Saying Dead

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Orleander, Apr 20, 2008.

  1. Cardin Registered Senior Member

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    bit the dust
     
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  3. draqon Banned Banned

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  5. Vkothii Banned Banned

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    My native skills probably still wouldn't cut it on a marae, but I think a way to say it in Te Reo is:
    kua mate koe (they are with death; koe means "one person"),
    or maybe: tena mate koe (they greet death, or they say hello to death).

    The French say something like: "Il n'y'a pas encore"

    which means: "He has no more".
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2008
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  7. madanthonywayne Morning in America Staff Member

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    The origin of that phrase is interesting. It goes back to soldiers claiming they planned to retire and buy a farm one day. Many of them never got around to it and were killed in battle, so people said they'd "bought the farm" (retired).
     
  8. skaught The field its covered in blood Valued Senior Member

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    Shit! Learn something new every day!
     
  9. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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    Permabanned.
     
  10. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    LOL, my new favorite
     
  11. darini Registered Senior Member

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    - Gone to the "feet-together" land;
    - (s)he's 7 palms underground;
    - Hit his/her boots;
    - Turned into ham. (argh!)

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  12. skaught The field its covered in blood Valued Senior Member

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    Worm food
     
  13. Spud Emperor solanaceous common tater Registered Senior Member

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    Fell off the twig.
     
  14. PsychoticPremonition Registered Member

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  15. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I'm pretty sure this is cowboy talk, from the frontier-era mode of death of falling off of one's horse in a gun battle. Some professions or walks of life have their own slang terms from their own trade vocabulary, such as radio announcers saying, "He signed off back in 1998."

    I remember in the late 1970s and early 1980s in America people said, "He bit the big one." Does anybody know where that came from?

    Sometimes fiction writers come up with romantic and picturesque ways of saying it. I assume this is from the original E.E. Howard "Conan" books although I never read them: in the "Conan" movie when Conan was asked about his lover, he answered, "She sits at my god's right hand."

    Jews, while they believe in Heaven, don't believe anyone is going there very soon. Their bodies may lie in the ground for millions or billions of years before their god decides to resurrect everybody at once. (Which explains why the Orthodox don't allow cremation, embalming or organ donation, they'll need those bodies. Yeah we know they may actually be turned to coal by then.

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    ) Anyway you'll never hear Jews use euphemism like "He's in a better place," or "She's with God now." They're more likely to say, "Her suffering is over." Or, with their tendency to be a plain-spoken people, "We're rid of the gonev."

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  16. Myles Registered Senior Member

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    Slight correction. The French translates as " there is no more "
     
  17. Cannon Registered Senior Member

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    Epsilon
     
  18. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    Popped his clogs

    That's what I tend to say.
     
  19. Vkothii Banned Banned

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    Slight re-correction. Il n'y'a pas encore means: "He/it/there does not have more there". So there.

    And btw, qu'est-ce que c'est? means "what is that what that is?", so I have to ask: qu'est-ce que c'est, que ce qu' ça?
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2008
  20. Myles Registered Senior Member

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    Correction of correction: Il n'y'pas encore means there is no more. See il'y'a = there is.

    Il n'a pas encore means he has no more or no longer has something which has been referred to.
     
  21. Vkothii Banned Banned

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    Where did you learn French? From a supermarket book? "Il'y'a" translates literally as: "he/it has there". Usual translation: "He/it/there is".

    So when did you become a Romance language expert? Entrainer la mort, de cela projet?
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2008
  22. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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    why epsilon?
     
  23. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    yeah, you can't just make stuff up. epsilon. pffft
     

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