SAFETY - boiling water in a microwave

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Michael 345, Mar 27, 2021.

  1. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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  3. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    I know and I can't erase it either. It turns out it's a "video" and can't be posted. I added a link though.
     
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  5. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Ha, I see it. I should’ve clarified “I like watching water boil as opposed to heating water in the microwave.” Not just sitting around watching water boil in general. ^_^
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Sure...

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  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    That's because you weird Americans (OK, Persian Americans) don't have kettles.

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  9. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Lol @ these stereotypes of us Americans. I have a kettle, too.

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  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    You do?

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    When we moved for a while to Houston we searched everywhere for a kettle. We did find one eventually but it took ages and we had to resort to a sort of shop for European knick-knacks.

    But you're really Persian, aren't you?
     
  11. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, part Iranian (also Italian). My kettle looks like a silver antique type, with the very long, pronounced spout for pouring. It lacks a “whistle,” though.

    I didn’t know you lived in the US for a time? Learning new things all the time on sci forums.

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, from 1999 - 2001. Can't say I enjoyed the experience much, though it had its moments. I'd far rather have been in one of the East Coast cities, I think - more like Europe.

    But your kettle sounds authentically primitive. From your description, you must put it on the hob to boil. Everyone in Britain - just about - has used electric kettles for about half a century. We had one that went on the hob, with a whistle, when I was a kid in the 1960s. But then we are a nation of tea drinkers, so being able to boil water fast and conveniently is important.

    Being Iranian/Italian sounds rather interesting, by the way.

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  13. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    I can see that. The south offers easier weather than the north east (outside hurricane season) but I prefer the northeast in terms of things to do, culture, ethnic traditions, etc.

    I like how it looks but I bought it for its long spout. I make pour over coffee, and that requires a more controlled longer spout when pouring water over the grounds.

    Do you drink caffeinated tea in the morning? I like tea too but prefer one cup of coffee to wake me up in the morning.

    It is

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    - I wish Iran wasn’t such a risky place to visit but maybe someday...
     
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  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, if they can just get rid of the Serious Beards.........

    Yes I drink tea for breakfast: a blend of Assam and Darjeeling - with a tiny pinch of Lapsang Souchong for a touch of smokiness. I have two regular cups, and my teenage son has a huge half litre cup. We also have tea at 4:30-5 p.m. every day. He has another of his huge cups and I have one regular one. I used to drink more tea but, since I had an issue with a heart arrhythmia a couple of years ago, I've controlled my consumption a bit. We drink our tea in the English style, with a small amount of milk in it, which softens the tannins. I think this comes from India - at any rate the tea I was served in Indian shops in Dubai, when I lived there, always had milk in. As it also did when I visited Bombay, sorry Mumbai, a couple of times.

    I drink coffee, decaff, sadly these days, after lunch: I call it covfefe, to distinguish it from the proper coffee that my son and visitors have. But I've found a French brand of coffee capsule that tastes pretty authentic, so it's not too bad.
     

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