What is different about a brain when you have a good but NOT perfect memory?

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by Maximum7, Sep 10, 2021.

  1. Maximum7 Registered Member

    Messages:
    17
    I am 28 years old and I have an excellent memory. As a child; I was able to easily recall information in school so I always did well in history. I also could read a book quickly and be able to recall all the details of a plot years later. I could memorize something pretty well on the first try and if I did something in mass repetition I never forgot it. I have OCD so I constantly rehearse memories in my mind; but there are many memories I haven’t “touched” in years and come back to me involuntarily or when I go “digging”. I remember details of conversations I’ve had decades ago with various people and sometimes negative memories that I recall feel so vivid that I almost feel sad or angry again. I also remember how I felt at some times in my past and sometimes even the details of dreams I’ve had come back to me. It’s rare but it occassionally happens. Also when I am trying to fall asleep at night; my mind likes to entertain itself by flooding me with memories. Almost like it’s watching a movie. Many have suspected I am on the autism spectrum as well, but I feel very strong emotional feelings for others so I am high functioning autism if anything. Now I only have an average IQ and I suck at math. I also do NOT have total recall. There are things I do forget both long term and short term but the fact that I remember how I felt 20 years ago about a certain thing or situation leads me to believe my memory is better because of something other than my OCD and autism. I know that people with Hyperthymesia have an enlarged caudate nucleus and temporal lobe. What is different about my brain because I have a pretty good memory?
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,219
    Your brain has less electrical signals and neurons don’t move as often as someone with a photographic memory.

    there are exercises that you can do to boost your memory like placing a certain thing on a finger or a toe in order to remember it later.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. mathman Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,889
    Your post would be easier to approach if you used paragraphs.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,353
    "Photographic memory" isn't a think. That's not how the brain works.
     
  8. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,353
    There is probably nothing different, in this regard, about your brain because you have "pretty good" memory. Most people have pretty good memory unless there is something causing that to decline.

    If you are highly focused, in general, then you apply that to everything including memory.
     
  9. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    It may behoove you to read something about a subject dear to my heart but I am forbidden to mention.

    And wholly inappropriately so, I may add.

    What the hell, truth will out one way or another. No need to beat around the bush.

    Pyramidal Neurons (consisting of microtubules) have been acknowledged and proven to be the seat of memories.

    p.s. You may find it in the subforum; pseudoscience
    "Is consciousness to be found in quantum processes in microtubules?"
    See post #2102 to get you started.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2021
  10. iceaura Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    30,992
    Neurons do not "consist of" microtubules.
    Memories are not "seated" in neurons of any kind.
    A memory is a behavior - remembering is something neurons (acting in consort with tens of thousands of other neurons), do. You can't find a memory inside a neuron, any more than you can find a stride inside someone's leg.
     
    exchemist likes this.
  11. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,117
    You are saying that a neuron is only part and not the whole?
     
  12. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    Hint: Alzheimers disease (loss of memory) is due to "microtubule catastrophe".

    See; "Is consciousness to be found in Microtubules" in Pseudoscience sub-forum.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,504
    I'm 69 and I can remember things that didn't happen.

    I went to a one-room country school for part of Grade One (there was no Kindergarten). The school was originally built around 1927 (?). In 1954 (when I was 2) they built a new school next to it and moved the old school away. I have a photograph of the two schools side by side, taken during the few months when they were side by side.

    The punch line is: I have no memory whatsoever of the new school - i.e. the one I attended. All of my memories are of the old school (reminder: I was 2 when they moved it away).

    And every time I tell that story, it reinforces my memory of the story.
     
  14. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
  15. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    Right, just like insulated electrical wires do not consist of bundled copper wires.
     
  16. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,683
    Nerve impulses are conducted down the axon as a wave of polarisation and depolarisation, transmitted by the opening and closing of successive ion channels, which allow cations Na+ and K+ to flow across the cell membrane in a "Mexican wave" fashion.

    Microtubules play no role in this process, so far as I can see. And the analogy with the conductors in a cable seems to be wholly misplaced. The conduction, such as it is, is in the form of currents of ions, perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the polarisation wave.

    Or, to put it another way, Write4U is talking out of his arse, again.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    Kristoffer likes this.
  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    That is correct, but these nerve impulses do not travel on the myelin exterior of the axon but on the inside, and inside the axon are the microtubules , bundles of them just like the copper wire bundles make up the interior of an insulated electric wire.

    Ken Saladin, Former professor of histology (microscopic anatomy)
    Answered November 30, 2019
    Here are a few depictions of this cytoskeletal architecture. cytoskeleton = microtubules.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    Ken Saladin , Quora
    And you are eating my shit once again. All you had to do is "listen" but alas, the Dunning -Kruger effect has struck once again.

    It is the microtubules inside the axons that do the transporting. It is the microtubules that provide the polarization
    You have no clue as to what you are talking about.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    1. The building blocks of microtubules are alpha (α) and beta (β) tubulin monomers, which assemble as heterodimers. 2. These tubulin heterodimers then form linear protofilaments. 3. Protofilaments assemble into a hollow cylinders to form microtubules. The motor proteins kinesin and dynein transport vesicles, organelles, and substances along microtubules.

    https://www.mechanobio.info/cytoskeleton-dynamics/what-is-the-cytoskeleton/what-are-microtubules/
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2021
  18. Hercules Rockefeller Beatings will continue until morale improves. Moderator

    Messages:
    2,803
    Exactly. It’s the plasma membranes of axons and dendrites that propagate electrical impulses, not the microtubules.

    Correct again.
     
  19. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    Wrong twice. The cadavers just keep piling up.
     
  20. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    Show me a picture of the interior of a dendrite and I'll believe you. You may want to check out post #11

    p.s. do you know what a plasma membrane is and where it is located?
     
  21. iceaura Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    30,992
    They often don't - but that analogy misleads regardless. Many people will overlook the manner in which a metal wire carries electrical current, and thereby miss whatever information that analogy provides.

    One can help avoid misleading people by keeping in mind the fact that a neuron is a cell, not a wire. A better choice for simplistic analogies might be a self-organizing collection of capacitors, batteries, transistors, chemical storage units, and a few dozen other pieces of machinery all packaged in a leaky bag with tens of thousands of other bags similar and different.
    According to your quoted links the microtubules help guide the transport of - and I quote your link, as bolded by you - " - - - the two-way traffic of organelles and molecular freight between the soma and the axon tips."
    The microtubules guide and direct the comparatively slow physical transport of molecular freight. Other mechanisms and structures do the actual transporting, as guided. All that is much slower than the electrical impulses the structure supports and guides.


    But that is secondary. Primarily, centrally: There are no memories inside neurons, for basically the same reason there are no fists inside fingers or blinks inside eyelids.
     
  22. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542
    The analogy is correct.
    Axons and dendrites are the connecting wires between cells "Finally, many axons are covered with a special insulating substance called myelin, which helps them convey the nerve impulse rapidly. Myelin is never found on dendrites."
    Not quite. The microtubule centrosome and centrioles would be a better analogy to electronic organizing centers.
    Dendrites and axons are very much the wires that connect neurons to each other. Consider that synapses at the end of axons are the terminal ends of microtubule bundles. The synapses are analogous to electrical switches between the neural axons.
    Synapses
    The brain alone contains some 85 billion neural cells and 125 trillion synapses. This is just one type of neural cell of the brain

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    For instance, specialized neurons called Purkinje cells are found in a region of the brain known as the cerebellum. Purkinje cells have a highly complex dendritic tree that allows them to receive – and integrate – an enormous number of synaptic inputs, as shown above. Other types of neurons in the cerebellum can also be recognized by their distinctive shapes.
    [See a diagram of other cerebellum cell types]
    https://www.khanacademy.org/science...m/a/overview-of-neuron-structure-and-function

    As shown previously dendrites contain microtubules. Can you count 'em?
    Partially correct. The chemical transport function has its physical limitations, but that is not all MT do.

    Bundles of Brain Microtubules Generate Electrical Oscillations

    Abstract

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30453-2
    Actually it has pretty well been established that pyramidal neurons (filled with microtubules) are the warehousing of data.

    Pyramidal neurons
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2021
  23. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,542

Share This Page