Why depression is booming amidst

dixonmassey

Valued Senior Member
materially prospering (relatively speaking) populations? What is forcing many people in the West to get hooked on Prosac? Is it just successful marketing brainwashing campaigns or there are deeper reasons? Any suggestions?
 
Maybe the breakdown of the family? People are feeling more and more isolated from each other. Perhaps in the lesser developed countries people rely on each other to a greater degree. In those countries, in order to survive, people must be connected with their families and friends--always helping out, always involved. In another thread "Why no one sees Hispanic/Asian bums," it was speculated those ethnic groups have more tight social bonds. They don't let family to go astray. Everyone is accounted for.

In America, it is not so much the case. There is more individual isolation. That's what does it. I don't think it's directly related to commercialism or material wealth. It's a problem of personal isolation.
 
materially prospering (relatively speaking) populations? What is forcing many people in the West to get hooked on Prosac? Is it just successful marketing brainwashing campaigns or there are deeper reasons? Any suggestions?
The only thing booming about depression is its diagnosis.

The “Western” world has convinced itself that if you’re not deliriously happy every waking moment of the day that there is something wrong.
In fact, if you’re not perfectly average there must be something wrong with you. Thus Prozac… only a few small steps from soma.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soma_%28Brave_New_World%29

~Raithere
 
There is a great book about this phenomenon that I urge every human being to read- "The Progress Paradox" Go get a copy today, it is a brilliant book.
 
The more time goes by, the more complicated the world gets. Its TRUE.
I don't reckon the human brain is evolving as fast as the world around us is, we aren't designed to cope with the magnitude of stuff we have to deal with and process etc. Depression could be a side-efect of this in some cases?
Also i believe diet plays a HUGE part in the majority of depression cases. And that all comes back to the body not being evolved enough to cope 100% with all the rubbish we are eating, and depression being a side effect.

I know I'll probably get shot down for this, but whatever, this is what I reckon. I'm don't claim to be any sort of rocket scientist.
 
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Maybe the breakdown of the family? People are feeling more and more isolated from each other. Perhaps in the lesser developed countries people rely on each other to a greater degree. In those countries, in order to survive, people must be connected with their families and friends--always helping out, always involved. ....
In America, it is not so much the case. There is more individual isolation. That's what does it. I don't think it's directly related to commercialism or material wealth. It's a problem of personal isolation.

I agree, Francois, Americans value "individualism" far above that of family and society. As such, we've lost and/or denied the very thing that actually makes up "society". Many feel that they can't turn to family or friends because it's a sign of loss of "individuality", of becoming dependent.

Good post,

Baron Max
 
My theory: absolute and complete boredom. By observation this happens a couple of major ways...power accomplishment and assimilation.

Power accomplishment - (the Alexander syndrome) whereby one reaches a pinnacle of conquest where one can raise no higher. This is the less occuring event, but still valid albeit for a smaller population.

Assimilation - (the Dilbert Zone). Where the common plebe has become trapped in a boring routine (office->home->office->home->office->home), simply to pay bills. This starvation of creativity and individuality (totally opposite to Max and francois' theory) can lead to depression.
 
Assimilation - (the Dilbert Zone). Where the common plebe has become trapped in a boring routine (office->home->office->home->office->home), simply to pay bills. This starvation of creativity and individuality (totally opposite to Max and francois' theory) can lead to depression.

Wouldn't creativity and individuality be a spontaneous attribute of a personality as opposed to society?

What I mean is, aren't creativity and individuality something innate in each person? If they're not creative, or have no need to be an 'individual', then that's their problem, not society's, right?

Or are you saying that if society places more importance on the arts, more and people are sucked into the creativity vacuum?
 
No I'm saying that the necessity to earn money to survive in a capitalist environment causes (some) folks to starve their innate creativity/individuality...if you've only got time (like Dilbert) to go to the office, and go home and pay bills for your house and car to continue working so that you can go to the office - and that's your entire week Monday to Friday...for years...is there any wonder why depression is becoming rampant?
 
The “Western” world has convinced itself that if you’re not deliriously happy every waking moment of the day that there is something wrong.

Not everywhere. In Finland or Sweden it is a cultural tradition to be seriously sad, if not competitively masochistic. Otherwise they think there's something wrong with you.
 
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mean cold cruel people, stupid people, evil, perverted, moronic, nasty, dishonest religious people etc etc etc.
 
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You people should read Kaczynski's "Industrial Society and Its Future". Here's a relevent sample,

THE POWER PROCESS

33. Human beings have a need (probably based in biology) for something that we will call the "power process." This is closely related to the need for power (which is widely recognized) but is not quite the same thing. The power process has four elements. The three most clear-cut of these we call goal, effort and attainment of goal. (Everyone needs to have goals whose attainment requires effort, and needs to succeed in attaining at least some of his goals.) The fourth element is more difficult to define and may not be necessary for everyone. We call it autonomy and will discuss it later (paragraphs 42-44).

34. Consider the hypothetical case of a man who can have anything he wants just by wishing for it. Such a man has power, but he will develop serious psychological problems. At first he will have a lot of fun, but by and by he will become acutely bored and demoralized. Eventually he may become clinically depressed. History shows that leisured aristocracies tend to become decadent. This is not true of fighting aristocracies that have to struggle to maintain their power. But leisured, secure aristocracies that have no need to exert themselves usually become bored, hedonistic and demoralized, even though they have power. This shows that power is not enough. One must have goals toward which to exercise one's power.

35. Everyone has goals; if nothing else, to obtain the physical necessities of life: food, water and whatever clothing and shelter are made necessary by the climate. But the leisured aristocrat obtains these things without effort. Hence his boredom and demoralization.

36. Nonattainment of important goals results in death if the goals are physical necessities, and in frustration if nonattainment of the goals is compatible with survival. Consistent failure to attain goals throughout life results in defeatism, low self-esteem or depression.

37. Thus, in order to avoid serious psychological problems, a human being needs goals whose attainment requires effort, and he must have a reasonable rate of success in attaining his goals.
 
Too much fish oil, laced with mercury.

Well, there are a handful of studies showing that as fish consumption goes down, depression goes up. In addition, numerous studies have show that increasing fish consumption relieves (or even cures) most depressed individuals. Fish also has many benefits for those that are bipolar.
 
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