Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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  3. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Either, depending if you think the job requires one or more skill.
    We might also use the definite article, so it becomes "I have the skill/skills to do this job better than others." It's not wrong to omit the definite article, but if you've identified the specific skills you're referring to then you'd probably use the "the".
     
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  5. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Should that not read "the job requires one or more skills"?.............

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  7. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, I think so. Was typing too quick on a phone and didn't check the autocorrect. That said, I think it can actually be either, although plural seems to be preferable.
     
  8. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Why equipment no plural?
    How to indicate you got "many" equipment?
     
  9. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Equipment is the set of tools you have for a task. There may be many items in the set but only one set, linguistically speaking.
    You'd say "I've got lots of equipment".
     
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  10. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    1) Dividend is subject to financial status of the company.
    2) Dividend is subject to the financial status of company.
    3) Dividend is subject to the financial status of the company.

    Which is more correct?
     
  11. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    3 is the best of the three options, but still not good. For a start, the sentence should say what it is talking about. Does it mean that dividends are only paid if the company has a good financial status? If so, then why not say that?
     
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  12. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    onus = something you must do?
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    It's about responsibility. If you make a claim, the onus is on you to back it up - i.e. it's your responsibility to back it up.
     
  14. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Websters,
    Onus
    a: BURDEN
    b: OBLIGATION: a disagreeable necessity
    c: BLAME
    d: STIGMA
     
  15. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Why Equipment can not be written as equipments?
    If you got many pieces of equipment, how do you say?
     
  16. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    many pieces of people to make a big ball of peoples together in a bundle
    a small collection of black and white people in a group
    they are both sorts of colours black AND white
     
  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    "You're well equipped".
     
  18. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Like that.
     
  19. elte Valued Senior Member

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    I like that use of "that" when referring to something that came earlier instead of the more modern trend that uses "this".
     
  20. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Equipment is already plural. When you have only one piece of equipment you call it "a piece of equipment" not "an equipment".

    English is fussy about double negatives and double plurals - no geeses or mices either.
     
  21. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    maximize and optimize can mean the same thing?
     
  22. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Not really. "Maximize" aims for more or most while "optimize" aims for better or best. The maximum expenditure doesn't necessarily produce the optimum result.

    The maximum speed that your car will go is not necessarily the optimum speed for road and traffic conditions.
     
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  23. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    charade = something made up to pretend to be good?
     

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