Psychology

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by PartyBoy, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. PartyBoy Registered Member

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    I have an Edipus complex...

    I killed my father with words. Lived with my mother. And now I am trying to stab my eyes out while saying very hasty words.
     
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  3. mathman Valued Senior Member

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  5. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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  7. PartyBoy Registered Member

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    Well you think you know everything, then you realize you can't spell. Funny how pretty much everyone has the same complex but no person could ever explain it to their family.
     
  8. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    Um, you think everybody has the same thoughts as expressed in the OP? In that case I think you are probably creeping around in the right forum.....
     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    You need to do a lot more reading. You write as though you just came across the concept of the Oedipus complex but haven't gotten around to reading any of the volumes that have been written about it.

    Freud is out of vogue, in case you didn't get the memo. Today there are legions of psychologists who just laugh at the Oedipus complex, or reinterpret it as something quite different and not nearly so icky.

    As the Wikipedia article points out, the Westermarck Effect, which was only discovered in my lifetime, does a very good job of thwarting any sexual interest in members of our immediate family. It helps us keep our gene pool stirred up and makes us a healthy species. Freud was raised by a nanny so he may not have actually identified his mother as a close blood relative when he was young.

    People who want to have sex with their parents are simply wired wrong. They are a tiny, pitiful minority of the human race. They have very little to teach us.
     
  10. Ripley Valued Senior Member

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    A sort of heterosexual achilles' heel, huh? Sounds like a drag.
     
  11. Ripley Valued Senior Member

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    But can't you imagine the burden of having to carry such a weight around? Like a hunchback of Notre Dame.
     
  12. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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    A bit rich coming from an outdated Jungian.
     
  13. PartyBoy Registered Member

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    Lets not laugh at those who can command respect from small groups of individuals, yet find difficulty gaining respect from their parents. Won't they always treat us like children until a fine mate comes by to uptake that position for them? Honor is brought by honesty even if a person does not like the truth in our own honesty. But respect is not some detail to be bartered for. It is commanded by a persons own inherent dignity.
     
  14. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I can imagine carrying a generic heavy weight around. But I can't imagine being sexually attracted to either of my parents. The Westermarck Effect is in full force in my synapses.

    Jung is widely used in studying literature, art and other matters of human culture. And there are still plenty of Jungian analysts. Freud is only taught in medical school and the only Freudian analysts are psychiatrists: MD's.

    Jung's archetype model of our instincts is the only one that explains (on the one hand) why the same images, legends, rituals and other motifs occur over and over again in our cultures, and (on the other hand) why we have inherited some instincts that may have been survival advantages in the Stone Age but are now impediments to peace and a unified world culture--the most obvious example being irrational belief in the supernatural or "religion."
     
  15. PartyBoy Registered Member

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    71
    Belief in a higher power is an instinct which developes when a higher power appears. A person becomes submissive to intellect even if the intellect is not a part of themselves, eg. A person talking to the at a bar, or professes god is even higher than him. It developed in te pre BC era and continued to an insatiable complexity in demand for power around the 1800's when words were being developed and could be used to confuse opponents not only on the dominants beliefs but their own.
     
  16. Trooper Secular Sanity Valued Senior Member

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    Let’s not forget that this outdated idea supports your sexist attitude towards gender roles.

    In other words, you feel that Jung's conception of archetypes and the collective unconscious align perfectly with evolution and the hard science of genetics, am I right?

    Remember, according to Mrs. Fraggle, the one with two X chromosomes, nothing better has come along. Not a fan of evolutionary psychology or cognitive psychology, eh?

    Jung knows what?
    that things happen for a reason.

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    "After all, today's Anglophones don't have a Jungian collective memory for the metaphoric imagination of long-dead speakers.” ~ Steven Pinker
     
  17. Ripley Valued Senior Member

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    Surely, the Westermarck Effect — or any typical academic proposal in human behavior — isn't as groundbreaking as it is an observation of a domesticated impetus — that commonplace predictability that serves to compliment rather than criticize contemporary culture. But for the deviant impetus, outside the flow of the commonplace, effect isn't so plain or logical or complacent.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2013

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