Body Temperature

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by John99, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Both, John. Again, though - every *living* cell produces heat.
     
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  3. John99 Banned Banned

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    In your estimation, how much heat for 98 degree temperature?
     
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  5. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    Deliberate lies or simply mistaken?
    John99 plays the ingénue...

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
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  7. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    I can't be certain because it would depend on the individual and the environmental conditions. For example, someone lazy living on the Equator vs. an Eskimo doing hard manual labor.

    But on average it would require someone burning around 2000 - 3000 calories of food (fuel) per day.
     
  8. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

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    Like fresh mixed concrete . Next time you pour a drive way and the sun goes down go put your hand on it . It will be warm from the reaction of the concrete setting up . Think of your self as a battery . Like your car battery . Now when it is drawing power put your hand on the battery . See what you get . Now consider your cell phone . Pick it up while it is charging . You feel any thing strange going on there .

    Did you not ever make a battery out of a lemon before ?

    Kids do not put your hand on a car battery . Your mommy will beat you if you do . Just a word of advise
     
  9. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

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    Mechanical engineer on board . Or a heating and cooling person that understands differential. That is how I think of it . It is all relative to outside temperature. Heating water is the same . That is why you got to do heat loss calculations .
     
  10. John99 Banned Banned

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    "It will be warm from the reaction of the concrete setting up "

    If you pour concrete in a cool basement the conctete setting up will get warm?
     
  11. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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  12. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    John, chemical reactions can produce a lot of heat. When oxygen and hydrogen combine in a the nozzel of a rocket that is a chemical reaction.

    When you are sitting around a camp fire the heat you feel is from a chemical reaction.

    The chemical reaction in concrete will in fact warm the cement.
     
  13. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, and there's something very interesting about that process that everyone isn't aware of. While building the Hoover (Boulder) Dam, engineers knew the heat buildup from the continuous-pouring process was going to cause serious problems. And the pouring HAD to be continuous for each new "layer" to bond with the previous one. In order to beat the problem, They embedded cooling pipes in the entire structure and circulated water through them during the construction and for a *considerable* time after the last of the concrete had been poured.
     
  14. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    Here is one of the major reactions in the hardening of cement.

    2 Ca3SiO5 + 7 H2O ---> 3 CaO.2SiO2.4H2O + 3 Ca(OH)2 + 173.6kJ

    Notice the 173.6 kJ? That is the major source of the heat from the exothermic reaction.

    Notice the Ca(OH)2? That is calcium hydroxide - which is why it is a good idea to wear gloves when working with cement. It is also the reason that if you don't wear gloves your fingers feel like someone sanded them with 60 grit sandpaper.
     
  15. John99 Banned Banned

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    Yes, chemical reactions can and do alter temperature. Both higher and lower.
     
  16. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Your body produces between about 80 and 2000 watts of heat depending on what you are doing. Sleeping is about 80 watts; 2000 watts would be a sprinter during a run.
     
  17. John99 Banned Banned

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    Seems high.

    Is the temperature uniform throughout the body or does the torso generate most of the heat. Since this is where most of the chemical reactions take place and also the head\brain.
     
  18. John99 Banned Banned

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    Bill, is a finger the same temperature as areas closer to the stomach?
     
  19. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    What is with all of these questions? Is there some place you are going with this or do you find it easier to just ask questions here instead of doing a little bit of research on your own?
     
  20. John99 Banned Banned

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    ah, well the question was not just for you then.
     
  21. wlminex Banned Banned

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    . . . . YES . . . due to exothermic chemical reaction of the 'setting' process . . .
     
  22. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    It is high - which is why a runner may be sweating like crazy even when it's 60F out.

    Temperature is relatively similar throughout the body. During cold weather your extremeties get a little colder, but not by much. (i.e. your skin might be at 70F, your subcutaneous fat might be 75F, your thenar muscle might be 80F.) Your core (organs, brain) remain very close to 98F unless something is seriously wrong, as in cases of hypothermia.

    Most of the heat is generated in your organs, primarily liver and brain. Your muscles also generate heat when they are being used. As mentioned earlier, keep in mind that heat is not the same as temperature.

    No, see above.
     
  23. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

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    That was probably to prevent "cold joints " Now we have additives to slow curing down to what ever you want . So precise that they can mix it to set up as the work force desires . We also have additives to speed up curing also . It does disrupt P.S.I. strength to a degree , yet all and all concrete technology has come a long way in development due to the need of concrete in building structures that can stand up to natural disaster . O.K. does warm blooded mean anything to yeah . That seems like a plausible delivery system to transfer heat. Do we call it warm blooded for a reason ?
     

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