Why can we not say Water exist in 4 phases

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by timojin, Dec 16, 2015.

  1. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    Mr river tell this wise guys some solids are liquids .
     
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  3. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    [QUOTE="DaveC426913, post: 3368978, m".

    Anything looks deep until you break out the reading glasses, learn how it actually works, and can ask constructive questions. You should do this.[/QUOTE]
    Carefull your will not break they will spill . glass is liquid.
     
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  5. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Glass is not a liquid. Glass is an amorphous solid.
     
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  7. timojin Valued Senior Member

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  8. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    LIQUID DOES NOT HAVE A TRANSITION TEMPERATURE.
     
  9. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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  10. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    There is a lot of confusion around glass. There are even urban legends that very old glass windows are thicker at the bottom because the glass flowed over time. Not true at all.
    I have a pretty good source of information, my wife is a glass technologist.
     
  11. timojin Valued Senior Member

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  12. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Glass is a solid at room temperature. The glass transition temperature or softening point of pure SiO2 glass is 2300 F.
     
  13. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    I thought glass was a very viscous liquid . I know what glass transition temperature is I used to work with polymers and characterizing them and Tg. was one of the analysis, I am also somehow familiar on how to momowe the Tg. in polymers. Look guy I just wanted to throw a monkey wrench the argument " liquid "
     
  14. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Glass is an amorphous solid obviously.

    Like river, do you also accept ghosts, goblins, Bigfoot, UFO's of Alien origins as fact?

    Why?
    If you were fair dinkum, why not accept the answer on its merits?
    Don't bother answering. :shrug:
     
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    And SciAm has an (old) article on it:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-fiction-glass-liquid/
     
  16. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    That's fine, you just need to look somewhere else besides silica based glasses for your example. I am just supporting the wife's position.
     
  17. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    What "argument "liquid""?

    The issue that river cannot seem to grasp is that the liquid state is intrinsically a bulk property of an assembly of molecules, atoms or ions. The condensed states of matter (liquid and solid) only arise due to attractions between molecules, atoms or ion. Therefore, talking, as he or she has tried to do, about an isolated molecule, atom or ion being in the liquid state is quite meaningless.

    Dave's posts, like mine in the old thread I linked to, have tried to address this point (though apparently without success, insofar as river's understanding of it is concerned). Your example of an amorphous solid like glass is not relevant to the point at all.

    But, although your intervention was a red herring, the ensuing discussion has not been without interest. For example I thought the Wiki link, on how the glass transition temperature can be related to the transition in specific heat capacity, was interesting.
     
  18. river Valued Senior Member

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    Exchemist

    Oh ; I have grasp this concept of this " bulk " or a critical mass aggregate of water molecules in order to manifest ; this liquid called water.

    But You have not grasped ; exchemist ; is the fact that ; in order to produce the whole ; a drop of water ; must be inside or outside each atom of H and O .

    Since both atoms become a liquid at extremely low temps.

    Now the challenge is to make each atom of both H And O do so , individually .
     
  19. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    How exacly does an atom become a liquid?
     
  20. river Valued Senior Member

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    Thats the question . that is the essense of my investigation . and that investigation will bring forth knowledge .
     
  21. river Valued Senior Member

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    You need find a lab. That can isolate ; both a H atom and O atom ; and then take both down to the liquid form of both. Seperately.
     
  22. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    The liquid form of an individual atom? That doesn't even make sense.
     
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  23. river Valued Senior Member

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    Doesn't ?

    The aggregate is the manifestion of the individual atom. And what it is doing.
     

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