Defining Intelligence

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by Rick, Nov 30, 2001.

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  1. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    WHAT IS INTELLIGENCE?
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    definition by OXFORD DICTIONARY:
    the ability to acquire or apply knowledge and skills.
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    scientists disagree on various facts.however there is agreement on one point:intelligence has many components.any intelligent creature can do the following:

    1.)learn and retain the learned knowledge.

    2.)reason on the basis of knowledge.

    3.)Adapt to new circumstances.

    4.)communicate.

    5.)Recognize patterns.
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    the turing test:
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    so how do we know that a computer is intelligent?in 1950s Turing,a british scientist envisioned a test to measure intelligence
    of a computer.in this a person sits at a computer and types questions.the computer is connected to two hidden computers,at one human being gives responses,the other computer is programmed with automated response.if person typing the question cant tell difference between the human's answers and computers answers,Turing said the computer is intelligent.
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    the computer have long ago passed this type of test,eg ELIZA written by Joseph ...program which mimicks a human therapist.eg:
    if i write, i love my mom,it will respond by saying:tell me more about your mom,where it presumes MOM to be a keyword.
    Today,the programs are far more complex,does that mean that they are intelligent?
     
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  3. FA_Q2 Member Registered Senior Member

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    no. Intelligence would require some sort of thought, and application of leaned material. 1 – 3
    basically say the same thing. Computers have intelligence when they can be presented with a problem outside of their programming and still cope with it.
     
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  5. kmguru Staff Member

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    I have the ELIZA program. It does not pass the test. May be for a child but not for people of today as opposed to 1950. There was another clever program linked in this forum. It too does not pass muster. You can easily trick the computer to show its true colors by repeating the same or similar answers. I modified the Eliza program to act on the trick but still, it is a stupid program and only depended on my programmed input. Basically you program it to all possible combination of expectations with random variations.

    If you ask a child to draw an apple, sometimes they will draw an apple with a bite into it. At other times, the picture will not be repeated. Unless you program a random combinations and outcomes, a computer will repeat the same thing over and over. Even though you can program a computer to mimic a human and hopefully act intelligent, that days are way down the road. I should know - because we may not start the phase I for a DoD project till March and we have a long way to go to Phase III before I will feel comfortable that we got something - provided DoD pays for Phase III which will run into millions.
     
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  7. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    I have this understanding of intelligence as not just being able to work out a puzzle, but to survive. Afterall the only reason why the intelligence of a creature increases is to survive in it's climate.

    This is why tests involving rats that press buttons to get food could be classed as super intelligent in comparison to their counterparts. This could also be percieved as an an intelligence inducer when a dog plays fetch.

    This gives an understanding to me that a intelligent being is able to way up it's correct to incorrect directions, where an incorrect direction is spawned it's only pro is giving it the memory not to make the same mistake again, while a correct answer meas they try to remember the correct answer for any future re-occurances of that question.

    To cut it short if you were to have an evolution algorythm parallel processing through a neural networked compressed into a singularity, then you would have a machine housing a evolutionary algorythm that was intelligent and would gain in intelligence.

    Of course you could have got this all from Oxfords Definition, couldn't of you????
     
  8. tony1 Jesus is Lord Registered Senior Member

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    *Originally posted by zion
    the turing test:
    ==============================================
    so how do we know that a computer is intelligent?in 1950s Turing,a british scientist envisioned a test to measure intelligence
    of a computer.in this a person sits at a computer and types questions.the computer is connected to two hidden computers,at one human being gives responses,the other computer is programmed with automated response.if person typing the question cant tell difference between the human's answers and computers answers,Turing said the computer is intelligent.
    ==============================================
    *

    Turing got it backwards.
    If the human can't tell the difference between a computer's responses and the human's responses, the human is merely less intelligent than the programmer relative to the subject under question, rather than the computer being intelligent.

    *Originally posted by Stryderunknown
    To cut it short if you were to have an evolution algorythm parallel processing through a neural networked compressed into a singularity, then you would have a machine housing a evolutionary algorythm that was intelligent and would gain in intelligence.
    *

    Buzzword central.
     
  9. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    Re: Re: Defining Intelligence

    ACTUALLY you"re right.infact what turing envisioned was just his view point that failed as time progressed.

    bye!
     
  10. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Tony1

    Better Buzz words than Buzz off!
     
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