Wildlife survivalist

Discussion in 'Science & Society' started by birch, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. birch Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,101
    I was on a hiking trail and realized i wouldn't be able to survive in the woods. I couldn't even be a caveman (no caves in vicinity and don't know how to build shelter) because i don't even know how to start a fire without matches or a lighter. if you don't know the basics of survival, doesn't that make you dumb?

    i was looking around and i didn't even know how to fashion a simple weapon or tool to even begin to utilize or transform any materials around me.

    for instance, how would you go about fashioning an axe to cut trees?

    would you need to first start a fire to melt down some ore? how would you even go about finding it or even recognize it? i can't even enter the iron age because i can't recognize iron in it's crude form, unless it was just lying around and that would still be trial and error.

    is befriending some deer and following them around or observing them one good strategy to learn what they eat, where they sleep or what type of den/shelter they build or use etc?

    i know to locate a water source is first priority such as a stream.

    on survival shows, they are given basic tools and supplies but i mean none whatsoever, it's just you and the wild elements.

    what would be your survival steps and strategy if you had no modern amenities or tools to begin?
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,237
    Water, shelter, food. My order of priorities. Maybe fire in there.

    Water obviously can be found in streams, but it can also be found in the form of dew in the morning. You can lick it off leaves. This won't be sustainable.
    For shelter, I'd try to climb a tree, and/or wrap myself in leaves, moss, etc.
    Food would be tricky. Bugs, I guess.
    I'd use rocks to fashion a crude spear.
    Making fire is good. I'm not sure how much success I'd have. Watch Tom Hanks' CastAway for some methods.

    You don't cut trees to survive. Way to labor-intensive. You must conserve your precious energy by balancing minimum needs with energy output.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,026
    You can get a survival app for your phone.
     
    DaveC426913 likes this.
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
    Rule one of being stranded in the wilderness: Don't leave the car.
     
    sideshowbob likes this.
  8. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,941
    It's difficult. Even primitives had their survival tools. Flint or fire bow and kindling. Just remember to bring everything you might need for several nights alone. I do that even if it's just a day hike.
     
  9. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
  10. birch Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,101
    i was curious what members would do if they didn't have any knowledge beforehand and no supplies or tools to begin. just you and your clothes on your back with the elements. imagine a scenario where there is no civilization to get to. you will have to start it for yourself since there is no one left.
     
  11. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
    Most people would be dead in a few weeks. Sooner if there were predators around. For example, you turn the corner on a trail and meet about 15 wolves. You have no weapons. What do you do?
     
    sideshowbob likes this.
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,237
    It is likely - in a typical wilderness - to run into a pack of 15 wolves over the course of less than a few weeks?
    I would say that is not likely.
     
  13. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,941
    Wolves are generally scared of people. And they cannot climb trees.

    Then why bother to survive?
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,237
    I would see it as a challenge of self-sufficiency.

    I think I would like to have a bamboo remote garage door opener to open my bamboo garage door to take out my bamboo SUV for a spin around the ersatz Blue Lagoon.
     
  15. birch Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,101
    bamboo would be great but not available. hunting would be difficult and dangerous unless it was close to your abode. setting traps would be safer.

    do you think you can..

    build a log cabin?

    make pottery and glass?

    grow and weave some type of cloth like linen?

    hunt wild game?

    do you know the steps and how to locate and transform the materials required?
     
  16. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,941
    You could probably give up on doing a lot of those things. When you have to work hard for your calories, you wouldn't waste them on unnecessary luxuries, like plates and beads. Clothing could be animal skins. I could make a crude cabin as long as I could make a stone axe.
     
  17. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,806
    Yes, but it would take years. First you have to make the tools to make the tools.
    Pottery - yes
    Glass - no
    Not without seeds.
    I've trapped wild birds before, so probably. But it's neither easy nor quick, so saying I could eat that way would be a stretch.
     
  18. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
    Really? Ever been to Yellowstone, or Minnesota?
     
  19. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
    You would die out there.
     
  20. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,998
    Don't sweat it if you run into a pack of wolves, afaik there are NO substantiated unprovoked attacks on adults from healthy wolves in North America.

    The chance of getting attacked by any predator is not likely. Exposure, dehydration and injury due to a fall are by far your greatest threats.

    Fire is a really good thing to have if you are in the wilderness. Making a fire with a bow and drill is relatively easy, I have done it many times. You can use a tree branch and shoe laces for the bow. Making the base is a bit more difficult if you do not have a knife but I have done it with just sharp rocks. The notch in the base is absolutely vital to make a fire!

    The most important thing is to stay hydrated. Make a big fire by a water source and wait to be rescued. You will be able to live for weeks without food (depending on how much 'reserve' you have in your body).

    If no one knows where you are - which should NEVER happen if you are going into the wilderness - then follow the nearest creek or river downstream. You will reach a road or civilization before too long. However, following a stream is way more difficult in the wilderness than following a stream in a populated area.

    edited to add: I got this book back in 1973 when it first came out and I found quite interesting and informative. I liked his attitude to survival in the wilderness.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
  21. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,941
    Most modern people would be likely to die eventually after being dropped into a wilderness area with nothing. I'm not that concerned. I did make it through Outward Bound wilderness survival school, but that's pretty basic.

    In fact, most native people wouldn't survive alone easily, that's why exile from the tribe was the ultimate punishment in many cultures. People need other people to survive.
     
  22. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    660
    You're wrong. Event was in Alaska, and the GRAD STUDENT ran from the pack when he saw them tracking him and his partner. The other guy stood still and the pack ran right around him.

    Bear and puma attacks are up in recent years.
     
  23. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,998
    Ok I looked it up. There have only been 4 wolf attacks in more than 120 years in North America. One of those was from a pack that had taking to eating the garbage from the camp and had associated food with people. I am not counting rabid or captive wolves. So again, I would consider it extremely lucky to see wolves and not something to be scared of.

    A fatal attack from a deer is more likely than an attack from a wolf.

    Yep, and your chances of being involved in an attack is about the same as winning the lottery, so relax.

    So like I said, the most dangerous aspect of being lost in the woods is dehydration, exposure or injury from a fall.
     

Share This Page