Dangers of high pulse [230s and above]

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by aaqucnaona, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Shogun Bleed White and Blue! Valued Senior Member

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    7,635
    Nice, I never learned how to slide on railings though

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    I just run, jump and dive forwards and do a regular shoulder roll

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    Sometimes it hurts in rugby (football I have pads) but its grass and its a try, so worth celebrating!

    Thanks, I can see how PK can help me in being a better at football or rugby, I'd take a look at which techniques can help me dodging and jumping over defenders.
     
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  3. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    I dont slide down them. I swing from them. Like u do in monkey bars, but the difference being u swing only once and u swing along the stair, downwards.
     
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  5. Shogun Bleed White and Blue! Valued Senior Member

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    What the fuck! Serious?!

    Holy shit...

    I looked at PK videos and yeah, it would be more useful to have one more option then to lower my shoulders and drive. I like the technique where you jump and roll over top the person, if I can do that then...man...well the receivers would hate my ass more then they already do, cuz out of the backfield I'm like a tight-end/slotback, so I also get a lot of passes in addition to hand-offs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
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  7. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    What exactly is this a reaction to?
     
  8. Shogun Bleed White and Blue! Valued Senior Member

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    The way you go down stairs lol
     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    24,690
    In the U.S. we use 220 instead of 210. And not only should you not exceed that, but you shouldn't even reach it more than a few times in your whole life, unless you're a professional athlete being monitored diligently by a doctor.
    Most of our charts show 65%-85% as the allowable range. If you go above 85% for more than a minute, you should cut back on the load.

    I've had a treadmill stress-test, hooked up to an oscilloscope, with a nurse practitioner watching constantly. In that case she took my pulse up to 100% for several minutes, but she was also monitoring my breathing, sweat and general condition. I had to be able to talk the whole time, not in a conversational tone but at least do it. This was a follow-up to an anomaly on my EKG, which turned out not to be dire--one of the doubly-redundant circuits in my heart was only singly redundant, so I'll only live to be 150 instead of 225.
    The answer is, "Yes you do!" Unless you're under supervision of a coach you should not get your heart above 85% of your maximum (which at your age is about 175), and you should NEVER get it above your maximum of 203!
    That doesn't make sense. If you work out that hard every day your heart should be very large and strong. Your resting pulse should be down in the 50's, maybe even lower. I mean geeze dude, I'm 68 and I only work out moderately for one hour three times a week, yet MY resting pulse is 60!
    And what we're trying to do here is convince you to get some professional attention for these highly anomalous readings before it becomes a medical emergency!

    Hey guy, Asgard is a professional EMT/Paramedic/Ambo whatever they call 'em where you live, and he knows what he's talking about. You'd be wise to take his advice.
     
  10. WillNever Valued Senior Member

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    Not always true. In very well conditioned people, sinus bradycardia can be normal. Besides that, having a heart rate below 60 can also be the sign of a diseased heart, especially if you don't exercise vigorously. In older people, that is often the case.

    Source: I'm an RN who works on a cardiac telemetry floor at my hospital. I watch between 10 and 20 heart monitors at a time sometimes, and I know pretty much every cardiac dysrhythmia that exists out there. I have seen people's (mostly seniors) heart rate's dip into the 50's, 40's, and even 30's during sleep, and they would be asymptomatic, and it wasn't because their heart was "large and strong." It was due to damage in the electroconductive pathways in their hearts.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
  11. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    Ok, I will monitor my heart rate for a day or two, many times and day and let you know how it stands.
     
  12. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    Look if your concerened then see a doctor who can do (or get done) a 12 lead ECG, cardiac stress test, full bloods ect

    The reason I have stayed out except to question your methods is because to me its not concerning. You haven't stated having anyother symptoms such as shortness of breath or chest pain at the time of tjese episodes, you also haven't counted your pulse for a full min and lastly if it was really troubling you you would be calling an ambulance, not discussing it on a message board. We never male a diognosis off 1 symptom unless its your femor coming out of your leg, we always look for pattens in results and basically your stating that the only issue is the heart rate itself. If you were stating other symptoms such as: vison problems, dizyness, tingling in the limbs, chest pain, shortness of breath, head ache, then i would say go see doctor imidiatly but if the only issue is the rate itself tjen if its concerning you get it checked, if not then dont worry about it. Unless will disagrees concidering hes a cardiac nurse


    The ammusing thing about the whole thread is the arm chair cardiologists
     
  13. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    It not very difficult. Try it your self. For the average flight of 10 steps, the vertical distance is 8-9 feet and the horizontal distance is 14-15. Once u let go, u only have to fall 3-4 feet downwards and 5-6 feet forwards. U can control direction while swinging by using your hands. Its simple, effecient and easy.
     
  14. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    Ok, guys.
    100 metre sprint at 31 kmph highest, 27 kmph average.

    I measured pulse at cartoid for 15 seconds:

    after sprint
    186

    1minute
    158

    2 min
    124

    5 min
    112

    15 min
    98

    30 min
    88

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    Fraggle, WillNever;
    any comments?

    Ps. I think my previous methods were horribly flawed and I never went above 210-215.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
  15. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    In otherwords your normal
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
  16. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    Did u see the graph I made?
    Its normal to have a pulse of 88 even half an hour after a 100 metre sprint?
     
  17. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    Yep your probably just not as fit as you would like to hope you are, a "normal" heart rate for an adult is between 60-100 some people have lower and some higher and if your so focused on this being an issue you could actually be increasing it through stress. As i said, unless you have any other symptoms concurrently with the increased heart rate stop stressing
     
  18. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    And that's the best thing you can say to reduce someone's stress?

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    But Lol,
    maybe I just have a high metabolic rate, a high heart rate or a couple extra percentages of body fat.

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    Its not a problem. As my training progresses, I will probably see some improvement.
     
  19. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    My resting pulse has always been in the high 60s, at least for the past 40 years since I've been exercising regularly. It was 59 once. So I don't think I have anything to worry about.
    I could ask my wife to take my pulse while I'm sleeping. But it would be easier for me to take hers since she sleeps more than I do.
    If you're 20 or less, those numbers look okay. 186 is 93% of your maximum; you wouldn't want to go above that for more than a minute or so. If you do, I would strongly suggest that you make an appointment with a sports doctor instead of posting your question on an internet forum.

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    I am certainly glad to hear that. Nonetheless, 210-215 is 105%-107% of your recommended maximum--if you're 20. If you're 25 then you're pushing 110%. This is not recommended, to put it mildly!

    I still recommend that you see a sports doctor. These guys understand that you want to push yourself, so they're not going to tell you to back off and get your pulse into a range that would be healthy for a 50 year-old office worker whose only exercise is walking to the subway station. They realize that you want to work hard and that you're willing to take a certain level of risk for it. But I still think your numbers are just a little too high. I really wish you would let a doctor see you in person.

    Remember, just because a doctor tells you to do something, doesn't mean you have to do it. (Otherwise there would not be so many people who smoke or overeat.

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    ) Listen to him and then make up your own mind. If he tells you everything is okay, then so much the better!
    You've seen pulses above 210???
     
  20. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    Fraggle, I am 17. So I think everything is fine afterall.
     
  21. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

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    I rather doubt that taking your pulse 1/2 hour after doing a 100 yd dash really counts as a 'resting heart rate', at least not according to other sources I have read, as in the instructions that came with my mother's heart rate monitor.

    It suggests that one take their resting heart rate first thing upon awakening, prior to getting out of bed, and to do this several days in a row to get a true average figure.
     
  22. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    24,690
    That means that your maximum allowable heart rate is 203, and the highest it should go without being under the care of a coach, trainer or doctor is 85% of that, which is 173.

    Not such a big difference! Your readings are still far too high to not be consulting a doctor or other professional.
     
  23. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    Yes but only in someone who was symptomatic, they were in SVT (super ventricular tachycardia) but the reason we were called was the dizyness, chest pain etc. There could well be 100s of people in the community with SVT who are a symptomatic and as long as the heart and the head are being perfused (ie no neurological symptoms, no chest pain and no shortness of breath etc) I wouldn't be concerned. In most people (except SOME women and diabetics for the most part) pain is a good indicator. I think i have said 4 or 5 times now get it checked out if its worrying you but don't stress to much.

    HOWEVER on that comment specifically, I draw your attention to the post DIRECTLY ABOVE MINE:

    Considering he is still using a 15 second method this is probably inaccurate, with him being asymptomatic I would say its probably less than that, hence my comment:

     

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