Galactic Collision

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Hayden, Jun 21, 2018.

  1. Hayden Registered Senior Member

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    It can cause..

    1. Runaway destruction of both the galaxies.

    2. A new bigger galaxy formation.

    Is there any observations of solar systems colliding in our Galaxy? Is it a possibility, kind of precursor to when Andromeda approaches us and starts pulverizing our Galaxy. We shd experience heavy movement in outer zone of our Galaxy (due to Andromeda's Gravity) even before Andromeda hits us, kind of triggering mass destruction for both the galaxies.

    Or both the galaxies will hug or permeate peacefully due to very large spacings between stars and settle down as a bigger galaxy.
     
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  3. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    The stars are spaced so far apart that there is little chance of a direct collision. They will pull through each other, then fall back, doing this until they are stable in relative velocity.
     
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  5. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    No that is not one of the options.
    That is what happens when galaxies collide.
    Huh? A solar system is a star (double, triple, etc) system. The galaxy contains about 400 billion stars. A lone star system would have no effect on the galaxy.
    There is not going to be mass destruction. The event will certainly trigger a large amount of star formation as the various nebula and dust clouds are affected by the gravitational effects of the collision.

    This is what will happen.

    PS. Who cares? There won't be anything living on earth when this occurs anyway.
     
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  7. mathman Valued Senior Member

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  8. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    I got to ask Lawrence Krauss about this when he was in St. Louis recently. He said that other than more stars in the sky in places we wouldn't notice the event.
     
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  9. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    All the stars we see are from our galaxy

    Asked friends other day the name of our galaxy

    Didn't know

    Sigh

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  10. nebel Valued Senior Member

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    Hope that in the process of the fly-through, our Sun could shed some of it's Helium and pick up some Hydrogen in exchange, to have our descendents live longer, cooler.
     
  11. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    By "fly-through" are you referring to Andromedia and the Milky Way merging? That takes place in about 65 billion years.
     
  12. nebel Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for the insight, true, we will be done in just 4 billion, unless as New Scientist Magazine ventured, we can harness some other star's energy to survive that long. corralling stars. get the lasso ready to snag the drifters.
     
  13. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    If the Earth doesn't somehow adapt we may be done within a billion years. The Sun gets hotter by about 10% for every billion years. There are some predictions that life on Earth won't be able to handle the repercussions from that.
     
  14. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    Sunscreen cream developed Factor 3,000,000

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  15. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    He was speak about post-collision, of course. Milkdromeda.
     
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  16. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Again, that's unlikely given the size of stars and the distances between them. It is, IIRC, four LIGHTYEARS to the nearest star right now. That's a whole lot of solar diameters.
     
  17. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    Milkdromeda I like it

    Although it sounds like a Starbucks coffee made with Camel milk

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  18. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    And you have to be a customer to pee in the black holes.
     
  19. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    Now now

    How many spiral arms do you think Milkdromeda will finish up with?

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  20. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Entirely dependent on the dynamics of the collisions. There may not be any.
     
  21. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    Well we don't know how many we have now soooo bit moot

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  22. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    The fun part will be when the SMBHs merge. Everything else will be pretty unremarkable, except for the night sky becoming rather more interesting over a few millions of years. Remember that we won't see new stars on the other side of the Milky Way for ~100,000 years after they arrive.
     
  23. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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