Rise of sea levels is 'the greatest lie ever told'

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by Mind Over Matter, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    I've just come into this thread and want to say that it was an excellent article. The Stockholm professor should be listened to imo. I remember the footage of the crops being newly ruined by salt water and the effect it had on me, but then read this:

     
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  3. Robittybob1 Banned Banned

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    Especially affects pacific islands. It would be so easy for the ocean floor to flex a little and the island to rise or fall. I was of that opinion too. I couldn't how sea level changes could be more noticed in one region than another. So in local areas tectonic plate movements are significant too.
    But that makes them susceptible to rising seas. Double whammy for them.
     
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  5. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    I'd have to disagree there. When said professor does not even understand the issues he is discussing, it is more worthwhile to listen to someone who _does_ understand them.
     
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  7. adoucette Caca Occurs Valued Senior Member

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    Take it up with the people at http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/10h.html

    Or

    http://www.ccsf.edu/Departments/History_of_Time_and_Life/content/EarthScale.htm

    Or

    http://www.marinebio.net/marinescience/02ocean/mgtectonics.htm

    OR

    Edit the Wiki articles since they must also be wrong:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crust_(geology)

    And

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isostasy
     
  8. Robittybob1 Banned Banned

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    Very interesting when you think about it. At one stage it floated, yet the mantle is thick today so the Earth is obviously cooling. Is that right? For the continental material would not have separated from the real viscous mantle. There has to be some fluidity somewhere or plate tectonics would grind to a halt. I'm going to have to brush up on this.
     
  9. adoucette Caca Occurs Valued Senior Member

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    Nope.
    Remember the earth is only cooling at about 100 C per billion years, so conditions in reference to the crust and the mantle are not that different now then they were hundreds of millions of years ago.

    The continents however were vastly different than they are today.

    Here's a reconstruction going back about 600 million years.

    http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~rcb7/rect_globe.html
     
  10. Robittybob1 Banned Banned

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    The consistency of the mantle would be vastly different if it has cooled 300 -400 degrees over 4 billion years.
     
  11. adoucette Caca Occurs Valued Senior Member

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    I'm sure it was if you go far enough back, you know like a LOT more active volcanos than we have today.

    In any casse, I was mentioning estimated cooling rates now.

    The world was a far different place 4 billion years ago.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Earth
     
  12. Robittybob1 Banned Banned

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    I am an Expanding Earth advocate as well so we've got expansion and contraction at the same time.

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    http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?t=107740

    And I propose that life started on Mercury.
    http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?t=110922
     
  13. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Perhaps you should post less, and listen more.

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  14. Robittybob1 Banned Banned

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    I'm listening. What did you say?

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  15. Gerhard Kemmerer Banned Banned

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    I was going to start a thread on this topic, but it is well covered here.
    There are many factors that govern ocean behaviour, but the major ones are not yet understood, or at least generally talked about.

    Water behaves differently on a large scale compared to a glass of water splashed in the laboratory. As the scale increases the relative viscosity increases to the point that water behaves more like a solid than a liquid. These dynamics also allow oceans to begin behaving more independently from the earth below.

    The tendency of oceans is not necessarily to settle out like water in your back yard pool. This concept is a lie on a global scale. Water between continents can remain risen in a gradual incline by as much as 90 meters above land level, and the water is not attracted to either shore. This state can remain for hundreds of years without changing. Although gravity on a small body of water levels quickly, on a large scale the ocean will tend to lift off and mount up with centrifical force and five other forces. But the oceans are held down towards the centre of the earth and not towards the shores as some imagine.

    It can also go the other way, it can sink and spread out, giving the illusion that sea levels are rising.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2012
  16. fedr808 1100101 Valued Senior Member

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    6,706
    Sorry, just had to say this because of the title.

    "I did not sleep with that woman." - Clinton

    Has to be a much bigger lie then that.
     
  17. Gerhard Kemmerer Banned Banned

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    Some posts have mentioned flexion of the earth beneath oceans.

    This phenomenon is far more pronounced and greater by potential than any other factor of ocean/land changes. Few realise the strong tendencies of oceans to dominate the land. If it happened, the land would never see day again.

    Whole continents with their mountain heights would bend and sink. This is not possible according to common sense. But on a large scale, land does not act like a solid rock, but more like a flexible fabric.

    This can be visualised by the effects of an earthquake, when the ground is moved in waves, which by the way, are not limited to a few meters high. The concept of an earth with brittle solidity is high chair science.

    It may interest some that as much as the ocean is liable to dominate the land, the atmosphere has the same dominance over the oceans, and were it not for several main factors (besides the hundreds) governing the atmosophere, the ocean would go out of control.
     

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