Future computer outlook

Discussion in 'Computer Science & Culture' started by wet1, Jul 23, 2001.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. wet1 Wanderer Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,616
    Hewlett Packard has developed a technique for using individual molecules to make computer circuits. They hope over the next decade to refine the process to make computers ever smaller while not losing the capabilities that they have today. Amongst the uses would be wearable computers, computers within materials, and injectable computers for medical uses. It is hoped that the size would be 1000 times smaller than those of today with the addition of nanotechnology.

    Any speculations on these developments?
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Shadow Existential Discontinuity Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    65
    What about internal computers where the inside of the eye is the display and a small part of the brain is used as a hard drive. You could have a cell phone transmitter embedded in a tooth and the receiver mounted in the inner ear. Maybe a souped up USB or firewire port behind the ear for faxing/printing/loading programs.

    I'm not being facetious here, this stuff fascinates me. I'd even be a test dummy for it. Though a friend did mention that he would hate to be hit with a stun gun. Talk about a scrambled memory.

    Shadow
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. wet1 Wanderer Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,616
    Putting a computer inside the eye is risky. For one thing the eye is filled with jelly. If the jelly seeps out then it is of no use. For another, you would have to put the pickup within the focal area on the back of the eye. Unless it is really small you will lose some vision where it blocks the image from reaching the cones and rods. Surgeons are reluctant to pierce the eyeball unless absolutely necessary.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. thecurly1 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,024
    Smaller computers, less weight less space, more computers in everyday devices. We could have a computer system inside a CD case that could allow you to play a 30 second sample of any song in the CD inside, and list the tracks and various other pieces of information. You'll have smaller music player items, smaller, and more efficient palm pilots, and a whole bunch of other things. This will be good, too bad I don't have HP stock.
     
  8. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Add these nanocomputers and a lot of memory, implant them in the body and let them control the chemicals in the body. No more pills every day.

    Do you think drug companies will go for that?
     
  9. wet1 Wanderer Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,616
    Would they go for it? What a sales pitch. Take this and no more 3-5 pills every day. And charge a bundle along the way. Think you're coming down with something, let's find out. Take this. (handing out danish pastry loaded with nano pills)
     
  10. 01001010 ... unique ... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    49
    i think it would be very interesting to have much smaller computers. You could be checking your e-mail through your watch or have a 2 GB stroage disk the size of a quarter. While, even though it's smaller, it'll be 1000 times as fast as today's computers, which i find quite amazing.
     
  11. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Do you remember the global link in Earth: Final Conflict? Well read this:

    NEWS ( Business Week AUGUST 13, 2001 )

    Flat-panel screens found their biggest niche in laptops, but now they're replacing desktop monitors and even television sets. Part of the reason for this surge: a 50% slide in the price of high-end liquid crystal displays (LCDs) over the past year.

    That may be just the beginning. Researchers at Sarnoff Corp., Pennsylvania State University, and Kent State University say a new, jointly developed production process has the potential to slash the cost of video-grade LCDs by a further 90%. The process also promises to deliver screens that are lighter, more flexible, and more durable.

    The Sarnoff-led team uses organic materials for the transistors that control the LCD picture, and it deposits them on plastic substrates instead of glass. These changes enabled the team to drop the process temperature from 480F to about 100F--and to eliminate the need for costly clean rooms. What's more, because the organics can be sprayed on the plastic, it should be possible to produce the LCDs on continuous roll-to-roll printing presses, similar to those used to print newspapers. Arthur H. Firester, executive director for display products at Sarnoff, figures this approach could yield LCDs for about 20 cents per square inch, around 10% of the current production cost of a typical laptop-size LCD.

    In theory, the screens could be very big. Firester imagines someday covering an entire room in supercheap LCD wallpaper. Plus, flexible plastic LCDs bend where current glass-backed LCDs would break. And Sarnoff's plastic screens can be made at twice the pixel density of current laptop LCDs--yielding picture quality superior to that of high-definition TV.

    It will be three or more years before the researchers commercialize the technology. Meanwhile, they are searching for a manufacturing partner with printing expertise to help get the presses rolling.
     
  12. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Quantum Computer

    IBM Corp.'s Almaden Research Center unveiled the world's largest quantum computer to date — a 5-bit machine squeezed onto a single molecule — at the Hot Chips conference last week.

    The five fluorine atoms in the molecule each represent a quantum bit, or "qubit," which made the computer the first capable of solving a problem related to code cracking, called the order-finding problem, in a single step.

    "Every other computer in the world takes several steps to solve the order-finding problem, but our quantum computer solved it in a single step," said Stanford University researcher Lieven Vandersypen.

    The quantum computer was invented by IBM (stock: IBM) Almaden Research Center researcher Isaac Chuang, who led a team of scientists that included fellow researchers Gregory Breyta and Costantino Yannoni of IBM Almaden; professor Richard Cleve of the University of Calgary; and researchers Matthias Steffen and Lieven Vandersypen from Stanford University.
     
  13. Deadwood Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    386
    What about non-mechanical harddrives? Anyone know when we will see them in high capacity. It should be fast like ram. I don't think DNA computers will really substantiate.

    Also, 01001010, did you know that that is 69 in binary? I learnt how to do it without using the windows calculator last week!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  14. 01001010 ... unique ... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    49
    I'm happy for you, unfortunately "69" is not the only "meaning," if you will, of my username. There are some possible translations other than binary to decimal. What about binary to hex. Or hex to binaty to Ascii. Or maybe it has no meaning whatsoever (ie. the "182" in Blink 182.)
     
  15. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Motorola just developed a Gallium Arsenide chip that is 40 times more powerful (faster) that regular silicon chips. That blows Moores Law out of the water for the timebeing.
     
  16. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    13,101
    Going back to a previous post in this thread, implants within the eye are a complete irratation.

    I read somewhere of a implant that could be placed into your eye that could take low resolution images of what you do, namely reading a book, Hacking or signing a paper while under an official secrets act.

    From what I understand though, the implant SQID [Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device] although it might function as a sytem has no storage capacity, which means for it to be manipulated within the eye and have information recorded from it it needs to be inrange of certain eaves dropping equipment.

    The equipment and a little frequency manipulation and the information transpiring through a doppler effect do the rest.
    For people effected by this they might spy a black dot in the centre of one of their eyes which is the implant, and it might be more noticable when they try reading or focusing on something with detail.

    I think the direction that Cybernetics is heading, although there are people working on direct connections between circuits and genetics I would think that people will continue using frequencies as a method of transfering information from genetics to equipment because it can be removed far easier if there is a problem.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2001
  17. tetra Hello Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    144
    Ive got this odd idea... that you could use a quantum computer and an equation making system, and you have infinite storage space.

    Because each and every sequence of numbers repeats infinite times in pi, every peice of data ever known to man is contained in pi an infinite number of times. All you have to do is record what decimal place this sequence starts and stops, and you have the file. All you need is some enourmous computing power, because large sequences of numbers that you want do not happen too often in pi.

    here is a simple example.

    I want to store the number 1415926535.
    All I do, is write this down : "1,10"

    Now, I could give the "1,10" to any computer in the world, and it could calculat pi to the first place, the tenth place, and everywhere inbetween, and it would have my sequence of numbers.

    Since we would probably not want to store that number (when converted into binary/hex it probably uncompresses to complete gibberish), we would need to find out what deciumal place a say, 4 trillion digit long number starts at in pi, and the number it stops.
    The resulting file would probably be around 100 megs, because sequences of numbers we want dont happen to often.

    The way to calculate this would of course be quantum computers, which could calculate each of these problems in exactly zero seconds flat.

    We could compress files in a ratio billions to one.

    Yea, I know there is probably a gigantic flaw in this that any amateur mathematician could spot, but its my two cents on the limitations of computing.
     
  18. 01001010 ... unique ... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    49
    that's a very good idea. As you said, there are some flaws, but i could see something to that effect somewhere in the future.
     
  19. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Sounds good to me too. Let us see if a mathematician punches a hole through it.

    This is similar to, I think, fractal mathematics. A series of numbers can be represented by a fractal formula that can be stored easily where it can be uncompressed to the full series.
     
  20. 01001010 ... unique ... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    49
    how perseptive.
     
  21. SeekerOfTruth Unemployed, but Looking Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    358
    kmguru,

    There are actually several companies out there now pursuing flexible displays. If I recall accurately, Xerox, Palo Alto Research center was one of the research groups who had developed some interesting stuff. These flexible displays are printed on polymers, which gives them their flexibility.
     
  22. kmguru Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,757
    Xerox? are you kidding? Everything they develop, they lose it. They have a problem differentiating their A** from the hole in the ground!

    BTW, Oraganic LEDs developed by Kodak, if married to polymer flexibility can have very interesting applications. That brings me to an idea: I wonder if we could put a clear liquid polymer in a large cylinder and use multiple IR or UV laser to light up the focus points (changing the frequency of light) thus creating true 3 dimensional movies?
     
  23. SeekerOfTruth Unemployed, but Looking Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    358
    kmguru,

    There is a company out there that has actually produced a 3-D imaging system. I will try to find the link to it that I found a month ago.

    But as just an overview of the technology, what they actuall do is to place an image on a flat panel that sits in what looks like a crystal ball. The panel rotates at very high speed inside the ball and as it rotates, the image changes to the perspective you would see from the angle at which the panel is currently positioned. You get a true, 3-D picture that you can actually walk around. It was pretty interesting. They had only done work on stationary images, but with some appropriate camera setups, and some interferometry, you could easily develop 3-D movies.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page