XP, making OEM into retail?

Discussion in 'Computer Science & Culture' started by weed_eater_guy, Mar 12, 2008.

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  1. weed_eater_guy It ain't broke, don't fix it! Registered Senior Member

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    Is there a way to make an OEM copy of Windows XP into a retail version, legally? I've gotten kinda fed up with vista after it ravaged my video driver after exiting a game... I've got an OEM copy of XP that came with my old computer and I've tried calling Microsoft to have them invalidate the thing from my old computer and let me install it to a new computer (maybe make the old one a linux-based something or other...), but they of course can't agree to that, the OEM copy came with the old computer, so I'm looking at other options.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. glaucon tending tangentially Moderator

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    You actually installed Vista?

    Eeek.

    Anyways..... I'm surprised you weren't sued by Microsoft for having an OEM OS. Technically speaking, an OEM OS is specifically sold for distribution to one Corporation, not private individuals, and as such, there is no 'legal' way for you to be in possession of such an OS.

    Regardless, I'm not sure what you're trying to achieve.
    Why don't you install the OS with the OEM Serial?
     
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  5. domesticated om Interplanetary homesteader Valued Senior Member

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    I'm thinking the [non-pirated keygen] answer is no.
    However, you should be able to install infinite copies of the same OEM disc without having to enter the product key as long as they are from the same manufacturer. Example --- you could use the same OEM copy of XP from DELL to install on all [newer] DELL computers (as many as you wanted).
    Unfortunately, it wont work if you try to do it on anything else. It will basically ask you for a non-existent product key during the relevant boot stage.

    I googled around, and found a couple of sites talking about copying the contents of the OEM disc to your hard drive, monkeying with some files (which turns it into a corp. volume licensed version), and burning it onto a new disc------but I think you need to purchase a volume license key or something.

    BTW -- If you decided to go out and buy a new retail copy of XP, I'd do it now. They stop selling them officially in June (forcing everybody to have to get used to that crap Vista OS).
     
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  7. 2inquisitive The Devil is in the details Registered Senior Member

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    There is not a legal way to use an OEM copy of XP on a different machine than it was first installed on. I built my prevous computer and bought an OEM copy of XP. When you purchase an OEM copy yourself (not a new computer with XP already installed), you do get a product key, but you can only use the copy on one machine, and you cannot upgrade the CPU or motherboard. Microsoft collects information about the CPU and motherboard during validation. You can reinstall the operating system on a new harddrive as long as the CPU and motherboard doesn't change. I did this myself after a harddrive failure.

    If you purchase the more expensive retail version, you can transfer the OS to new computers.

    On a side note, I bought a new HP notebook about three weeks ago and have not experienced any problems with VISTA. I am not a gamer though. There is supposed to be a new patch comming out for VISTA in a couple of months, similar in purpose to the SP2 upgrade of XP. You might possibly wait to see if the upgrade cures your problems before buying an older OS.
     
  8. domesticated om Interplanetary homesteader Valued Senior Member

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    Which manufacturer did you buy that OEM disc from?
     
  9. Repo Man Valued Senior Member

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    With an OEM copy, I've replaced the motherboard, called the center, explained that the motherboard died, and been given a new activation number. I've done this several times.
     
  10. RubiksMaster Real eyes realize real lies Registered Senior Member

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    This is a good suggestion. I've done this before too. Technically they don't have to do it, because there are rules in the license agreement about what hardware upgrades you're allowed to do without paying for a new key. If it doesn't work, try calling back when a different person will answer.

    In fact, I'm not sure they even de-activated my old key. All they asked for was my name when they answered the phone. They asked for my email address and they sent me a whole new key. I can't see how they could have possibly linked me to my key with just my name and an email address they've never seen.
     
  11. 2inquisitive The Devil is in the details Registered Senior Member

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