your thoughts....

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by JimmyJames, Oct 27, 2001.

  1. JimmyJames Master Jedi Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    60
    Hello everyone, I have been gone for some time now. Now I have a question and I would like your input. I would like to know your thoughts on artificial gravity and how it could be accomplished. I also have heard of a 5th state of matter and wanted to know what you guys have heard about. I have been writing a report about warp engines and how I think it could be accomplished. Kinda of space age, but if we don't start now when will we? Okay...back on track. I will soon post my thoughts on the subject, but I just wanted to though out some of my ideas to stir up some conversation. Inlight of the current U.S. situation, I would like to sent out my regrets to anyone who was hurt by the terrorist attacks, It really makes me mad to see people who only want to cause problems. I did see a funny thing today on the internet (nothing to do with science) at madblast.com - click on "Bin Laden Can't run or hide" Well I think thats all talk to you later. -bye-
     
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  3. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

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    General Relativity: artificial gravity by way of acceleration/angular momentum.

    Futurespeak: graviton generator. Maybe a very small black hole you send in the direction through space you want to go and then you follow it very close so that you have real gravity during the trip.

    It's rather a bad way to do artificial gravity if the galaxy is filled with populated planets that your blackhole bullet might eventually hit.

    Then again, ....
     
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  5. Crisp Gone 4ever Registered Senior Member

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    Hi JimmyJames,

    The fifth state of matter you refer to is called the Bose-Einstein condensate (the four other states are solid, liquid, gas and plasma). You probably heard it in the news somewhere because the Nobel prize in Physics was awarded to research on the BE-condensate

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    .

    The BE condensate is a special state of a type of particles we call "bosons" (in technical, quantummechanical words: these are particles that have an integer spin value). Some examples of bosons we know are photons (the light-"particles") or the 2He-nucleus (a Helium atom with all the electrons left out). There's also a second kind of particles called "fermions" (which have a half-integer spin value), with the typical example being the electron.

    The main difference between bosons and fermions is that fermions obey the Pauli exclusion principle. This principle states that in a closed system (for example, the electrons bound to a nucleus), no two electrons can have the same configuration. If you have one electron that has a certain energy, angular momentum and spin, then no other electron in that system can have the same energy, same angular momentum and same spin. This is way electrons in atoms all have different "orbits".

    Bosons however, do not obey the Paul exclusion principle. If you would consider a system of bosons, then they can all have the same energy, angular momentum and spin. In particular, all boson particles can have the lowest possible energy in the system (we say that the bosons are in the groundstate of the systems). When almost all bosons in this system are in the groundstate, you have a Bose-Einstein condensate (condensate refers to the fact that they all have the lowest possible energy).

    The Bose-Einstein condensate has been predicited in theory for quite some time already. Most of its properties have been known for over 50 years.

    That's about everything I can tell about what the BE-condensate is. The Nobel prize was awarded this year to an experimental investigation of the properties and characteristics of the condensate. (I'm not quite up to date on the exact characteristics that were studied, but I am sure you can find that on the web somewhere).

    Bye!

    Crisp
     
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  7. Benji Registered Senior Member

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    306
    You want warp engines eh?
    You dont want for much do you?

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    Well just creat an engine that can bend space time in a mannor which would propel the craft in which ever direction you point it.
    Easier said then done, but we aint finished yet.
    Then you will need to creat a shield of some kind to protect the craft from the affects of altering space time, i have no idea on what these affect are or would be.
    So to sum up, i havent a clue, good luck with your paper.
     
  8. kmguru Staff Member

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    11,757
    Hi Crisp:

    if we generate a large quantity of photons, we light up the football field, in case of electron, we get electricity and magnetism. If we generate a large quantity of bosons or fermions, what do we get? Any practical value?
     
  9. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

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    5,109
    <<...a large quantity of bosons or fermions, what do we get? Any practical value?...>>

    Together? It depends on who you are.

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  10. Reign_of_Error Registered Senior Member

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    kmguru
    I think Crisp gave examples of what you are saying here already, I may be off the mark, if so, I apologise.

    if I read this correctly, then bosons are examples of photons and fermions of electrons.

    This is great reading, I love learning

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  11. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

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    Yes. Fermions are particles of matter, Bosons are particles of energy/force.
     
  12. John Devers (AVATAR) Registered Senior Member

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    Hi Jimmy James, there are 5 states of matter, Plasma, gas, liquid, solid and BEC.

    There may be some stange new things to discover here yet.


    <A HREF="http://www.nature.com/nature/links/010719/010719-2.html" target=new><FONT COLOR=Lime size=+1> From the send to a friend section Nature science updates. </FONT></A>

    Bose-Einstein condensates: Dynamics of 'bosenovae'
    Three forms of matter are familiar to us - solids, liquids and gases - and the fourth, plasmas, can be found in flames and other high-temperature systems.

    The 'fifth' form of matter, Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC), can take physicists into some very strange territory. In this low density state, ultra-cold atoms become virtually indistinguishable from one another other, creating a 'superatom'. Donley et al. exposed a condensate made with rubidium-85 atoms to a changing magnetic field to observe its quantum mechanical behaviour as the interatomic forces change.

    At one extreme the condensate first shrinks then undergoes a sudden explosion of atoms outwards - known in the quantum physics trade as a 'bosenova' or 'supernova in a bottle'. But much of the behaviour observed in this system runs counter to the predictions of current theories, so for the collapsing rubidium-85 condensate, revised explanations are needed. Implosion and explosion of a BEC bosenova can be seen in movie form at http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/bosenova.htm
     
  13. Crisp Gone 4ever Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,339
    Hi Mr. G.,

    "Yes. Fermions are particles of matter, Bosons are particles of energy/force."

    This is an incorrect generalization. It is true that just by coincidence (or maybe not, be sure to let us know if you know otherwise) all elementary particles that form regular matter, being the proton, neutron, electron, are fermions by itself. However, when you combine two protons (eg. the 2He nucleus) you get a boson with either spin 0 or spin 1. (regular matter = spin 1/2, and two of those can combine to 1/2 + 1/2 or 1/2 - 1/2). AFAIK 2He is still a matter particle.

    Bye!

    Crisp
     
  14. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

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    5,109
    Hi, Crisp,

    I've akways had a sneaking suspicion that someday science will find our pedantry gene.

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