Scientists say sudden oak death epidemic is no longer stoppable

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by Plazma Inferno!, May 4, 2016.

  1. Plazma Inferno! Ding Ding Ding Ding Administrator

    Messages:
    4,609
    Since 1995, a fungal pathogen that causes a phenomenon dubbed ‘sudden oak death’ (a far catchier name than that of the pathogen itself, Phytophthora ramorum) has taken out millions of oak and tanoak trees, particularly along the coast extending northward from Monterey County. That includes areas of Marin County, Sonoma County and Big Sur.
    The pathogen is a fungus that affects different trees differently, and not all are susceptible. It will tear through a forest and kill some trees while leaving others standing.
    But in some trees, the pathogen causes tree trunks to crack open a ‘canker’ and literally bleed out sap. The disease is actually related to the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1800s. This disease has already killed a million trees in California, and scientists say it’s basically unstoppable.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...and-scientists-say-its-basically-unstoppable/
     
    danshawen likes this.
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. ajanta Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    606
    Engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new method to kill deadly PATHOGENIC BACTERIA, including listeria, in food handling and packaging. This innovation represents an alternative to the use of antibiotics or chemical decontamination in food supply systems.

    "In this study, they have identified a new strategy for selectively killing specific types of bacteria. Stable enzyme-based coatings or sprays could be used in food supply infrastructure-from picking equipment to packaging to preparation-to kill listeria before anyone has a chance to get sick from it," Kane said. "What's most exciting is that we can adapt this technology for all different kinds of harmful or deadly bacteria."

    Dordick and the research team found their answer in lytic enzymes. Viruses that affect bacteria, called phages, inject their genetic material into healthy cells. The phage takes over a healthy cell, and in effect transforms the host cell into a little factory that creates more phages. Near the end of its life cycle, the original phage creates and releases lytic enzymes, which break down and make holes in cell walls of the infected bacteria. The manufactured phages escape through these holes and go on to infect other healthy cells.

    http://www.google.co.in/url?q=http:...ggPMAA&usg=AFQjCNHWR8wHxvwuUD55FYyo72sj7ilPJA
     
    danshawen likes this.
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.

Share This Page