Wolf Hunting Season to open in Sept

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by Orleander, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Well, if my brother still lived in Montana, I'm sure he would get one. I personally think they need to trap wolves from one area and move them to another. They needed a bit more genetic diversity before they were removed from protected status.

    Starting today, hunters can walk into any license vendor in Idaho and buy a tag to kill a gray wolf.

    Vendors such as Daniel Stephenson, owner of River of No Return Taxidermy in Salmon, Idaho, expect robust demand.

    "In our area, there're lots of [wolves] and they're not a real popular thing for deer and elk hunters," Stephenson said. "So everybody wants a chance to go get one."

    The Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved a plan August 17 to allow up to 220 wolves to be killed by the public this coming fall and winter. Licensed hunters will be allowed to kill wolves starting September 1. Most hunting will be finished by December 31.

    Montana, another state with a growing wolf population, already approved a 75-animal quota for its wolf hunt, which gets underway September 15 and lasts until November 29.

    Both hunts come just months after the predators were removed from protection under the federal Endangered Species Act....
     
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  3. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    That's one of the most underpopulated regions in the U.S. Where are they going to find an area whose residents welcome a new large predatory species, on top of the coyotes, bears and mountain lions that already prowl most of the country? Even where there are no livestock, people have pets. Wolves and dogs may be the same species, but they've had enough time to diverge genetically that apparently they don't exude quite the same bouquet of pheromones, and wolves regard dogs as prey.
    The wolf is arguably the second-most successful large animal on earth and there are populations all over the globe. I don't think genetic diversity is an issue. Just trap a few and exchange them between North America, Siberia and other habitats.
    I can understand why ranchers don't want wolves around. It cuts into their livelihood. But hunters? What kind of "sportsmen" don't welcome competition??? Are these the guys who hunt from helicopters while drinking beer, watching a football game, and texting their offices?
    Well I'm sure you can expect to see that policy come under scrutiny by the new Administration. They're more sympathetic to the Sierra Club than the NRA.

    Coyotes are faring much better than wolves. They're more tolerant, more curious, more adaptable, and arguably more intelligent. Even before the European occupation of the Americas they had already adapted from full-time hunters to scavenging garbage around Native American camps, something wolves do only as a last resort. When the colonists started building villages and cities, they must have thought they'd won the lottery. They routinely rummage through trash cans in Southwestern cities, knowing exactly which night to prowl each neighborhood, and they pick off the cats and small dogs along the way. They've even converted to a diurnal lifestyle, and they've learned to hold their tails up so people mistake them for stray dogs.

    They've been so successful that they're fanning out across the continent, taking over territory that once belonged to the wolf, such as the Northeast. They even emigrated into eastern Canada, where they encountered the beleaguered remnants of its wolf population, who were so down on their luck that they cross-bred with the coyotes.

    Now we've got these gigantic hybrid canines coming back across the Canadian border with a wolf's size and teeth but a coyote's cunning and tolerance for civilization.

    I think our deer problem will soon be taken care of! It's gotten so bad that in some cities it's impossible to grow a garden.
     
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  5. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    :bugeye: That's what I said. Trap wolves in one area and move them to another.
     
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  7. doodah Registered Senior Member

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    Being from Montana, and currently working in the wilds of Idaho- I couldn't resist this thread.

    Wolves have decimated game animals in large parts of Idaho and Montana. It's not a question of competition- even the wolves have left some areas they previously occupied for lack of prey.

    3 wolves just killed 120 sheep in the past week on one rancher's private ground near Dillon Montana.

    Don't know if you've ever seen a wolf kill? Not a pretty sight. Wolves hamstring their prey then rip open and devour the entrails while the animal is still alive. They usually leave the rest to rot.

    Hunting season for wolves- can't come soon enough as far as I'm concerned.
     
  8. pjdude1219 screw watergate i want to know about zaragate Valued Senior Member

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    kill people and keep the wolves if you ask me. The wolves are more decent
     
  9. Enmos Staff Member

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    I completely agree. Cull humans, not wolves. Humans are invasive pests.
     
  10. Enmos Staff Member

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    Awww

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    Humans fucked everything up, not the wolves.
     
  11. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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    I second that! *wields a machine gun*
     
  12. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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    Cool!!

    I just found a picture of one..

    http://www.wonderquest.com/wolf-coyote1.jpg
     
  13. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Usually?? I doubt it.
    I have no problem with a wolf hunting season, I just hope genetic diversity is kept up so that they don't fall prey to diseases like the Tasmanian Devil has.

    Do you know what is done with the wolf carcass? I don't know of any people that eat it.
     
  14. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    Huh. Wonder why and how that situation came about?

    Kinda funny to be critiquing a wolf's killing style and, heh, wastefulness--you know, the whole kettle and pot thing. Anyhow, I'm sure there'll be plenty of critters about to appreciate the leftover spoils.

    A violent and devastating plague for humans can't come soon enough as far as I'm concerned.
     
  15. PsychoTropicPuppy Bittersweet life? Valued Senior Member

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    And hunters decimated tons of species all over the planet just like that. And still do.

    Isn't it the rancher's responsibility to ensure that his sheep are safe, especially when he knows that there are predators living in his area? I think that would be the logical conclusion to draw from this knowledge, no?

    Sure I know what it looks like, and it's only logical that they've got no other option left. They don't have fangs of the kind a lion would have.

    Yeah, ever wondered how much people leave to rot? Yeah, keep on wondering.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2009
  16. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, kill the predator.
     
  17. milkweed Valued Senior Member

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    I have seen wolf kills (after the death). Few wildlife kills are pretty, so its not just wolves. This spring I helped gather evidence of wolf predation. We are pretty sure its one animal (an alpha female whos branched off and hasnt a pack yet), so shes taking what she can get.

    Yes, when a pack learns easy pickings, there is nothing you can do but take out the pack. They teach the young and its passed along. We have seen this with bears also.

    Part of the issue is the lack of awareness of the wildlife (talking about decimated elk/deer). There were plenty of deer/elk long before we took out the wolves. The elk/deer just havent learned to be aware of the wolves yet. That will come with time.

    As far as a hunting season on the wolves, its needed, but it has to be balanced with keeping a viable wolf population. But ranchers have to be appeased when they are hit by wolves or we will fall back to a 'shoot, shovel and shut up mentality'. I believe these states (idaho/montana/wyoming) have adopted a monetary compensation for wolf kills. Bummer is ranchers have to discover the kills in time for it to be verified, which can be difficult when the herd is out grazing for a month at a time.
     
  18. Enmos Staff Member

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    Will you be my friend ?

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  19. PsychoTropicPuppy Bittersweet life? Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah, I get the irony. But honestly, leaving your sheep alone, unprotected...in the midst of a region where there are predators..is like asking for it to happen. 270 sheep was it? That's a big number, meaning that the wolves had enough time to do that without being interrupted.
     
  20. Enmos Staff Member

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    Who are the predators ? Humans, right ?

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  21. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Well duh, herdsmen all over the world have had to find a way to deal with predators since long before modern weapons were available. The solution in the Middle East for three thousand years has been the Anatolian shepherd, a 120-lb dog that looks like a greyhound on steroids with a mastiff's head grafted on. They protect stock from wolves, jackals, cheetahs, hyenas and all the predators of the Old World. Bloodlines have been brought over from Turkey and they've been bred in the USA for about 30 years now. Ranchers all over the west are using them now. One Anatolian can take down a mountain lion or a wild boar, and run off a bear.

    American breeders have developed a few that are a little larger, around 150 lb, and send them to Africa as the "green" solution to lion depradation. Two of those suckers will protect a whole village from lions without killing them, making both the farmers and the environmentalists happy.

    We had an Anatolian for 11 years to protect our little dogs from bears and cougars. All the deer in the forest would jump the fence and spend the night in our yard with her.
    Wolves and coyotes are similar enough in appearance that for someone who doesn't live around them this picture doesn't really do justice to the hybridization. And it doesn't show the size; they're about 50% larger than a coyote, 60 lb rather than 40.
     
  22. dixonmassey Valued Senior Member

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    Wolves bite their prey to death before eating, that's how wolves kill - bite you to death. Wolves inside of a den full of sheep go berserk and kill way more of the sheep than they can eat. It's something in wolves brain, helpless prey without a chance to escape trigger kill instincts, wolves kill, kill and kill something that they don't do in the wild.
     
  23. Enmos Staff Member

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    Your point being ?
     

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