what happens if?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Beaconator, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,240
    You would have an iron enclosed chemistry set.
     
    DaveC426913 likes this.
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,311
    Indeed!

    One can say iron is overkill. Many of us who grew up in the 70s had the elements enclosed in nothing but a cardboard box!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    TabbyStar and RainbowSingularity like this.
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    I don think more detail is necessary...
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,199
    So according to you, gold should be more reactive than iron. And helium should be more reactive than, say, potassium.

    I see.
     
  8. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    I'm saying with respect to iron hydrogen is more reactive than gold. Using iron as a standard for reactivity.
     
  9. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,163
    omg
    im in love !
     
    TabbyStar likes this.
  10. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,163
    you have not said how many microns thick the iron is supposed to be.
     
  11. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    It wouldn't be measured in microns... More like inches. I wouldn't want to be mixing chemicals in a Trojan condom and have the iron impregnated.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,199
    Are you saying gold is more or less reactive than iron?
     
  13. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,163
    i just learnt i am wasting my time interacting with you.
     
  14. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    I'm saying a scale with iron as a standard might be more accurate to measure reactivity with respect to the original experiment.
     
  15. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    H+He+Li+Be+B+C+N+O+F+Ne+Na+Be+Al+Si+P+S+Cl+Ar+K+Ca+Sc+Ti+V+ Cr+Mn+ 26 Fe=?
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,311
    I confess, I'm fascinated with this thread.

    I'm not not contributing; I'm simply waiting for a moment, even the smallest of windows, where it intersects - however fleetingly - with reality.
     
  17. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,627
    If you have enough H and O, you'll get a dust cloud of Li, Be, B, C, Ne, Na, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, etc.
     
  18. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,462
    You don't need any of that.

    Just check out the Urey-Miller experiment and see millions of chemical reactions take place.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller–Urey_experiment
     
  19. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,163
    the room for interpretation leeway is so large its like a tarot card scam in thread form.
    however...
    maybe shim means all elements being simultaneously bonded with iron...

    that would require a quantum computer and some very expensive programming for something that would have possibly vastly varying results.
    chaos theory would probably need to be used as an algorithm to formulate probable systemic confluence.

    my brain tells me it would end up being 80% computer generated art.
     
  20. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    733
    HF+ BeO+ BN+LiCl+MgS+AlP+SiC+FeNa+FeK+FeCa+FeSc+FeTi+ FeV+FeCr+FeMn+18Fe+He+Ne+Ar
     
  21. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,462
    If that is chemically "allowed" at all. You cannot just throw a bunch of chemicals together and expect some kind of orderly processto ensue.

    Chemistry follows very specific "rules", especially when there is a multitude of chemicals present.

    That where evolution starts.
     
  22. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,163
    my attention has been mused by the point at which gravity takes over and engages in the reactive process.

    does the gravitational field intrinsically change the nature of the elements to a point where it presents a different physical property of the core attribute ?

    i.e/e.g the surface of the sun
     
  23. Write4U Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,462
    I would hazard that all significant external influences such as gravity, pressure, temperature,
    affect chemical reactions,

    Interestingly, one can find oil but also vinegar in places where the earth's crust has subducted thousand of feet down into the interior.

    And I just ran across this big little marvel of natural self-organization.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    RainbowSingularity likes this.

Share This Page