Why if the photon is a particle crosses the glass?

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience Archive' started by victorespinoza, May 21, 2013.

  1. Why if the photon is a particle crosses the glass?

    I don't understand.
     
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  3. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Maybe this will help you to understand - a photon is not a particle.

    Your welcome!

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  5. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

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    To get to the other side.
     
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  7. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Because it is both a particle and a wave. When crossing another medium it is most useful to think of it as a wave.
     
  8. arauca Banned Banned

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    I am not sure science knows what it is (magic ) when is convenient it is a particle and when is not convenient then is called a wave ,
    Question does a wave shatters glass or does a particle shatters the glass ?
     
  9. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    The photon is a wavelet at the moment it strikes the glass. It interacts. It annihilates, giving up its energy to an electron in the crystalline silicon, and that energy is transmitted to the opposite surface, where the process reverts and a new photon is created which subsequently exits, giving the illusion that the photon has passed through the glass.
     
  10. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    It's a wave when it's radiating.
     
  11. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

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    Yes.
     
  12. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Actually it is always both.

    Neither.
     
  13. Lakon Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for the clear (excuse the pun) answer. I would have thought that to be the case. That in itself, however, is also fascinationg. Imagine a very clear, say 2" sheet of glass. The light would pass through it almost as if it wasn't there. It hits the glass and is re-created at the other side as though it wasn't there. Fascinating!
     

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