what happens if?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Beaconator, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    If I were to surround every element up to iron in an iron shell?
     
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    You mean in individually? Or all in a bunch?
     
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  5. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    If they are all together, you would get a rapid exothermic reaction, generating a lot of oxides and halides. Basically the elements on the right of the p-block of the Periodic Table would react with the others, preferentially those on the left.

    If you mean each element individually, then we would need to go through each combination with iron in turn. This would take too long for me to bother with it.
     
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  7. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    All in a bunch without atmosphere.
     
  8. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    So we don't know how this bunch would react with its shell. Could the heat from the bunch be withstood from an iron casing?
     
  9. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    Is this about the sun?

    Gravity, nuclear fusion and elements and stuff?
     
  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    With a moment's thought, I'm sure you will realize what the problem is with this question, and what the only possible response can be.
     
  11. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    The Brady bunch the Brady bunch, that's the way we became the Brady bunch.
     
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    (The response is: how thick?)
     
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  13. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    810
    How much volume would the bunch yield?

    How much wood coulda wood chuck...

    All these questions and no trial and answer questions.
     
  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Yes I was wondering that, in relation to this thread more generally......
     
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  15. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    It's to do with relative reaction rates (and thermodynamics). The rate at which oxygen and the halogens, for example, would react with alkali and alkaline earth metals would greatly exceed that at which they would react with Fe. The ultimate reaction products would obviously depend on how much of each element was present, but the first things to happen would be the most reactive combinations reacting to produce relatively inert compounds, and then what was left would react in some way. Fe is not that high up the reactivity series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactivity_series
     
  16. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    That chart sucks. Lets make a better one
     
  17. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Go on then. This could be funny.
     
  18. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    I can testify to the reactivity of sodium. Of the two explosions I was involved in at school, I only caused one, and that was with sodium. (Tiny sodium crumbs down the drain --> minor poof.)
     
  19. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Separating oxygen and hydrogen faster than a microwave. Lol lol
     
  20. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    What I'm talking about is very dangerous, but the reward is insurmountable.

    I would hypothesize the further away from iron a material lies on the periodic table the more reactive in general.

    While the upheld belief measures reactivity with atmospheric bias as well as other forms of bias.
     
  21. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Yeah I can do this in my lifetime.
     
  22. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    810
    You could separate reactive elements between iron and start the vacvac and see how long or at what pressure it takes for them to react.
     
  23. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    some elements would react with each other.
    given their mass effect to create their own gravity...
    the larger the iron mass the greater the gravity effect on all of the contents.

    however...
    iron is very conductive
    space weather from the sun is constant and varied.
    sometimes there is massive amounts of solar wind.
    the iron would become electrically charged by the solar wind which would probably ignite the contents like a high pressure oven.

    the main issue you may need to look at is
    some elements have no real different reaction in tiny amounts.

    from what i can tell, not being a scientist... there is no current planetary/geophysical body that comes close to your idea.
    Gas giants are possibly the closest aside from earth.

    you may wish to get more detailed to get a better precision of answer for your question.
     

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