Bigfoot photos, video, and eyewitness accounts!

Discussion in 'UFOs, Ghosts and Monsters' started by Magical Realist, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Quite. All the defence has to do is introduce "reasonable doubt" about the evidence, in the minds of the jury.

    It is the prosecution that has to prove, beyond reasonable doubt, that its evidence is true.

    And a video that looks, frankly, like some bloke in a bear suit is not going to convince many jurors.

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  3. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    If a prosecutor presented a video of Bigfoot robbing a 7-11, the defense could protest that the video was faked - but everybody would still understand that it was a guy in a Bigfoot suit.
     
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  5. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Except that the legal system has nothing to do with how science works.
     
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  7. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    Well, this is a science site and scientific standards are more stringent than legal ones, but for MR to start following ANY kind if intellectual/honesty standards would be a vast improvement. Besides, the alien spaceship issue isn't exclusively in the scientific domain.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
  8. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    You haven't raised any reason to doubt the evidence I've posted so far. Just saying something could be faked isn't reasonable doubt either. Example: DNA evidence proves the defendent did it. But the defense claims the DNA evidence could be faked. That's not reasonable doubt.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
  9. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    I'm claiming these are evidence for the existence of Bigfoot, which is what they indeed are. That's all I have to provide. The evidence. If you have a claim that it isn't evidence, then support it. On what basis do you deny the evidence? What additional facts prove it to be something else? An examination of the footage? A discounting of the photographer's credibility? Support your claim, if it indeed can be supported.
     
  10. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    If the prosecutor presented a video of Bigfoot at all, that's what it would be--a video of Bigfoot. The claim that it was faked would have to be supported by some evidence. That's the way it works.
     
  11. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    You haven't presented any evidence for bigfoot. You presented anecdotal evidence for something that made strange noises.
     
  12. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    Along with two eyewitness accounts of the beast on that island. That's pretty good evidence.
     
  13. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    No it's not, it's faulty evidence.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 15, 2016
  14. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    POCATELLO — “Bigfoot Captured,” a documentary set to premiere on the History Channel on Monday, 11-9-15, has Idaho State University’s prints all over it.

    ISU anthropology and anatomy professor Jeff Meldrum offers his insights on the program, which delves into the possibility of Bigfoot existing and uses scientific evidence to back up that claim.

    But Meldrum isn’t the only one from the university with their hands on the production of the History Channel special. The Idaho State University Robotics and Communication Systems Engineering Technology program built an 8-foot-tall Bigfoot skeleton using a series of 3D printers.

    “To actually stand next to it was really, really quite amazing,” Meldrum said. “Even this was a bit of an academic exercise because obviously everything is just inferential, but what it conveys is that otherwise difficult-to-imagine sensation or impression of standing next to a skeleton that’s 8 feet tall. I mean it’s huge — massive.”

    Because no actual Bigfoot skeletons have been unearthed, Meldrum had to reconstruct it based on what Bigfoot researchers believe the creature is related to.

    Meldrum borrowed from the physical looks of extinct animals such as the Gigantopithecus blacki — an ancient ape that was twice the size of apes today — and the Neanderthal — a species of human that is said to have became extinct 40,000 years ago.

    Meldrum took the Neanderthal skeleton, and technicians from the Idaho Virtualization Laboratory on ISU’s campus — under Meldrum’s guidance — digitally manipulated the skeleton to reflect the Bigfoot captured in the famous Patterson-Gimlin film.

    “They made the shoulders much broader, the torso thicker, the arms longer, the legs the right proportion,” Meldrum said. “Then we took the Neanderthal skull away because it’s more human-like.”

    So what did Meldrum and his team replace for the Bigfoot skeleton’s skull? They borrowed that from the likes of the Paranthropus boisei, an ape-like creature that roamed eastern Africa until about 1.2 million years ago. That skull is robust, wide, and it fit the look Meldrum was going for.

    “We came up with a pretty interesting model, one that agreed with the creature that was depicted in the Patterson-Gimlin film,” Meldrum said.

    Following the digital model’s completion, on it went to be printed, which proved not to be a straightforward task. A 3-D printer works by feeding a type of plastic twine into a head. The head heats the plastic and spits it out, similar to a hot-glue gun. The head is assigned X-Y coordinates and lays down layers of the plastic, which harden. When the head finishes one plane, it begins on another.

    Garen Call is an assistant in ISU’s robotics and communications program, and the History Channel contacted him to help undertake the project..."====http://www.idahostatejournal.com/me...cle_14d0b75e-85fc-11e5-94cb-a3512597bfc6.html
     
  15. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    So they pull a design out of their ass and say "this is bigfoot and this made-up skeleton proves it"?

    Pathetic.
     
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  16. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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  17. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Nobody, I mean, nobody, relies on videos from YouTube as evidence.
     
  18. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Isn't that the dude who ADMITTED it was a hoax?
     
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    No, that isn't the way it works. As I said, the court would assume that it was a guy in a Bigfoot suit. That's the default position. We know there are guys in Bigfoot suits; we DON'T know whether there are real Bigfeet. Until there is real evidence of Bigfeet, videos and eyewitness accounts are worthless.
     
  20. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    You've already provided all the reasonable doubt needed, MR. You've acknowledged:
    1. Videos and photos can be faked.
    2. The event being recorded can be faked or have another more reasonable explanation
    3. The videos you've provided are on Youtube and therefore not original and inherrently impossible to verify source, equipment, editing, etc because all of that information is stripped in the process of posting it to Youtube.

    All of that is plenty for reasonable doubt.
    That's not reasonable doubt for DNA because everyone knows DNA evidence is reliable. But it is reasonable doubt for a Youtube video because everyone - including you - knows it is inherrently unreliable (both the video and the content). MR, You have to know what you are saying is stupid. You're not a spectacularly gullible and irrational idiot. Stop pretending to be.
    Anyone who has ever watched a detective show (Law and Order?) or legal movie (A Few Good Men?) knows that isn't how it works. C'mon, MR, you're not that stupid - stop pretending to be.
     
  21. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    No..just because videos are posted on Youtube doesn't make them unreliable. I can watch any number of reliable videos from that source at any time. Historical videos. News videos. Science videos. The claim that because something is on Youtube therefore it must be fake is a copout and you know it.

    As I've already pointed out, any evidence can be faked. DNA evidence. Fingerprints. Footprints. But that doesn't make that evidence unreliable. The evidence remains evidence UNTIL it is proven to be faked. Just saying it could be faked isn't reasonable doubt. It isn't anything.
     
  22. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Post one incident so we can analyze it. We can't possibly be expected to debunk them all at once, that's an unreasonable debate tactic called the Gish Gallop. You are trying to overwhelm the forum with a large quantity of bad evidence thinking it adds up to good evidence, but it doesn't work that way. Bigfoot is a cultural icon now, and plenty of people fool around with the idea.
     
  23. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    This thread has been active for 2 years now. In that time nobody has given me any reason to doubt the veracity of the videos, audios, or reports. Don't complain about there being too many encounters and then ask for another one. Why would one more make a difference? I WILL refer you to the soccer playing teens on that island seeing a Bigfoot walking past the gym. That's pretty strong evidence there.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2015

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