60's NASCAR Racing ENGINES

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by river, Jul 17, 2015.

  1. river Valued Senior Member

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    We are all familar with the 426 Hemi but what is little known is this;

    Road and track racingEdit
    In 1963, the 427 Galaxies dominated NASCAR. Tiny Lund won the first and biggest race of the year, the Daytona 500, with 427s finishing first through fifth. Ford won 23 races to Plymouth's 19. The Plymouths earned all their victories on the short tracks while Ford dominated the super speedways, Chevrolet finished with eight wins and Pontiac had four.

    In 1964, Ford had their best season ever, with 30 wins. Dodge was second with 14, while Plymouth had 12. Adding the five wins that Mercury had, the 427 had a total of 35 NASCAR Grand National wins for the 1964 season. Fred Lorenzen won the Atlanta 500 and proceeded to beat Dodges and Plymouths, which were using 426 Hemi engines, contrary to stated NASCAR rules, in six of the next seven races. Ford was using the high-riser intake and matching heads, which were allowed by NASCAR for one season (1964).

    In 1965, NASCAR banned Ford's high-riser engines claiming they did not actually fit under "stock" hoods, allowing Chrysler to continue racing its 426 Hemi, which had never been installed in a production vehicle until that year.[4] Also in 1965, Ford developed its own version of a hemi-chambered engine. The 427 "Cammer" used a pair of overhead cams to operate the valves in its hemi. NASCAR banned the engine. Then Ford developed the medium-riser intake and head, which did fit under stock hoods, and was accepted by NASCAR. During that same year, Chrysler installed its first 426 Hemis in production cars, and the race was on. Ned Jarrett, driving for Ford, was the 1965 Grand National champion and Ford won the NASCAR crown.

    Also in 1965, Ford, in conjunction with Carroll Shelby, began production of a new and improved Cobra, meant for racing. This version utilized a 427 cubic inch side-oiler version of the FE in place of the original's 289 cubic inch smallblock. A new chassis was built using 4" main chassis tubes (up from 3") and coil spring suspension all around. The new car also had wide fenders and a larger radiator opening. It was powered by the "side oiler" Ford 427 engine (7.0 L) rated at 425 bhp (317 kW), which provided a top speed of 164 mph (262 km/h) in the standard model and 485 bhp (362 kW) with a top speed of 185 mph (298 km/h) in the competition model. Cobra Mark III production began on 1 January 1965, and it was used for racing continuously into the 1970s. A street-legal version was sold by Ford, called S/C for semi-competition, an original example can currently sell for 1.5 million USD, making it one of the most valuable Cobra variants.[5]

    In 1966, the 427 cubic inch GT40 Mk II dominated the 24 Hours of Le Mans race, with a one-two-three result.

    In 1967, Parnelli Jones, in a Holman-Moody prepped Fairlane, won the season-opening Riverside 500 road race. Then,Mario Andretti captured the Daytona 500 in a Fairlane, with Fred Lorenzen a close second in his Holman-Moody Ford. The FE again powered the 24 Hours of Le Mans winner. In 1968, the rules of the race were changed, limiting displacement to 302 cubic inches under certain circumstances. Ford won the following two years using its smallblockin the GT40.

    Ford's racing partner, privately owned Holman-Moody, also developed a version of the FE for the Can-Am racing series. This version of the FE used factory supplied tunnel port heads, a mechanical fuel injection system mounted on a crossram intake manifold, and a revised dry sump oiling system. Only limited success was achieved in this series.
     
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  3. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    The Ford 385 engine family (the name coming from the 3.85 inch crankshaft stroke of the 460 V8[citation needed]) was the Ford Motor Company's final big block V8 engine design, replacing the Ford MEL engine and gradually superseding the Ford FE engine family. This design was a departure from the paradigm utilizing thinwall casting methods and a skirtless block to reduce weight.
    It was available in three sizes in production vehicles; 370 cu in (6.1 L) in medium-duty trucks only, 429 cu in (7.0 L) and 460 cu in (7.5 L). A 514 cu in (8.4 L) crate engine was also available from Ford SVO.


    The engines were sold between 1968 and 1997. It was introduced in the Lincoln Continental (460) and Ford Thunderbird (429) in 1968 and replaced the FE in Ford's full-size cars in 1969. Production ended with the ninth generation Ford F-Series truck in the 1996/7 model year. They were manufactured at Ford's Lima Engine plant at Lima, Ohio. This manufacturing line replaced the Ford MEL engine line in the Lima plant. The FE engines, manufactured in Dearborn, continued in production but saw reduced applications and volume as the 385 engine gradually took over in the Ford line up. The FE went out of production in 1976, leaving the 385 as the only big block. The 370 replaced the 361 FE in 1978 and the 429 replaced the Super Duty (401/477/534) engines in 1982.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...1I34DA&usg=AFQjCNFKI8myrwTTgqPFM15KYlBgUQxmTw
     
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  5. river Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for response cosmic.

    The reason though that I made the thread is to show that Ford had in the end , at least in the 60's , Ford had a better engine than Chryslers 426 Hemi engine.

    Ford bring back that engine.
     
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  7. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    Official Photos and Info
    “Engineered to keep company with exotics” is how Ford modestly refers to its bombshell 2015 Detroit auto show debut, the GT hypercar. The concept’s appearance wasn’t a huge surprise, as we learned months ago that Ford was taking a new GT to Le Mans in 2016, and such a car must be homologated. But as it slinked onto a stage at Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena, Ford kept feeding us a host of stats that had our jaws opening wider by the second. It packs more than 600 horsepower. It utilizes full carbon-fiber construction and body panels. It has active aerodynamics. The new GT is poised to not only keep company with other exotics, but perhaps also force them to up their game.
    Chevrolet Corvette Z06, Chevy Camaro Z/28, Porsche 918 Spyder, Ferrari LaFerrari, McLaren P1, and Ford’s own Shelby Mustang GT350, we were floored. It’s not just the Ford’s sultry styling—we’ll get to that shortly—it’s the sheer brassiness of the thing. To the carbon-fiber monocoque Ford’s engineers bolted front and rear subframes made from aluminum. The active aerodynamic elements include a multiposition rear wing that mimics the caboose-tamers of the P1 and LaFerrari to help keep Ford’s mid-engine supercar planted at speed. The suspension is active and uses inboard, pushrod-actuated damping, and ride height is adjustable.

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    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...C_s6AF&usg=AFQjCNHnp8xMLlr4CCzjB7iVTFkMtQZkOA
     
  8. river Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks again Cosmic
     
  9. river Valued Senior Member

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    427 SOHC "Cammer"Edit

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    SOHC engine showing cam, rockers and timing chains

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    Examples of racing 427 SOHC's
    The Ford Single Overhead Cam (SOHC) 427 V8 engine, familiarly known as the "Cammer",[34] was released in 1964 to maintain NASCAR dominance and to counter the Chrysler 426 Hemi "elephant" engine with its extremely large block casting. The Ford 427 block was closer dimensionally to the smaller 392 cu. in. early Hemi; the Ford FE's bore spacing was 4.63 in (117.6 mm) compared to the Chrysler 392's bore spacing of 4.5625 in (115.9 mm). The Ford FE's deck height of 10.17 in (258.3 mm) was lower than that of the Chrysler 392 at 10.87 in (276.1 mm). For comparison, the 426 Hemi has a deck height of 10.72 in (272.3 mm) and bore spacing of 4.8 in (121.9 mm); both Chrysler Hemis have decks more than 0.5 in (12.7 mm) taller than the FE.

    The engine was based on the high performance 427 side-oiler block, providing race-proven durability. The block and associated parts were largely unchanged, the main difference being use of an idler shaft instead of the camshaft in the block, which necessitated plugging the remaining camshaft bearing oiling holes.[citation needed]

    The heads were newly designed cast-iron items with hemispherical combustion chambers and a single overhead camshaft over each head, operating shaft-mounted roller rocker arms. The valvetrain consisted of valves larger than those on Ford wedge head engines, made out ofstainless steel and with sodium-filled exhaust valves to prevent the valve heads from burning, and dual valve springs. This design allowed for high volumetric efficiency at high engine speed.[citation needed]

    The idler shaft in the block in place of the camshaft was driven by the timing chain and drove the distributor and oil pump in conventional fashion. An additional sprocket on this shaft drove a second timing chain, 6 ft (1.8 m) long, which drove both overhead camshafts. The length of this chain made precision timing of the camshafts an issue to be considered at high rpms.[citation needed]

    The engine also had a dual-point distributor with a transistorized ignition amplifier system, running 12 amps of current through a high-output ignition coil.[citation needed]

    The engines were essentially hand-built with racing in mind. Combustion chambers were fully machined to reduce variability. Nevertheless, Ford recommended blueprinting the engines before use in racing applications.[citation needed]With a single four-barrel carburetor they were rated at 616 horsepower (459 kW) at 7,000 rpm & 515 lb·ft (698 N·m) of torque @ 3,800 rpm, and while equipped with dual four-barrel carburetors they made 657 horsepower (490 kW) at 7,500 rpm & 575 lb·ft (780 N·m) of torque @ 4,200 rpm. Ford sold them via the parts counter, the single four-barrel model as part C6AE-6007-363S, the dual carburetor model as part C6AE-6007-359J for $2350.00 (as of October, 1968). Weight of the engine was 680 lb (308 kg).[35]

    Ford's hopes were cut short, however. Although Ford sold enough to have the design homologated, NASCAR, after protests by Chrysler Corp., effectively legislated the SOHC engine out of competition.[citation needed] The awaited 1965 SOHC versus Hemi competition at the Daytona 500 season opener never occurred. This was the only engine ever banned from NASCAR.[citation needed] Nevertheless, the SOHC 427 found its niche in drag racing, powering many altered-wheelbase A/FX Mustangs (after NHRA banned it from stock classes),[34] and becoming the basis for a handful of supercharged Top Fuel dragsters, including those of Connie Kalitta, Pete Robinson, and Lou Baney (driven by Don "the Snake" Prudhomme). In 1967 Connie Kalitta's SOHC-powered "Bounty Hunter" slingshot dragster won Top Fuel honors at AHRA, NHRA and NASCAR winter meets, becoming the only "triple crown" winner in drag racing history.[36] It was also used in numerous nitro funny cars including those of Jack Chrisman, "Dyno" Don Nicholson, Eddie Schartman, Kenz & Leslie, and in numerous injected gasoline drag racing vehicles.

    Just to add , Ford had an fantastic engine that many , including me , although I knew of the 427 Wedge, are not aware of .

    If Ford brings back this engine , look out Hemi's!!!!!
     
  10. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    So if you can't beat them you eliminate them with rules that remove them from competition. Nice way to run a race, not! The rules, to me, are bent in favor of Chevy almost in every racing event. To me Chevy have paid off the officials to give them an edge just look at NASCAR and how many wins Chevy has as compared to Ford. That's why most people get a Chevy to race with for they are getting preferred treatment. I can't prove my point because only the officials can be allowed to examine the race cars so if there were any discrepancies they would be overlooked.
     
  11. river Valued Senior Member

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    Note Taken and I will be watching NASCAR races more closely .

    Again thanks Cosmic
     
  12. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    2004Kurt BuschJack Roush97Ford36 (36)32116506 (8)
    2005Tony StewartJoe Gibbs20Chevrolet52536533 (35)
    2006Jimmie JohnsonJeff Gordon, Rick Hendrick Chevy482416475 (56)
    20071046723 (77)Chevy
    200872266684 (69)Chevy
    20096492 (141)Chevy
    201062326622 (39)
    2011Tony StewartGeChevyne Haas, Tony Stewart Chevy 1451912403 (0)
    2012Brad KeselowskiRoger Penske2Dodge2302400 (39)
    2013Jimmie JohnsonJeff Gordon, Rick Hendrick48Chevrolet
    2014 Chevy
    2015. Chevy

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprint_Cup_Series#Winston_Cup


    Notice anything strange that the Chevy owned drivers are taking everything almost. That would raise attention to what is going on I would think, don't you?
     
  13. river Valued Senior Member

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    I did but I not much of it. I assumed of course that the better team won.

    Anyway I will be watching !!!!
     
  14. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    YearDriverOwner(s)Car
    No.MakeStarts
    (Total Races)WinsTop
    10sPolesPoints
    (margin)
    2004Kurt BuschJack Roush97Ford36 (36)32116506 (8)
    2005Tony StewartJoe Gibbs20Chevrolet52536533 (35)
    2006Jimmie JohnsonJeff Gordon, Rick Hendrick482416475 (56)
    20071046723 (77)
    200872266684 (69)
    20096492 (141)
    201062326622 (39)
    2011Tony StewartGene Haas, Tony Stewart1451912403 (0)
    2012Brad KeselowskiRoger Penske2Dodge2302400 (39)
    2013Jimmie JohnsonJeff Gordon, Rick Hendrick48Chevrolet

    The best CHEATING team won, to me, and won't stop because GM owns NASCAR.
     
  15. river Valued Senior Member

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    Really , GM owns NASCAR , figuratively or literally? It never occured to me. Though I wondered why so many chev's were used by majority of teams.
     
  16. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    Look at the security vehicles at the tracks, look at what the owners are driving that own the tracks, look at how many good fords are taken out in wrecks on the track to let the Chevy win. I've seen so many things that Chevy are being used for by officials at the tracks it makes me wonder why no one else picks up on this cheating that is happening. As I said I can
    t prove anything other than what I can see for it is being covered up so that GM gets its way, bullies they aqre, I don't watch it that much any longer due to what I've been saying. Look at the amount of people at the tracks, the numbers are getting lower at every race during the past 5 years.

    Watch Jimmy take the championship or another Chevy this year but it won't change and if it did it wouldn't last for long letting another manufacturer other than Chevy won't be tolerated by the bullies at GM.
     
  17. river Valued Senior Member

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    We'll see
     
  18. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    Chevy truck won last night, Chevy truck in 1st place in truck, Sprint and other race division. I bought a 50Annv. edition of NASCAR some time back and there were only 34 pictures of Fords in it, interesting isn't it. This isn't NASCAR this is GM and never forget it.
     
  19. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    IndyCar introduced a wild new aerodynamics package for both the Chevrolet and Honda cars this year, but the move has not gone so well. Chevrolet seems to have gotten the better deal, and has won nine of the 13 races run so far.
     

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