Would We Notice If DM Was At The Center Of The Earth?

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by common_sense_seeker, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    If dark matter existed at the center of the Earth, Moon and stars I propose that we wouldn't notice. All it would mean is that the calculations of their masses are all underestimates. It would be a potential solution for the Missing Mass Problem, would it not?
     
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  3. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    No, because then all of our observations which work with the masses we currently have would be made false.
     
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  5. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Of course not! As Steve just said, the numbers we have work VERY well - thank you for nothing.
     
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  7. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Better to propose something & be shot down than never shot down at all.
     
  8. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    It is true that we wouldn't notice dark matter inside the Earth unless it did something truly unique. It is untrue that our estimates of its mass would then be underestimates because our methods for estimating the mass of the planet already include all gravitating mass that is there. There may be no difference between gravity from dark matter and gravity from regular matter, which is why they theorize dark matter in the first place.
     
  9. DwayneD.L.Rabon Registered Senior Member

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    Well, My hunch about dark matter is that its just all the heavy atoms that are science has not accounted for, other solar systems have atoms that we do not have in our solar system, exspecially so for solar systems in the glaxatic arms ect... these unaccounted for heavy atoms are dark matter.


    DwayneD.L.Rabon
     
  10. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Just more sheer nonsense. Please show us proof of these "heavy atoms", Rabon.

    And incidentally, you aren't aware that we've done analysis of distant stars by spectroscope, are you?:bugeye:
     
  11. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    What's the point of this idea if it doesn't account for the missing mass in in the universe then?
     
  12. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    The next reply will be a waste of time...
     
  13. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for some lateral thinking, it makes a change to the standard responses. I believe there is a difference between the gravity from DM and that from regular matter. My simulation model shows that DM gravity is highly directional. In the case of the Sun, DM gravity is much higher in the ecliptic plane compared to the direction of it's spin axis for example. This explains the longevity of the disc shapes of the majority of the galaxies that are observed in my opinion.
     
  14. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for some lateral thinking, it makes a change to the standard responses. I believe there is a difference between the gravity from DM and that from regular matter. My simulation model shows that DM gravity is highly directional. In the case of the Sun, DM gravity is much higher in the ecliptic plane compared to the direction of it's spin axis for example. This explains the longevity of the disc shapes of the majority of the galaxies that are observed in my opinion.
     
  15. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    2,623

    Thanks for some lateral thinking, it makes a change to the standard responses. I believe there is a difference between the gravity from DM and that from regular matter. My simulation model shows that DM gravity is highly directional. In the case of the Sun, DM gravity is much higher in the ecliptic plane compared to the direction of it's spin axis for example. This explains the longevity of the disc shapes of the majority of the galaxies that are observed in my opinion.
     
  16. kaneda Actual Cynic Registered Senior Member

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    It is possible that gravity is not as uniform in all ways as we assume. One hundred one solar mass stars may exert much more gravitational force than one hundred solar mass star.

    If gravity had a directional component, I would say it pulled in an unknown direction which is why all large objects in space spin around.
     
  17. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    The spin of matter is due to it's origin in my opinion. Matter was born spinning. That's what energy is.
     
  18. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    They're talking about matter that we can't seem to measure except by its gravitational influence. I looked it up on Wikipedia and they say that the dark matter component is hypothesized to be larger than the baryonic matter component. Maybe the actual problem is that no one understands quantum mechanics.
     
  19. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    That's exactly right. The accepted Cavendish experimental results are simply wrong. On a scaled down version, the Earth would be about the size of your eye and the Moon would be the size of a pea held at arms length. If these were made of everyday magnets, there still wouldn't be enough attraction to sustain an orbit. Even the Wikipedia entry states that the repeats of the experiment have given highly varying results.
     
  20. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Would we notice DM if it doesn't exist?
     
  21. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    It's necessary to explain the nature of galaxies. Incidentally, not only have I deduced that DM exists at the center of the Earth, Moon and stars, but also at the center of atoms. The nucleus consists of dark matter in my theory.

    Cavendish's assumption of Newton's law has led to an inaccurate calculation of the Earth's average density in my opinion. I'm starting on the maths proof of my ideas from today.
     
  22. Saxion Banned Banned

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    Again, this is absolute nonesense. Most dark matter is suspected to have negative mass... and if it was in the center of the earth, it would blow the earth apart.
     
  23. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    Hoorah!
     

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