Gravity waves detected for the first time ever

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by Plazma Inferno!, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. river Valued Senior Member

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    9,162
    Agreed

    But realitivity is perspective.

    Interesting

    Hmmm

    We do
     
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  3. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    Last edited: Jan 21, 2016
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  5. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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  7. PhysBang Valued Senior Member

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  8. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Who gives a crap Schmelzer. That's your problem. Nobody gives a crap. There is no disagreement between you and the mainstream. To have that somebody would have to give a crap.
     
  9. Schmelzer Valued Senior Member

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    It is not my problem. I'm doing what I'm interested in. I do not depend on any cooperation from the mainstream.
     
  10. quantum_wave Contemplating the "as yet" unknown Valued Senior Member

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    Found this tweet this morning:
    https://twitter.com/ego_virgo/status/697440846464073728
     
  11. sweetpea Registered Senior Member

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    News Release • February 11, 2016

    https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/WA/news/ligo20160211

     
  12. rpenner Fully Wired Staff Member

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    The physics review letters site has apparently gone down under the load of people trying to view the article of the discovery.
     
  13. quantum_wave Contemplating the "as yet" unknown Valued Senior Member

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    I watched online until they ended the feed. Congratulations to LIGO and to Einstein!
     
  14. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Meanwhile, APoD↱ offers a pretty graphic:

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    Caption excerpt:

    The featured illustration depicts the two merging black holes with the signal strength of the two detectors over 0.3 seconds superimposed across the bottom. Expected future detections by Advanced LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors may not only confirm the spectacular nature of this measurement but hold tremendous promise of giving humanity a new way to see and explore our universe.
    ____________________

    Notes:

    Nemiroff, Robert and Jerry Bonnell. "LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes". Astronomy Picture of the Day. 11 February 2016. APOD.NASA.gov. 11 February 2016. http://go.nasa.gov/1o77LF2
     
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  15. el es Registered Senior Member

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  16. rpenner Fully Wired Staff Member

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    http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102
     
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  17. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    This is really quite exciting. Discovery is wonderful.
     
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  18. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Astounding work. All these years working through the limitations a ground based gravity wave interferometer presents. The source prediction is phenomenal. Merging black holes. I wonder how they crossed each others coordinate singularity. lol LOL. Really stoked for these science teams. The computer simulation is an awesome tool. Cosmology and tests for GR are my favorite subjects. I'm flabbergasted as my dad used to say.

    The cite base for these papers will be huge. Awesome.
     
  19. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    Amazing. I would have lost that bet, big time.

    The final merger of the Hulse-Taylor pulsar-BH binary in September output gravity waves equivalent to the converted energy of three solar masses (brighter than the brightest supernova event). An amazing accomplishment for LIGO to have captured that. Congratulations, Kip and the LIGO team! Happy Centenary, Einstein's GR.
     
  20. rpenner Fully Wired Staff Member

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    Wrong.
    The Hulse-Taylor binary is a pair of neutron stars, PSR B1913+16, in our galaxy. The inspiral chirp comes from another galaxy about a billion light-years away and was from a pair of stars much to large for either to be a neutron star. They were black holes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSR_B1913+16
     
  21. brucep Valued Senior Member

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  22. Plazma Inferno! Ding Ding Ding Ding Administrator

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    Here's how it sounds:

     
  23. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Me too & how does a point "ring down" - Is this support for black holes having finite volume?
     

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