Young Gas?

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by IceAgeCivilizations, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

    Messages:
    6,618
    1) "Permian" is how many supposed years ago?

    2) Why would it have to have been "long after buriel?"

    3) So, "many millions of years ago," well now, there sure are widespread gas wells in various regions, like half of Texas and Oklahoma, for instance, so those are "deposits which have been trapped by fortuitous juxtoposition...? Ahahaha.
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,799
    The La Brea Tar Pits are an example of petroleum that has leaked out. Under high pressure, the gas can get dissolved into the petroleum as well. This happens in lakes sometimes.

    There are some geologically stable places on Earth. Of course, that would preclude your Genesis "science".
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2006
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Laika Space Bitch Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    638
    The Permian began about 300 million years ago. I said that most hydrocarbons are derived from mesozoic sediments. This was a nit-pick and I freely admit that it is not entirely relevant to your opening post.

    Because burial to the requisite depth takes a long time. The hydrocarbon 'cooking' process doesn't begin as soon as the organic material is buried. Subsidence and sedimentation must occur before the source rock enters the hydrocarbon window. On an unrelated note, please don't introduce spelling mistakes into phrases you quote from my posts. I can do that myself.

    Do you have a specific problem with this notion? As long as the hydrocarbon trap is in existence before the hydrocarbons have finished migrating, some hydrocarbons will accumulate. If the trap is not destroyed between then and now, then the accumulation will persist. It's as simple as that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2006
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. swivel Sci-Fi Author Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,494
    I lean more towards the abiotic theories of oil formation. There's no way that 5-8 trillions of barrels of vegetation were preserved, rather than fed back into the carbon cycle.

    And hydro-carbons exist everywhere we look. In interstellar dust clouds, in meteorites, around thermal vents. The things grow like mad and with little prompting. It is much more likely that oil and gas are being produced from below rather than preserved from above.

    Besides, the latest estimates regarding the biomass of the Earth puts the majority of the biomass BELOW EARTH'S SURFACE. This has bizarre consequences for how we perceive life. These other organisms are called "Extremophiles", but they have found safety away from the murderous Sun and the toxic Oxygen and the roaming predators of the surface. It is now becoming more apparent that these organisms are Earth's majority life and WE are the Extremophiles!

    Great stuff. Look into the work being done at the Carnegie Institutes' laboratory for Life's Origins for more on the latest findings.
     
  8. Walter L. Wagner Cosmic Truth Seeker Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,526
    Coal is clearly from dead plants that failed to decay (in swamp water, etc.) and instead piled higher & deeper. It formed in seams separated by layers of rock. Fossil imprints of leaves, etc. are sometimes found in coal. Trace amounts C-14, likely from Uranium-daughter alphas striking B-10 (19.9% of Boron, the other 80.1% is B-11) are not an indication of a young deposition as some have claimed. The fact that coal has many layers, separated by solid rock, is evidence of swamps that filled in with sediment, then became swamps again, likely due to rising and falling sea-levels or changes in land elevation. Theories that a single "Deluge" floated all the vegetation to the surface of the water, and it was thereafter deposited as a coal layer, does not fly because that would form only one layer of coal, not many.

    Oil/Gas layers are another matter. Swivel has an interesting point, and it is quite possible that in addition to organic matter deposition in sediments, 'primordial' methane (present from Earth's formation) incorporated in the magmatic materials eventually work their way upwards, becoming trapped by a relatively impermeable layer(s), or so some investigations are suggesting as one possible source for such hyrdocarbons.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2006
  9. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

    Messages:
    6,618
    The Deluge coal deposits are between various strata, not surprisingly at all.
     
  10. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,502
    I believe that both the abiotic and biological origin theories are true. Methane and other hydrocarbons naturally occur on planets that at least in theory have no life. It is also produced by anaerobic fermentation.

    Coal seams can be seen forming wherever there is a peat bog that exists for long enough.
     
  11. Communist Hamster Cricetulus griseus leninus Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,022
    Why would a single flood deposit plant matter in several layers?
     
  12. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

    Messages:
    6,618
    Almost all the sedimentary strata, with billions of creatures entombed therein (99% of which are marine creatures), were Deluge caused.
     
  13. P. BOOM! Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    122
  14. Chatha big brown was screwed up Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,867
    I'm thinking Earthquakes and Volcanoes. Once in a while the Earth goes on a Volcano binge and the Eart is filled with volcanic eruptions. A million years ago the Earth as covered in Magma and sulphuric ash. Many planets have these characteristics, which can explain the lack of life. Its sort of like a cooking pot lid; you see a few jet streams for a while, then the lid is blown off. This is probably why some planets are gaseous.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2006
  15. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

    Messages:
    6,618
    "A million years ago, the Earth was covered in magma and sulphuric ash." Huh?

    And, anyway, that would have no bearing on hydrocarbons at depth.
     
  16. Chatha big brown was screwed up Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,867
    I'm confused
     
  17. Ophiolite Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,232
    That's true.
     

Share This Page