Zero Point Unreachable? Think again!

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by GammaMatrix, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. GammaMatrix Banned Banned

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  3. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Moderator

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    Note that it isn't about cooling something more and more and eventually reaching T=0 but rather constructing a system which behaves in the opposite manner. It's a somewhat novel concept of temperature, not quite aligned with the usual one. You don't make such temperatures by just sucking more and more temperature/heat out of something, you have to construct them in entirely novel ways.

    Similar quirky things happen with black holes, since pumping energy into it raises its mass, which lowers its temperature, causing a run away effect. You can view this as having a negative heat capacity, since the black hole has an emission temperature in line with other black bodies.
     
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  5. eram Sciengineer Valued Senior Member

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    The system created by the experiment is indeed novel, but I think calling it below abs zero sounds contradictory. Quirky.
     
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  7. Crunchy Cat F-in' *meow* baby!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Great articles GammaMatrix!
     
  8. GammaMatrix Banned Banned

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    Why thank you...




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  9. GammaMatrix Banned Banned

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    Which would be expected in the mechanical sense, since very small black holes have very large temperatures. Then it goes by deduction that very large ones will be very cold.
     
  10. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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  11. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Moderator

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    Not really, it could be small ones are very hot and big ones extremely hot, small things being hot doesn't imply their bigger versions are colder. There's no way to say unless you have the black hole models to explore. The result follows immediately once the definition of a black hole's temperature is seen to be inversely related to its mass, nothing 'mechanical' there.
     

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