How long is a COVID 19 throat swab viable for testing when NOT stored properly?

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by ToR original, May 23, 2020.

  1. ToR original Registered Member

    Messages:
    65
    Here's a question I can't seem to get any Virologist to answer.

    How long is a COVID 19 throat swab viable for testing when NOT stored properly?

    The specific example

    If a covid19 throat swab sample was returned to the LAB via regular 2nd class post (2-7 days) and it took 5 days to reach the sorting office (was in sealed package but not temperature controlled) would that sample when retrieved by the lab still be a viable sample for testing?

    ie. Does it/should it be refrigerated same day etc?
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. ToR original Registered Member

    Messages:
    65
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    No.

    I used to work in a photo lab. Customers would try to return film, and I would have to point out to them that it could have easily been sitting on their dashboard in direct sunlight and reached a temperature well over 120F.

    There is no point in testing something a sample whose provenance you cannot verify.
    Food for thought: What would you do if it came back negative? What would you do if it came back positive?
     
    exchemist and ToR original like this.
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. ToR original Registered Member

    Messages:
    65
    I will tell you what I 'did' Dave

    I immediately reported this company and what do you think the powers that be have done about it? ZERO. I'm still working on it. I just needed to know for certain what the situation was regarding how the sample was returned to the lab.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2020
  8. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    538
    Hello,

    Sorry, I have a different question about Rt-PCR test for COVID-19.

    When test detected as positive, is it sure virus also infected its main target lung cells?
    Can't it be just limited to upper respiratory tract or to nasopharyngeal area interpreting non- frank infection ?
     
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,872
    It is a test for the presence of the virus, not where in the body it has taken hold.
     
  10. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    538
    Then, how frank COVID infection is confirmed on finding test positive? There may be some defense mechanism which can restrict real infection i.e. entry into host target cells?

    Say for example, many pathogens remain present on skin but it does not mean those have infected the body. Moreover, in about 80% of confirmed cases of COVID test positive, most show no symptoms or just non lung related symptoms and most of them are also recovered. What will it suggest? Are these not having frank infection but just have virus in superficial area?
     
  11. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,872
    If the test is +ve, the person is infected and can therefore infect others, whether or not they become ill themselves.

    Most people don't get very ill with this virus and many young people don't seem to get ill at all. However some do get very ill indeed and may die.

    The purpose of testing is to confirm who is infected and thereby risks spreading the disease to others, some of whom could then die.
     
  12. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    538
    Thanks. Many do not become ill from this virus(although found positive in test) , what does it mean? Does it mean that virus has not or could not infect lung cells?
    In my other thread, I quoted one link which tell that ACE2 receptors are also present in upper respiratory tract. Does it suggest that under mild symptom condition, virus simply infected upper respiratory cells but not lungs cells?
     
  13. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,872
    Yes. That is what happened when I got it, in mid-March, as reported on this thread: http://www.sciforums.com/threads/members-coronavirus-thread.162937/page-2

    I had a very slight dry cough, a couple of feverish nights with a racing heart and a lot of muscle aches, especially in my upper back, and then I lost my sense of tase and smell completely for 2 weeks. So the infection never got into my lungs. Some people have a bad sore throat (I didn't). Others get digestive symptoms. So it can attack various parts of the body and not always the lungs. If it gets to the lungs, I understand you feel short of breath, but even this does not mean you need to go to hospital, unless it gets severe.

    However if you do get short of breath, I would definitely consult your doctor right away, because people with the virus in their lungs can sometimes deteriorate quite fast.
     
  14. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    538
    Right. Your case should suggest, it was infection just in upper respiratory tract not in lungs which can be more severe type. Many parts are capable to get this infection as suggested in link in my other topic where ACE2 receptors are present. However its severity in any part is main consideration. Now, we need to better understand infection limited to upper respiratory tract bringing simply mild not severe symptoms and their link to about 50% recoveries just by simple supportive treatments. In this regard presence of ACE2 receptors in upper respiratory tract n in blood vessels need to be understood for mild symptóms.
     

Share This Page