Manga or Manwha?

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by S.A.M., Jan 20, 2008.

?

Manga or Manwha

  1. manga

    100.0%
  2. manwha

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. something else

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Kadark Banned Banned

    Messages:
    3,724
    What are Turks?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    72,822
    Highly unusual - though the Turki topi (fez) is a frequent feature in Bollywood caricatures of North Indian Muslims. My dad had one too.

    I think we should go back to manga before Fraggle kicks me out.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Kadark Banned Banned

    Messages:
    3,724
    I take it you've never met a Turk.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Anyway, in Turkish, "India" is called "Hindistan". What do you call "Turkey" in Urdu (or whatever your mother tongue language is)?

    EDIT: Missed your edit. I'm sure Fraggle will understand.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    72,822
    Like I said, Turki (pronounced Tur key, with the tur pronounced as toor, but shorter)

    And here is an image of the fez in one of my favorite films

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  8. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    72,822
    Nah it was my second day in the US. I was F.O.B (fresh off the boat) not ABCD (American Born Confused Desi)

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

    Messages:
    24,690
    It would be unnatural for a Japanese to pronounce the phoneme combination HWA. H turns into F before U so they'd say FWA. Besides, they invented manga so they have a reasonable claim to the name.

    In any case I assure you that the imperious Japanese never pronounce words in a foreign manner. With Chinese and Korean words that already have a kanji, they simply apply the on reading and pronounce it in Japanese. Even names. The first two Chinese go masters arose back in my day, Wu Ching Yuan and Lin Hai Fong. When they traveled to Japan they had to get used to being addressed as Go Sei Gen and Rin Kai Ho. Kirin beer is named after the Chinese province of Chi Lin.

    That's what I appreciate about you wogs.
    Well they're going to go apoplectic if you throw around the N word over here. I avoid even spelling it out in a linguistics discussion. If some poor kid were doing research for his schoolwork on our board and his mother walked in and saw the N word on his screen, she might block our website. Only African-American comedians get to use it, and even they are highly criticized by their community for doing it.

    Yes that's awful, but we have to choose our battles wisely and this is not the battle to which I intend to donate my finite energy. There's a much larger battle going on and I would just be "collateral damage," or at the very least I would lose my credentials of being more or less on the honorable side in that battle.

    You're normally so gracious and polite, I'm surprised that this is the one facet of life in which you choose to behave out of character.
     
  10. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    72,822
    Its not considered impolite in India, or maybe it is, since we would not use it with strangers.

    I guess cultural caricaturing is du jour in India, since our movies, plays, literature, folk tales etc are rich in such caricatures that denote one of the myriad cultural segments that our society is made up of. Most of these terms used (e.g. Sardarji for a Sikh or Pandit for a knowledgeable person, a pandit being a Brahmin teacher) have become a part of the written or spoken language in a way that the person addressed would not be offended in the least. I could hail a Sikh guy as Hey Sardarji and he would not be offended in the slightest. I could not, of course, hail a South Indian as "coconut!" but Mallus call themselves Mallus, Bongs call themselves Bongs, Punjus call themselves Punjus, Gujaratis call themselves Gujjus and no offence is taken or given by referring to someone in this manner.

    Hence if we watch (in India) a TV program where black people call themselves the N word, it would be usual for us to assume that they do not take offence at it.

    Of course, I quickly learned otherwise in the states where words like N, cracker, honky, spic etc are not used in a manner that can be assumed to be a friendly identification or acceptance of a difference, rather a form of discrimination.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2008
  11. angrybellsprout paultard since 2002 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    I do have to admit though that I didn't discover the word manwha until this summer when I started to read a manwha titled Angel Cup. At the time, I knew it was done by Koreans, and there were some random untranslate bits of Hangul in it, but I didn't realize that there was a separate word, and a corresponding separate industry, in Hangul until I saw the wiki article for Angel Cup.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Cup

    p.s. great series btw
     
  12. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

    Messages:
    24,690
    There ya go.
    I think most cultures are like that. It's one of the manifestations of civilization. We have to learn to live in harmony and cooperation with the total strangers whom the tribal Neolithic human who still lives inside each of us would have regarded as enemies. Instead of killing each other over scarce resources, we call each other names. I can't deny that this is a vast improvement.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Our culture was like that up until WWII. American culture, unlike most European countries, is a giant pendulum that swings slowly to one extreme and then slowly to the other, instead of settling into a middle ground. We're now paying the dues linguistically for four hundred years of racism.
    It's not a whole lot easier for Euro-Americans. Their kids pick up words from TV and start using them innocently. I remember African-Americans beginning to call each other that in the 1960s. Somehow, in that much different era, it just seemed like one more manifestation of iconoclasm. Nowadays Euro-Americans don't understand it at all and neither do a lot of African-Americans, especially since there are many situations in which using that word could get a person fired or even arrested!
    Those other words are not nearly so loaded. It's just the N word. And I have to admit that even that is finally starting to make inroads. The police and security industry includes some of the least politically correct Americans, and it's also one of the most racially integrated. I know people in that industry who routinely call each other by what we consider racial slurs, and it's all just good naughty fun for them. Perhaps there is hope.

    But if you're still living in the USA, I'd advise you to err on the side of caution and eliminate the N word from your vocabulary.
     

Share This Page