Woman sues cop who asked for date after giving ticket

Discussion in 'Ethics, Morality, & Justice' started by KilljoyKlown, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    This was bound to happen sooner or later and I can't say I'm sad to see it happen.

    Woman sues cop who asked for date after giving ticket
    "I know this seems crazy," he wrote in note he left on windshield outside her apartment

    http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/45860217#.TwSDNvI8dBm
     
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  3. Big Chiller Registered Senior Member

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    I haven't read the article but I think simply refusing and saying no to a date would suffice.
     
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  5. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    He waited a couple of days and went to her house and left a note. But you would have to think if he was going to ask for a date at the time , he would have let her off with a warning.

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  7. Big Chiller Registered Senior Member

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    Granted his actions do not follow through appropriately.
     
  8. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    As a guy how many times do you get off with a warning when pulled over? In the last 40 years I can only remember maybe getting 2 warnings. I had a very cute female friend that got stopped 4 or 5 times in one year and all of them were warnings. That doesn't make me feel very good about traffic cops. How would one go about complaining of unequal treatment? And if you did, is there any way you could prove it? And would you have to keep looking over your shoulder every time you got behind the wheel?

    If she wins the law suit, just maybe that unequal treatment will start to equalize a bit.

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  9. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    He used police records to track her down her address, find her car and leave a note on it. That's the problem.
     
  10. Big Chiller Registered Senior Member

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    Even so she could just not take legal actions against him I can see what the problem is.
     
  11. darksidZz Valued Senior Member

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    Pusssy does strange things to men they need antipusss llaw courses to prrevent favoritim and to teach it in schools as well i o however.See how thiss could be creepy he should hve aasked her during the stop
     
  12. Big Chiller Registered Senior Member

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    Maybe it would be inappropriate to ask when he stopped her to give her a warning it would even be unprofessional I believe but he should have let her off with a warning if he was going to ask her out on a date.
     
  13. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    At the time he wrote the ticket he just got her address off her license. But he used his position of authority to get that information. He had to know what he was doing was wrong and he did it anyway. Makes me wonder if he's done this before and if he was successful, you can be sure he would tell other cops he works with, and what works for one cop might work for others?
     
  14. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    From what I've learned talking to friends of mine who are cops it does indeed work (although I have yet to talk to anyone who actually went to someone's house and left a note on their car.)
     
  15. dumbest man on earth Real Eyes Realize Real Lies Valued Senior Member

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    From my experience, the majority of people in Law Enforcement are NOT in the upper tier of Intellectual Abilities, NOR what most people would designate; Completely Mentally or Personalitywise what would be called: Stable, plus most seem to posess an Elitist (Do as I say not Do as I do!!) attitude.
    Even the ability for low level thinking does not seem to be a prerequisite for the job. Even read somewhere lately that a person sued because they were turned down for a position in law enforcement because they SCORED TOO HIGH ON THE I.Q. TEST!!
    That being said, the Judicial system in this country seems to back up the Constabulary in these matters, so I do not see any more than a soft pat on the hand being levied against the officer - Heck, people have been murdered in unjustified shootings by Officers, with no "True Justice" being applied to them - so I would not be surprised if some sort of Unlawful or Unwarranted Lawsuit isn't turned around and thrown at the young lady!
    Also, now that she has "shown up on their Radar" - so to speak - there is a more than even chance that more tickets could very well be coming her way from "The Good Old Boys Club" of law enforcement.
    I do however, believe the Officer abused his powers, and hope the young lady is sucessful in her lawsuit.
    Just my $.02, but notice my moniker.
     
  16. darksidZz Valued Senior Member

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    I'm reminded of the woman that had a glass of wine at dinner then drove home and was supposedly DRUNK because she was laughing during the stop yet passes all his tests. Later on the news you had all sorta of experts testify that given the length of time and how little it was she couldn't possibly have been wasted but was more or less a giggly sort of gal
     
  17. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

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    At this point in time, it is still alleged that the policeman in question wrote the note.

    We have only the woman's side of the story being reported and no comment from the officer.

    I think I shall withhold comment until we know what he has to say, or if in fact he actually did write the note. :bugeye:
     
  18. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah! That note part was a bit much. But what I said about the favoritism shown to beautiful young women is true and it's not fair or professional, and that's most of the male traffic cops. I'm sure most of those cops won't step over the line and actually ask for a date. But just one bad cop could get the ball rolling and pull some of those other cops across the line. After all if they show favoritism they do have fantasies which make it easier to follow a stronger personality over the line.
     
  19. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    It's hard to believe the woman would make up a story like that. I mean that's a lot of trouble to put yourself through. True or not, most woman won't do it.

    I'd say the probability that the cop didn't do it is very small, and the news service that reported it has to check the information to make sure it's credible.

    Besides I'm interested in the behavior of people in a position of power over others. They do need to live up to a high standard and when they don't, they need to be prosecuted with special circumstances.
     
  20. adoucette Caca Occurs Valued Senior Member

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    I had the opposite reaction.

    The note supposedly said: "he would understand if Paredes did not get in touch"

    So apparently he simply put the ball in her court in a very unobtrusive and non-threatening way.
    If she wanted to meet him she could let him know and if not she didn't have to do anything.

    What I find interesting is this note was left Oct 22nd and there is no indication that she responded OR that he had any further contact save that one note.

    Which if true, then in my mind that is neither stalking or an abuse of power.

    But I am curious, if that is all there is to this, why wait over 2 months, and then file the suit?
     
  21. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    I don't think that a cop who misuses his authority to stalk a woman is "frivolous." But that's just me.
     
  22. quadraphonics Bloodthirsty Barbarian Valued Senior Member

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    Which is expected, given your reactionary authoritarian streak.

    There is nothing non-obtrusive or non-threatening about a police officer following you home after citing you and leaving notes on your car expressing sexual interest in you.

    Especially given the frequency of sexual harassment/rape by police officers who pull over female drivers for traffic violations/suspicion of DUI.

    If I were this officer's superior, he'd be out of work immediately.

    Not do anything, you mean, except justifiably worry about how this authority figure who had already tracked her down might respond to sexual rejection?

    The initial act of tracking her down and leaving a note was stalking and an abuse of power totally irrespective of anything that did or did not occur after that.

    Yeah, and just look at what that slut was wearing! Obviously she wanted it.
     
  23. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

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    Interesting that you mention high standards.

    As adoucette has pointed out, there has been quite an interval between the incident and the filing.

    Secondly, in my country, one is presumed innocent until proven guilty.

    Part of my job entails doing investigations and the first thing one learns is that things are seldom as simple as they may appear to be.

    Still, because it involves persons in authority, it is worthy of close examination to determine if there has BEEN any abuse of power.

    As others have pointed out, it is rather easy to track someone down these days if you know their name. The officer may simply have looked in the phone book.

    Or perhaps one of his friends thought it might be a great way to help him get a date? Men have a rather unique sense of humor....

    There are a few things that seem a bit odd about this and I'll be interesting to see what the whole story reveals.

    As for the credibility of news services....that is not worthy of comment. :bugeye:
     

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