Xf-11, 2028ad

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Vega, Mar 1, 2008.

  1. Vega Banned Banned

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  3. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    How in the world did you come to that conclusion? 1997 XF11, at its largest, is estimated to have a diameter of 2.8 km. Even if we are generous with estimating its density, it can't mass over 5e13 kg. Even if it passed on the same side of the Earth as the Moon, so that it passed only 576,000 km from the Moon, it would only exert an acceleration on the moon of 1e-14 m/s² (that's 1/1000 of a nanometer per second squared.) and 3.7e-15 m/s² for the Earth. That's hardly anything that could result in "gravitational anomalies".
     
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  5. draqon Banned Banned

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    yeah I agree with Janus here...a thing that small causing anomalies? nahhh....
     
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  7. Vega Banned Banned

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    Indeed gentlemen, you are quite right according to textbook physics yet nobody understands the nature of composition of the core of this object and the resultant magnetic forces that would resonate from its centre when induced while passing between the earth and moon, furthermore how these forces would react under the circumstances.
     
  8. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    Unsubstantiated gobbley-gook.
    1. The projected path places it further away from the Earth than the Moon. (not passing between.

    2. Postulating that the core is made from some unknown and exotic material(and no known or predicted substance could create any substantial magnetic forces through a near approach) is not only unscientific, it is just plain silly.

    3. If such exotic materials existed and if the core were made of such, we'd already know it due to the asteroid's interaction with the Sun's magnetic field.
     

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