Answer the question.

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Beaconator, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    Again, you are using the words "spread out energy." What the hell is spread out energy?
     
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  3. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    Are you trying to claim the earth and the sun are both in motion?
     
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  5. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    What do you not understand? The heat energy of the water is spread out over all of the water molecules. The heat energy of the ice is spread out over all of the ice mlecules, When water and ice interact, heat energy flows from water to ice, melting the ice. The distribution of energy is what's changing. Flow causes a change in distribution.
     
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  7. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Are you trolling?
     
  8. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    For the 3rd time, I do not understand what you mean when you say a distribution of energy. For example, a unit of energy is 1 kilowatt-hour. How can a kilowatt-hour be distributed unevenly, for example?
     
  9. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    No, are you? What is energy distribution? Are you claiming the earth and sun are both in motion at the same time? How about an honest answer instead of avoiding the question?
     
  10. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Okay, let's start at the beginning: Where is the energy? Where is that kilowatt-hour?
     
  11. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    You tell me, you said energy distribution. So how is 1 kw-hr distributed? Your words not working so well for you?? Too much Discovery Channel?
     
  12. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Of course they are. I found it hard to believe that you didn't know that.
     
  13. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    In motion compared to what? The sun and the earth are both in motion in space? So each has their own motion in space?
     
  14. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Say we have an electrochemical cell, copper on one side, zinc on the other. The zinc reacts with the electrolyte and positive ions go into solution, leaving a surplus of electrons on the zinc electrode. Those electrons are a "pile of energy". If we hook enough cells together and connect them to a circuit, one kilowatt-hour is the quantity of electrons that passes a point in the circuit in one hour.
     
  15. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Yes. Of course, only the earth's rotation is relevant to the example, which itself is not relevant to the topic. It was only intended as an example of the distinction between an event and the things to which the event happens.
     
  16. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    A pile of energy? Really??? So 1 pile=what, 1 kw-hr? So a gallon of gas is a pile of energy too! How is the energy distributed in the gallon of gas?
     
  17. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    It's relevant because I can't let you get away with talking garbage. You said it, I get to analyze it! Now, how is it that if the earth is in motion and light always travels at the same speed that it takes 1/299792458 of a second for light to travel 1 meter on earth? How is that possible?
     
  18. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    A kilowatt-hour is a measure of how big the pile is.

    Well, the chemcal bonds in the gasoline contain the energy. Any substance is a pile of energy. It's just easier to relese it from some substances than thers.

    The energy is more or less evenly distributed among the molecules. Since gasoline is a mixture of compunds, roughly from pentane to octane, some molecues do contain more chemical energy than others. but on a macroscopic level the distibution is flat.
     
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    What?
     
  20. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    How does the time of hour come into play? There is a gallon of gas at 10 AM. Is it gone at 11AM?

    Energy is power*time. A kilowatt is a unit of power (work/time) and an hour is a unit of time. While you may think a pile of gas is energy, it is NOT, it is POTENTIAL ENERGY! Potential energy has a distribution?
     
  21. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

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    5,105
    You confused?
     
  22. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Kilowatt-hours apply to electricity, not gasoline. A kilowatt-hour is the rate of flow of electrons.

    Yes, it's chemical potential energy.

    All enegy must be distributed. It has to "be" somewhere.
     
  23. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    I can't make any sense of your question. Are you seriously suggesting that the earth isn't moving?
     

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