wireless energy transfer

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by bentley k. frog, Apr 23, 2004.

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  1. bentley k. frog Registered Member

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    I was wondering what are some ways to power a light with a power source spatially seperate from the light itself?

    I am also VERY, DIRELY! interested in the effects on the immediate environment with such wireless energy transfers, in comparison to current effects from common household appliances.

    If anybody could help me i'd be eternally thankful!

    -bentley
     
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  3. Nasor Valued Senior Member

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    You can light lightbulbs from a distance with microwaves. This probably wouldn't be very safe though. What effects are you refering to when you mention "current effects from common household appliances"?
     
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  5. bentley k. frog Registered Member

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    i wasn't thinking of sulfur bulbs, they would be too unsafe like you said

    i was thinking along the lines of a normal household light bulb connected up to a "receiver" with a transmitter somewhere else in the room.

    i guessed that you could do this somehow using electromagnetic waves, or magnetic waves. i suppose these would have a biological effect upon the environment surrounding, but most household appliances emit electromagnetic radiation, with little discomfort to the environment around.

    I have very little idea of what i'm talking about btw.
     
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  7. djkmoney Registered Senior Member

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    what I think you are thinking of was tested by Nikola Tesla, look into his research if you want. He was able to transfer some power i think like 300,000 watts some odd amount of miles. It was pretty cool, too bad he died and the gov stole all his research :bugeye: . Pretty cool guy though.
     
  8. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    If you were to take a normal television antenna ariel, it can build up a static electrical charge through receiving signals, it could be possible to take that charge an use it however once that power has been consumed it would need time to re-energise.

    You can guess from that the greater the amount of energy that you try to take from broadcasts, the greater the antenna you would need.

    You should also note that such antennas collecting static could build up the likelihood of being struck by lightening (theoretically). Which again you might be able to use, but you'd have to have a constant supply of storms.
     
  9. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    You would need a very powerful microwave antenna to get your light bulbs glowing. Lots of that power would be wasted as it escapes the house, not to mention you might find your self boiling.

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    You could bounce a laser at each bulb, a maser would not work as it cannot be focused enough, again read above.
     
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