I do find myself saying that. Not like "congradjoolations;" I had to start listening to people before I heard it a few times.
    "Ax" for "ask" is called metathesis, a common phenomenon in English and many other languages. An awkward combination of phonemes is unconsciously "corrected" to one that is perceived as fitting the phonetic structure of the language "more properly." English speech is full of words ending in the KS sound so it feels "normal." Now that our economy and industry have made "task" and "disk" everyday words, I suspect that "ask" will become renormalized.

    As for "idear," that is that strange Boston dialect. It is not just non-rhotic (final R is silent). It is--well I don't know what the term is but I'll call it anti-rhotic. They add R where it shouldn't be. I remember a Bostonian trying to learn Spanish, he kept saying "lar casar." I don't know how or why "idear" came into wider use, of all the Bostonian pronunciations. Perhaps it was through the stand-up comic profession, the same way all Americans have learned to say "New Jizey" as a joke. Some words simply sound funny and comedians have the ear to pick them out and spread them.

    Surely you've heard about the guy from North Carolina who was pulled over for speeding in Oregon. The cop asked him, "Have you got any I.D.?" The driver said, "Any idee 'bout whut?"
    "Generalization" is the correct spelling in American English. You must know that we have changed all -ise suffixes to -ize; it was probably Noah Webster who performed that "standardization" for us. You have the anomaly backwards: what's "incorrect" on this side is that we break our own rule and spell "improvise" with an S. I wonder if anyone knows where that came from?

    British English is hardly free of inconsistencies. Why is the first syllable in "schedule" pronounced as SHE, when you pronounce other words like "schematic" with a SKE, just like us? And why is the second syllable pronounced JOOL, when you would be expected to say DYOOL?
    Since the accent is on the first syllable, the second O becomes a schwa. That makes it a prime candidate for elision. The British actually do more elision than we do, they pronounce words like "oratory" as "orat'ry."
    It's not that hard. As a carnivore, I don't use the word often enough to feel the need to speed it up. I say BROK-uh-lee.
    I'm a city boy. "Coke" is cocaine.
     
  17. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Rugby is a contact sport, football is a collision sport, soccer is a girl's sport.

    The pads, in football, are like the gloves, in boxing - they allow one to hit very hard, without breaking one's own bones. They are for hitting - look at their distribution.

    "Fluid" just means "simplified" - maybe "diffused". The strategy and tactics of football are the most complex of any sport.

    The "r" in "idear" is natural - in college I roomed with a New Yorker, and by the end of a term I was sliding into it. It happens as you sort of close your mouth heading for a subsequent vowel - it's actually easier to say "idear of" than "idea of": try repeating them six times quickly.
     
  18. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    My husband says que-pon and I say coo-pon (coupon). He also says bedroom suit instead of sweet (suite). Chase lounge instead of shays (chaise) lounge. And his latest one if gair-en-sheed wages for garnished wages. I thought it was just him til I heard his sister talk.
    Its just a family thing I guess.
     
  19. phonetic stroking my banjo Registered Senior Member

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    I'd agree with iceaura, having played both sports.

    The reason behind American Football just seems as though it's to get people crippled. That somebody gets a touchdown is by the way - the real fun is in charging at other people, launching yourself through the air and trying to injure them as badly as possible.

    Rugby seems more honourable. No pads and most of the time your object isn't to waste the opposite team members.

    Saying that, every sport seems more fun, as a young male, with the added macho-ness of violence. Football (soccer) included. We used to play 'full contact' football at school, much to the PE teachers' dismay. Flying and sliding tackles were the favourites. There's nothing quite like a studded boot sliding down your shin. It was part WWF and part shaolin soccer. Good times.
     
  20. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Koo-pon is preferred and is closer to the original word borrowed from French. However, kyoo-pon is also correct, at least in America. My Illinois family taught me kyoo-pon.
    That's just wrong.

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    Well... We Americans have mangled it so bad it's pointless to discuss which way is the baddest. The phrase is chaise longue, "long chair"! It's an example of metathesis in the written language to "correct" that second word so it became "lounge," something familiar and obviously "right."

    Of course the history of the phrase just gets stoopider the further you track it. Chaise is a bastardized deformation of chaire--bastardized by the French, not by us. Toward the end of the 19th century Paris became a cosmopolis for adventurous people from all over the world. (They called them Bohemians for the odd reason that since they had to come from somewhere they must all have been from Bohemia, or the Czech Republic as we call it today.) Most Europeans can pronounce the trilled Spanish-style R of southern France, whose original population were the Celtic Gauls. But the original population of northern France were the Germanic Franks, and they brought the gargled German R into the Latin that became Parisian French. Only Germans and Scandinavians can pronounce it. The rest of the travelers mangled it and made it into kind of a Z sound. Soon it became the height of sophistication for Parisians to mimic the mispronunciation of their own language by foreigners. (Geeze is that ever not at all like today's Parisians, eh?) So instead of Je vais a Paris pour acheter une chaire, they said, Je vais a Pazis pour acheter une chaise. The chaire longue was popularized at that time, so it got stuck with the faux-foreign pronunciation, and when we borrowed the furniture the name came with it. So don't worry about how anybody pronounces chaise longue. Absolutely everyone is both misspelling it and mispronouncing at least one of the two words!
    That's another example of metathesis. "Garansheed" sounds like "guaranteed," so it fits a familiar pattern. He's probably heard people in the payroll office talk about "garnishees," the people whose checks get garnished, and that just confuses him further. How does he pronounce it when you sprinkle salt and pepper on a pot roast?

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    We talk about dialects but there is such a thing as an idiolect, which is the specific language of a single person. I don't know any word for the language of a family, but obviously that level of linguistic community also exists.

    My family puts a short A in apricot, a short OO in roof, a short E in envelope, and the nut is a PEE-kon. We do something else that I haven't been able to compare very often with others. We pronounce "rider" and "writer" differently. The I in "rider" is a broad I, a diphthong formed on the A in "father." The I in "writer" is very narrow, a diphthong formed on the U in "up." It's very similar to the IJ sound in Dutch and probably harkens back to the dialect of New Amsterdam. Brits pronounce the two I's the same but they pronounce the D and T differently, as D and T. In America both consonants are reduced to a flap (the Spanish R) so we can't tell the words apart that way. Do you other Americans all say "writer" and "rider" with different vowels like we do?
     
  21. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Compared with boxing, they are all girl's sports.
     
  22. G. F. Schleebenhorst England != UK Registered Senior Member

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    That's....exactly what I was saying.
     
  23. Jeff 152 Registered Senior Member

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    Compared with MMA, they are all girl's sports
     

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