Word of the Day. Post it Here

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Captain Kremmen, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    "Prow" can also be replaced with "bow", which cannot be replaced with "bough", which cannot be replaced with"buff" or "bow" and "arrow", which cannot be replaced with "arrough", but can be partly used as "rough" which cannot be replaced with "ruff"......argghhh.......cough.......

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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2021
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  3. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    kenopsia

    ..................
    long ago, the nsa took over one wing of one of the 5 - 3 story buildings in site r.
    They filled it with tape machines recording calls---then more of them came, then more of them came-- a real hubub of activity---all those machines running and people comparing notes--they could not process the recordings, and would generate more in a day than they could process in a month----after a few weeks, they gave up and left----after that, the room was eerily silent all those now quiet machines, and no people, and the room lit only with the emergency lights

    spooky
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2021
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  5. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    moniker = name

    Why moniker?
     
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  7. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Why is a name called a moniker?
    https://www.thefreedictionary.com/moniker
     
  8. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    eg:
    sculptor, Write4U, Saint
    are all monikers
     
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  9. foghorn Registered Senior Member

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    Yes, a right bunch of monikers.
     
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  10. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    The Big Cheese

    https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/big cheese

    "
    The big cheese is the person who holds the most power in any situation. If you overhear someone at work describe you as "the big cheese," it means that he thinks of you as the most important person in the office.
    You might also call someone important the head honcho or the top dog. The idiomatic phrase big cheese comes from a definition of cheese that comes from Urdu, in which chiz means "a thing." The British colonization of India brought English speakers and Urdu speakers together, and one result was the phrase "the real chiz" to mean "a big thing or event." This evolved over time into big cheese"

    ...and I assumed it might refer to a particular odour

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  11. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    no stone unturned means what?
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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  13. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    hermeneutic

    adjective
    1. concerning interpretation, especially of the Bible or literary texts.
    noun
    1. a method or theory of interpretation.
    Definitions from Oxford Languages

    Spoken by the pope as part of an answer to a question

    To me the word has given him some wriggle room regarding the situation where

    he had accepted the resignation of the archbishop of Paris, Michel Aupetit, “not on the altar of truth but on the altar of hypocrisy.”

    https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2021/12/06/pope-francis-paris-archbishop-resignation-241970

    Business as usual. Many of these minor / major sordid issues (as he noted us plebs do not know the details) I am sure would be reduced if the church itself did not expend a lot of its energy within the sexual arena along with allowing its members a normal secular life style

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  14. wegs Matter and Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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  15. geordief Valued Senior Member

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  16. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Girlfriend

    This word when translated into Indonesian, through a Transaction App, comes out as Boyfriend. Boyfriend does not translate as Girlfriend

    Another English word if put in as individual word or used in sentence the app gives 10 Indonesian individual words or in a sentence a random word translation

    I don't think the app is picking context

    Anyone any clues? Only use the one app and not used Google Translate

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  17. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    "Boyfriend" gives me "pacar" or "gacokan" ,both of which it says mean either "boyfriend" or "girlfriend "

    That was google translate.

    There was another result "cowok" that only meant "boyfriend" and ,seemingly not "girlfriend " as well.
     
  18. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    When I put those 3 Indonesian words into the Indonesian -English box it "spits them out" and won't translate them into English.
     
  19. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    pacar in my Translation App gives me

    boyfriend

    girlfriend
    date
    love
    sweetheart
    sweety
    steady
    sweetie

    gacokan in my Translation App gives me

    preferred marble

    boyfriend
    girlfriend

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    Thanks to adding to my confusion

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    I guess meeting new Indonesian friend will look like my meeting a Chinese nurse when I was there

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    Each typing in what we wanted to say and letting WeChat - (Chinese version of Messenger which is not allowed in China) - to do its work

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  20. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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  21. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    Chivalrous: Courteous and gallant, especially towards women. (Typically used of a man and his behavior.)
     
  22. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Organic

    (agriculture)

    From the Wiktionary

    I thought it was just Of food or food products when meaning food stuff. Seems has been extended to being also growing in organic stuff free from artificial agrichemicals

    Only found out because my cereal was marked Organic on the package and I wondered why muesli was not a given as being organic. I also had a suspicion (now I know unfounded) it was a marketing ploy to get me to pay more

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  23. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    I think the French and some other Europeans call it "biologique" or bio-dynamiques" .

    But it is a moving goalpost as regulations defining who can sell as such can be changed from year to year.

    There are also different belief systems within the "organic industry" with some believing in planting by the moon and other such absurdities.(Prince Charles is famous for supposedly talking to his plants-I pity any of his audiences actually)


    "Organic" is also commonly used to refer to processes that develop of their own accord without intervention.

    A bit like things can develop from the bottom up rather than from the top down.
     

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