Without Religion

Discussion in 'Religion' started by Xelasnave.1947, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Was there a shortage of people needed for the legal profession? Why would they be recruiting someone who is 17 when I would suspect that the usual process involved law school graduates.

    I find this interesting. There is nothing like this in the U.S.
     
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  3. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    There were law school graduates but articles was quiet normal.
    The reason was you were paid little.
    I started on six pounds a week if I had worked for a bank I would have got double.
    You were a glorified go for.
    But you would get to do stuff the solicitors did not like doing such as debt collecting, and I was entrusted to draw memorandum and articles of association for a fire work company which was just hard tedious slog but it was a first and usually there were precedents for any company so one never had to start from scratch so I learnt the hard way.
    I ended up running the mortgage section which was routine but great experience.
    I negotiated a huge contract for my Jewish mate way past what he expected and I can say now I feel proud, it was me against some fancy corporate lawyers and I conned them with my play bumb approach.
    Also made that guy equivalent to six years income by getting land rezoned when everyone thought it impossible.
    I never went to court because you would just brief a young barrister but unlike all the others I would prepare briefs that all they had to do was read it and I gave them the case law etc.
    The game worked this way.
    On the court day both barristers would turn up expecting to settle out of court. I would set up my guy so he could go on. These were small matters.
    Barristers were happy to settle cause they got paid for the day but finished by morning tea.
    I would dig in my heels knowing my guy was prepared and demand we fight.
    Well I would get a very favorable settlement or go on and win.
    I also had made friends with the guys in the government insurance office so I knew who could make decisions up to what pay out.
    So I could negotiate in a range and settle without going to court.
    Most would not do that because it met less money but I extracted higher settlements and got a bit of a name.
    I gave it away because I ended up working for people and winning and I did not like them but well you know,your client, you have to do the right thing.
    Plus it got to the stage where the phone would ring at home and I would tremble.
    Just got too much and I won't do anything if I don't like what I am doing.
    I had signed up for a partnership but realised I did not want it.
    Money never was my motivation I just wanted to help folk and in real estate people could see I saw them as people not a pay day.
    In both law and real estate you stand out if you are genuine.
    So I have been lucky two careers and the life of a peasant.
    Done other things on the side promoting bike races even a movie which failed but I went thru the actions..the camera man shot thru with all the footage and I have not caught up with him to this day.
    So that's it.
    So I don't care about much or feel a need to one up anyone cause I think I have had a life full of things you could make a movie about.
    Very very lucky.
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016
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  5. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I had wanted to become a chemist but could not get into uni and picked up the paper saw the article clerk job applied and got it.
    I did not even know lawyers existed and sortta worked it out after I got the job.
    Alex
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    You mentioned that your father gave lectures at the law school. What was that all about (his lectures)?
    Is it hard to get into uni in Australia?
    Chemistry is an interesting subject as well I agree.
     
  8. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    He was a lawyer in the government but I don't know what he lectured on that was not his full time job and he only did it from time to time.
    We never really talked about work.
    Alex
     
  9. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Not then.
    I could only matriculate in Pharmacy at Sydney uni which had a limit and I did not make it.
    If you were into science you needed to go to Uni of NSW but I did not do advanced maths and could not get in for science.
    I was good at chemistry, I could do leaving certificate chemistry when in primary school, but my subjects were just wrong.

    I topped the leaving year in science 98.5% mark because I just loved it.

    But I am happy I did not do science particularly pharmacy as I doubt I would have had as full a life.

    I came from a country town my parents were simple folk and the teachers never saw me as gifted so I never got special treatment.

    I could beat everyone at chess all the teachers, my paintings would win first second and third in the country shows, that how I made pocket money, I designed an electric motor not knowing they existed, people just thought I was a strange kid, I could do leaving certificate chemistry in fifth class self taught, but no guidance or attention cause it was just a country town, you grew up to do what your father did.
    If its good enough for me its good enoughvfor the boy ..fortunately my dad was not like that but there was nothing to aspire to.

    When I told a teacher that I wanted to go to university he told me that being a fitter and turner was a better way to earn a living.

    So frankly I was lucky to make anything of myself.

    Alex
     
  10. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Interesting but I look at a pharmacy and its just a shop selling make up and shampoo.
    I am so glad that never happened.
    I look at the pharmacist when I go in and think thank goodness I missed doing that.
    Its like wanting to become a vet, you think it would be great helping animals but the reality is so different.
    Think of the animals you would have to put down cause they are not needed, racing dogs for one..I think vets have the highest suicide rate of any profession I can understand why.
    Both law and real estate you learn from others mistakes, you see folk who seem together but are not, I have helped people from all professions and you realise they have their work but nothing else..I can't explain it but as I said I am very lucky.
    Alex
     
  11. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    When I think of chemistry I don't think of it having to end in pharmacy but that certainly isn't an exciting profession. I never had any desire to be a vet since I do like animals.

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  12. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    You said you didn't even know that lawyers existed but your father was one? Occasionally you can be a little hard to follow.

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  13. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    Eye also think are spelling has gotten worse because wee use spell cheque two correct most of are words four us. Just a pity that it can knot always get it write.

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  14. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    He was qualified but had a government job.
    Alex
     
  15. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Besides Law School which involved lectures there was SAB and BAB.
    Solicitors Admission Board and Barristers Admission Board.
    All that was required was to sit for and pass the exams, certain text books were recommended but that was it no lectures, field trips, assignments you applied to sit, attended to sit the exam.
    Held six months apart for five years and you then applied to be admitted.
    There were many qualified barristers working in the public service and for corporations who never practiced law.
    Not all barristers appeared in court.
    I think the Chancellor of ANU (past or present not sure cause I am not really concerned) was a Solicitor from a small practice in England ..law qualification does not mean you are in court every day.
    Alex
     
  16. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Interesting. You have people here who went to law school but never bothered to pass the bar and therefore aren't licensed attorneys and you have some who are but who no longer practice law.

    To become an attorney however you have to go to a university for 4 years in whatever subject before you can go to law school and then law school is 3 more years. You can't become an attorney or practice law without doing any of that.

    You could work for a law firm and do some of the work that the attorneys don't necessarily need to do (help them in other words) and you would be a paralegal. You take classes to do that but I'm not sure where as it really isn't a university degree but maybe there are community colleges that provide those classes. I'm really not sure.

    Generally it's just university graduates that didn't continue on to law school who then take some additional classes.

    A long time ago it wasn't so strict and I think it was similar to what you are describing.
     
  17. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Remember I am talking of 40 years ago things may be very different now.

    Basically solicitors ran a law firm that handled, conveyancing (land transfer mortgages leases business sales) wills, probate, company formation, debt recovery and car accidents involving property or personal damage, defamation partnership matters, divorce and custody/access property settlement (I did all that).

    And Barrister would only go to court and usually on the matters above more so with accidents etc rarely over conveyancing.

    Only a solicitor could engage a barrister. A member of the public could not go and see a barrister off the street. The solicitor would "brief" the barrister and the barrister would "mark" the brief which meant he wrote his fee which the solicitor paid.

    Barristers wore a gown and a wig and look like they time travelled two centuries to get here.

    On the back of the gown is a small pocket as in times past the solicitor would slip the fee in this pocket such that the barrister did not see.

    There are top level barristers known as Queens Council if you use one you have to have a junior barrister as well.

    The judges are selected from the notable barristers.

    All the young barristers I used, now retired went on to be judges, so if I wanted to play the social games I would have had highly respected friends.

    A friend of mine a law clerk who I travelled to the city with most days became Premier of NSW.

    Alex
     
  18. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    You may notice I did not mention criminal law the firms I worked for did not handle criminal matters.
    If a client got into serious trouble and none did they would probably be referred to a firm specialising in criminal matters.
    Alex
     
  19. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Now what was the op about?
    Alex
     
  20. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    That a different system. I think your system comes from the UK where they have soliciters and barristers. Here, they are one and the same (and no wigs).

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    I think legal training under that system is more about lectures. Here it is based on case law. You brief the main points from established cases and learn that way.

    I think side tracking a thread is as interesting as the original thread particularly as the post count approaches 100.

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  21. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Not that you know.

    I try and contribute in an effort to help build traffic and talking about things in the past makes me appreciate the present.

    I think it is funny that I spend so much time in the religious section when I joined only because of my interest in science.
    Fortunately I know enough about science to know not to offer opinion whereas I feel no limitation in religion.
    I just hope folk do not take me too seriously.

    It is so dam (damn) hot here I feel sick.

    I am in the country now and the house has no air conditioning cause it is not on the grid same as my place in the bush so no air conditioner.

    But there is a magnificent dam here so I may go and sit there and do some drawings as it should be cooler.

    Alex
     

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