Vitamin D Deficiency

justwonderingjoe

Gosh,the weather is nice today
Registered Senior Member
I just got back my blood serum level for Vitamin D. It was: 8 (very low) :eek:

(The test measured Vitamin D3, 25-hydroxy, & Vitamin D2, 25-hydroxy.)

Normal is anywhere between 30 to 80.

The doctor I work for put me on a Rx for Vitamin D, once a week for 2 months.

Does anyone have any experience with this?
From what I understand, this is an extremely low level.

I walk, eat healthy, and I'm not over weight. I sometimes get tired out after mild exercise and my muscles hurt after garden work, but I attributed that to middle age!

Should I see an Endocrinologist or another type of specialist? Should I just take the Rx and forget about pursuing a specialist?

I've Googled this, but I am more confused now. ( I guess more scared)
Any advice/information would be really helpful - Thanks
 
Yes. I walk outside for about an hour on Sundays, I also sit outside when it's nice. I don't think it's related to lack of outside exposure. I think, I'm not sure?
 
About 15 minutes everyday will give you all the D you need for the day, assuming your body has the ability to make it. If you (your body) really have a problem with this, then you will need to supplement.
 
So, should I take the supplement? (I'm super deficient.) How do I know if my body can manufacture D on my own? Should I try sitting outside for 15 mins a day, for say, 2 weeks straight and then re-test?
Are the supplements dangerous?
 
All supplements could be dangerous.

Since your vitamin D levels are so low, it might be best to take the supplements as prescribed, and during that time also make sure to get into the habit to spend more time outside to get more sunlight - but more than just 15 minutes.
 
All supplements could be dangerous.

Since your vitamin D levels are so low, it might be best to take the supplements as prescribed, and during that time also make sure to get into the habit to spend more time outside to get more sunlight - but more than just 15 minutes.

Do you think I should consult a specialist? Considering how low the level is. Do you know if this could mean something else is wrong?
 
With any type of illness or deficiency, it is hard to predict its exact course and extent for an individual person.

It could be that what your doctor has prescribed you will work just fine, and there is nothing else wrong. It could also be that something else is wrong.

Generally with medical treatments, the course of action is to start with a likely treatment; and then if that one doesn't show successful, start another one.

I would suggest you ask your doctor for more information.
 
With any type of illness or deficiency, it is hard to predict its exact course and extent for an individual person.

It could be that what your doctor has prescribed you will work just fine, and there is nothing else wrong. It could also be that something else is wrong.

Generally with medical treatments, the course of action is to start with a likely treatment; and then if that one doesn't show successful, start another one.

I would suggest you ask your doctor for more information.

thanks for the input. I'm going to take the Rx.
 
I was diagnosed the same about three months ago, and the doc put me on a Vitamin D bomb (50,000 IU) once a week for two months and then once a month after. My level was at 7 when I was tested. A lot of people are D deficient, more than people realize because it's not a normal test.

Take the Rx, I have never felt better in my life. No aches and pains like I used to have, I'm not so tired in the evenings, I have an easier time getting up in the morning and generally I feel healthier. I haven't caught the three viruses people have been passing around and I feel like I am thinking more clearly and have more motivation.

It was my endocrinologist that prescribed mine. I would suggest getting tested after those two months and seeing what your levels are then. If it's still way down, you might have bigger issues. I am still on the 50k once a month, but I take 1000 IU in the morning and evening now.
 
I just wish to re-check something:

I've looked up some resources on the internet, and it seems the only resource of vitamin D in the form of commonly eaten foodstuffs is meat (mostly fish), and mushrooms.

1. In order for the body to produce vitamin D, is it necessary to eat meat (mostly fish)?

2. Is the essential factor in proper vitamin D production exposure to sufficient sunlight (provided the person doesn't have any other diseases that could cause vitamin D deficiency)?
 
I just wish to re-check something:

I've looked up some resources on the internet, and it seems the only resource of vitamin D in the form of commonly eaten foodstuffs is meat (mostly fish), and mushrooms.

1. In order for the body to produce vitamin D, is it necessary to eat meat (mostly fish)?

2. Is the essential factor in proper vitamin D production exposure to sufficient sunlight (provided the person doesn't have any other diseases that could cause vitamin D deficiency)?

Your skin makes vitamin D under the influence of UV-light. Normally no supplements are needed (and that includes natural sources such as fish).
 
Is it possible to 'catch up' or 'store' vitamin D?
Say, if you work indoors the whole day and get practically no sunlight during the day - if you go outside on the weekend and spend several hours in the sun - is it possible to catch up that way?
 
I already know about the 15 mins outside everyday produces vitamin D.

Now I got a couple questions, that might be stupid but.....

What if it is cloudy?

What if you wear sunscreen all over, does that have an affect?
 
Last edited:
Signal - yup. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, so your body can store it in its own fat tissue.

Yes. I walk outside for about an hour on Sundays, I also sit outside when it's nice. I don't think it's related to lack of outside exposure. I think, I'm not sure?

Still not enough. Also it depends on your latitude. For example in Canada, the winter sun isn't strong enough to give all you need, especially if you're exposing just your head and hands. You could survive on that, but low vitamin D is associated with much higher risk of cancer, diabetes, MS and other diseases.

How old are you? Are you fit? Any liver problems?
If you have a fatty liver, orally taken vitamin D can get trapped in the liver and become toxic. If you're fit, then definitely go on the Rx... otherwise you can get a vitamin D cream that you rub onto the skin which skips the liver.

Shorty
UV rays can still get through on a cloudy day. Sunscreen will stop it though. Oh and BTW.. 15 minutes is *not* enough. Especially in Canada..
 
Shorty
UV rays can still get through on a cloudy day. Sunscreen will stop it though. Oh and BTW.. 15 minutes is *not* enough. Especially in Canada..

I know they still come through on a cloudy day, but I wondered if you would have to be out a lot longer then the 15 mins. I see that you don't agree that 15 mins is long enough anyway. Does it also matter how much of your skin is exposed? is your hands and face even good enough?

Yeah well here in Canada we had +12 and sunny on Sunday and Monday back to friggen freezing rain, blowing snow and a crazy wind that won't let up. :eek:
 
Vitamin D status is affected by many things.

1. You need UV B radiation, which is poor beyond the tropics.

2. You need at least 20 minutes of exposure daily in full sunlight with optimal UVB which produces about 20,000 IU of vitamin D

3. You need to not be wearing any protection on your skin since UVB is blocked by most sunscreens and probably even by clothes. Also by clouds, pollution and anything that blocks UV radiation.

4. We don't know what is the normal vitamin D level and we don't have sufficient information to declare what is toxic

5. We don't know if ingestion by the oral route has identical metabolic effects as subdermal production.

Generall speaking below 30 nmol is low and above 80 nmol is good. Which works out to 2000 to 8000 IU per day, depending on season and location. Current recommendations are 400 IU per day.
 
Just wanted to emphasize this:

http://esi-topics.com/nhp/2006/march-06-BruceWHollis.html said:
Vitamin D is made in huge amounts when we go into intense sun. A fair-skinned individual can produce approximately 20,000 IU in 10 minutes’ time with a total body exposure.

A person with significant pigmentation will require up to 10 times the exposure to make an equivalent amount.

In the winter at the latitude of Chicago, even a fair person cannot photo-produce vitamin D from mid-October through March.

So those 10-15 minutes that tend to be mentioned as the sufficient dosis are actually under the conditions of 1. being in intense sunlight, 2. being fair-skinned, 3. with total body exposure.
 
Last edited:
Back
Top