What can i expect after i graduate...

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by iconex, Jun 10, 2010.

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  1. iconex Registered Member

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    What can i expect after i graduate a degree of BS Mechanical Engineering, jobs? opportunities? salary? workplace? need help from the experts =) thanks!
     
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  3. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    You could probably find a job in any corporation that develops physical products.
     
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  5. soullust Registered Senior Member

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    Move to Alberta Canada, you will make minimum 100 k a year starting off.
     
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  7. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    You will find many oppotunities awaiting you from many businesses,just pick the best one don't jump at the first one.
     
  8. Kennyc Registered Senior Member

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  9. kmguru Staff Member

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    Do some serious networking. As a young person, you have better chance of getting a job than an unemployed middle agers. CFOs do not care about experience, they count head and how much they pay.
     
  10. superstring01 Moderator

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    Well. . . .

    Don't take my word for it, talk to the few people here for whom I've written resume's.

    My advice/comments are as follows:
    • First off, great choice in education and career fields. I mean it. You picked one of the best, most secure fields in any nation. This, after medicine, is the job path that I recommend MOST for younglings who are good in the sciences (especially math). [note: where do you live?]
    • Most nations protect certain segments of the engineering industry for national security. Western nations, and especially the USA, do this with aplomb. If you live here in the USA, your chances at a high paying job are even GREATER due to the high need for American born engineers to work for various defense/security contractors.
    • You need to continue your education. I mean it. Yeah. You can do what you want and I'm not the boss of you, but this is important shit. You're a big boy/girl and can make your own decision, but the two extra years--and the masters under your belt--equals almost a fifty percent increase in wages over the long haul, increased promotability, and a nearly impervious job security to keep your mind cool and relaxed for the next few decades. Calculated out, that is--conservatively--another million dollars until you retire (EARLY!!!) at the young age of 55 (which, coincidentally, you will be able afford since you've made so much and banked so much due to your smart decision to get your masters degree). You've made it this far, might as well go for the [US]$100,000 starting salary and keys to the executive pissers. [note: though, you may need to move to a different place in your home nation, the jobs will most certainly be there]
    • When you retire at 55, you can work part time and have your pick of the litter when it comes to jobs, making 1/3 of what you made before, working 1/4 the time that you worked before, in a job that is fun and entertaining (parks and recreation, teaching, whatever), but busy enough to allow you to stay active, but free enough to give you weeks (or months) away from home for extended vacations to warm places. This can just be "mad" money, because your bills are paid and your IRA, stock portfolio and 401k/403b (if you're American) cover the bulk of your living expenses.
    • If you insist on going to work now (which, if you do, mind you, I don't begrudge you) you still can expect to do better than most of your comrades wherever you live. If this is your path, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, hire a personal financial consultant. I use Ameriprise, but Mercer, Prudential, Edward Jones are solid names. Your local bank and possibly your auto insurer may offer these services too. But whatever you do, start saving now, 'cause no matter where you live, a MINIMUM of 15% of your income should go directly into retirement/emergency fund savings. How much will that $15,000 be worth when you retire? More than $110,000 (and that's at an average rate of 7% which is less than the 10.1% average from 1970 to 2010 for a S&P500 company).
    • Find someone to write a resume for you. It makes the difference between getting and not getting the interview.
    '

    ~String
     
  11. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    I second that. An ex colleague of mine spent a day on a course learning how to sell himself as an IT contractor. He then rewrote my CV (resume) for me using the tips they'd given him. He got his contract job, and shortly after, using my new CV, I got a new job with a near 50% pay increase.
     
  12. iconex Registered Member

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    Whoa! I really appreciated your long yet fully detailed advise! Your advise pushed me to grasp my degree tightly, I really like what you said (i.e. "First off, great choice in education and career fields. I mean it. You picked one of the best, most secure fields in any nation."), unfortunately i think some of you advises (not all) are not applicable to me, since i'm not living in north america, i live in the Philippines. I am not also a graduate student, I posted this question to have an idea what will be my lifeline pursuing BSME degree, at June 15, it will be my first day at college. =P My plan is to take the ME Board Exam at my place and Pass it (pray for me =)) and obtain a 3 years working experience in order for me to venture out abroad especially in the countries of North America/Europe, I hope my ambitions will make me a lot of money to live a life i want =), hope you can help me since i'm not from america =(
     
  13. superstring01 Moderator

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    Oh. Don't worry. As an Asian within--say--the USA, you are part of an elite group of people who already dominate the science and engineering fields here in the States. Secure jobs. Lots of them. OH, and they pay really well. You just won't be able to work in some of the more sensitive defense areas. But who cares. It's only fraction of all the engineering jobs available.

    ~String
     
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