NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander lands on Mars May 25

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by cosmictraveler, May 10, 2008.

  1. draqon Banned Banned

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    "few hours" is not good enough ElectricFetus, my goal is to allow colonists to live their lives on planet Mars, not just "few" hours.

    Also, I stated the same thing, pure oxygen is way too dangerous as it explodes easily.
     
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  3. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    Your not capable of reading large paragraphs are you? let me simplify it:

    Pure oxygen at 14.7psi (normal pressure): not longer then 24 hour exposure, fire hazard
    Pure oxygen at 4.7psi (reduced pressure): indefinite exposure is safe (in theory), not a fire hazard.

    Now do you see why I response "GIYD"? Because even when I do waste the time of explaining it to you it does not sink in!
     
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  5. draqon Banned Banned

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    I diagree with this statement here alltogether. So called "theory" is faulty.
     
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  7. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    Look it up your self! Its a fact, not my opinion.
     
  8. draqon Banned Banned

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    Quoting you ElectricFetus:
    "Pure oxygen at 4.7psi (reduced pressure): indefinite exposure is safe (in theory), not a fire hazard"

    please give links and proof.
     
  9. hypewaders Save Changes Moderator

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    Here's some notes from a lecture on "Basics of Spacecraft Life Support", to compare what spacefarers have been breathing:


    At atmospheric pressures at or below 5 psi and under microgravity, there is no more O2 contributing to a fire (in other words no more of a fire hazard) than we have at normal surface conditions on Earth. We don't require any other gases than Oxygen for our metabolism (but the Water, CO2, methane, acetone, etc. that we exhale must be kept below problematic levels). Where other gases are added in artificial breathing (underwater or spaceflight) it isn't because of any physiological need for them. You could say that our physiology produces a surplus of CO2 and H2O (which are necessary) for our needs in a closed environment.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
  10. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    It turns out that it can't be frozen CO2 either. Dry ice under those conditions would disappear too fast.
     
  11. draqon Banned Banned

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    So Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo had Oxygen 100% at 5 psi.

    But those missions were way too short to actually have humans breath only oxygen for their lifetime...

    I do understand that fire hazard will no longer be there.
     
  12. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    Lets look at the mechanics of it: more oxygen makes fire burn more right? How much oxygen is in the air, 21% or a partial pressure of .21 bar, if you were in an atmosphere of .21 bar of pure oxygen the amount of oxygen reaching the fire would be the same as in normal air (not including the properties of nitrogen of course). Although .21 bar atmosphere of pure oxygen (3.1psi) will to your lungs look oxygen depleted, to your lungs it would seem like 2km above sea level because the partial pressure of CO2 and water vapor in your lungs will drop the oxygen partial pressure, the math though comes out that at 4.7psi pure oxygen your lungs should feel the oxygen partial pressure of sea level air (actually a little lower).
     
  13. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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  14. blobrana Registered Senior Member

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    "NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander repositioned its robotic arm slightly Tuesday and is now poised to deliver Martian soil to its wet chemistry laboratory."

    Read more
     
  15. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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  16. blobrana Registered Senior Member

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    "Flabbergasted" NASA scientists said on Thursday that first analysis of Martian soil appeared to contain the requirements to support life.

    Read more
     
  17. draqon Banned Banned

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    like what? water? lol

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    what a bunch of naive dopes.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  18. blobrana Registered Senior Member

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    You might be able to grow asparagus in it really well.
     
  19. draqon Banned Banned

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    what...just water? no nutrients? as far as I remember martian soil is full of oxides with magnesium, silicon, aluminum...
     
  20. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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  21. draqon Banned Banned

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    Quoting:

     
  22. Xelios We're setting you adrift idiot Registered Senior Member

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    To Mars, Again!

    WASHINGTON -- NASA has submitted funding proposals for a new Mars mission, scheduled to launch in 2012. The mission will entail a new Mars lander called the Advanced Series Polymorphic Asparagus Research Automated Growing Unit Seedfarm, or ASPARAGUS, and is expected to grow several varieties of asparagus in martian soil.

    "[We] might be able to grow asparagus in it really well... It is very exciting for us" says Sam Kounaves, mission planner for the new endevour.

    The lander will be expected to gather soil and deposit it into a 'grow-op' like container, where asparagus seeds will be added to the mix. "We just don't know what will happen after that, it will be very exciting to watch the developments unfold over subsequent weeks." he adds.

    Included in the lander will be a CD filled with asparagus recipies for future astronauts of the first manned Mars mission, planned for 2050. "The CD will contain dozens of recipies all featuring asparagus as the main ingredient. Things like boiled asparagus, steamed asparagus, steam boiled asparagus, fried asparagus, and even just plain asparagus!" says Angela Schmidt, the mission's asparagus habilitation expert.

    The $480 million project is expected to be greenlit later this year.
     
  23. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    I wonder when NASA will send a robotic craft to Mars , have it retrieve some samples, then have it return to Earth? Anyone know when that is scheduled?:shrug:
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2008

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