Food Expiration Dates

Discussion in 'Science & Society' started by StrangerInAStrangeLand, Jun 29, 2015.

  1. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    13,103
    .
    Fish oil liquid soft gel 1200 mg, still sealed. Expiration date : June 2013.
    Good or bad? Iffy? Deadly? Fishy?

    .
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    They're probably just completely useless now.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,154
    Why do you think so ?
    If the container is sealed and no light gets in why should it affect the chemical.
    I will assume if the oil gets bad it will increase in viscosity
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,464
    Thermal degradation?
     
  8. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,485
    Bust open a capsule and smell it.
    Your nose could probably give you better advice than you'll find in here.
     
    sideshowbob likes this.
  9. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,154
    Well it depend if it was exposed to higher temperature then ambient .
    In the opening post it was mentioned jelly, change in viscosity , That would mean it could had some thermal history and changes might have taken place
     
  10. danshawen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    http://www.iflscience.com/health-an...most-capsules-don-t-contain-what-they-promise

    This product evidently depends on some degradation inside the capsules in order for the specific homeopathic substances desired to be released, but the quality evidently varies greatly from brand to brand and from batch to batch.

    If it worked consistently enough, it would be recognized and produced as though it were a regulated pharmaceutical substance. Since it is not, you takes your chances. Might work. Might not. Even if it's a fraud, there's always the possibility of a placebo effect.
     
  11. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

    Messages:
    24,690
    Are you really going to put something in your stomach that has been at room temperature for two years beyond its expiration date??? How much did you pay for this stuff that it's worth the risk of food poisoning?

    Last time I got food poisoning (in 1987, from Colonel Sanders's chicken, which I will never eat again) I had to take a day off work--a very unpleasant day!

    A few months? Sure, okay. But twenty-four months??? This is an obvious case of "better safe than sorry."
     
  12. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,952
    There are minor reactions going on all the time, regardless of changes in temperature, etc. Those reactions may have products whose concentration reaches undesirable and/or dangerous after the "best before" date.
     
  13. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,485
    ancillary
    I have some sculpting materials which were claimed to have a shelf life of one year. They have been kept sealed in their containers which were kept in cardboard boxes which were kept isolated in individual wooden bins. Well over 10 years for most and 15 years for some, they are still usable.
    (but, I don't eat that stuff)
     
  14. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,154
    I think in material is in a powder form there will be less chances for reaction to take place , unless the packaging os paper and moisture permeate.
     
  15. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,952
    Less but not zero.
     
  16. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,154
    You are right
     

Share This Page