Was the modern man white ?

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by timojin, Jul 5, 2017.

  1. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    It’s a sex-laced mystery. If modern humans didn’t reach Europe until about 60,000 years ago, how has DNA from them turned up in a Neanderthal fossil in Germany from 124,000 years ago? The answer seems to be that there was a previous migration of early humans – more than 219,000 years ago. One that we’re only just starting to reveal from piecemeal evidence that is DNA extracted from fossilised bones. The story, as far as we knew it, was that the ancestors of modern humans diverged from Neanderthals and Denisovans between 550,000 and 765,000 years ago. While Neanderthals and Denisovans inhabited Eurasia, modern humans stayed in Africa until about 60,000 years ago. Then they entered Europe, too. .

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/80d3ef66-a93c-37c3-853f-2f2fa55749c8/ss_we-may-have-mated-with.html
     
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  3. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    And in all this interesting evolutionary biology, your major concern is what color skin they had?
     
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  5. timojin Valued Senior Member

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  7. timojin Valued Senior Member

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  8. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    That is part of evolution , because we reale don't know if Neanderthal man have something to do when he moved into Africa and spread his seed to produce a modern man .
     
  9. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Albino?
     
  10. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    It is my guess that the original Homo Sapiens in Africa were black to protect then from excessive sun burn.

    It would seem that lighter skin evolved when Homo Sapiens migrated to temperate climates.

    In temperate climates dark skin prevented sunshine from creating some vitamin (I think D) from being induced
     
  11. Michael 345 Valued Senior Member

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    So was rainbow coloured????

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  12. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    Would that imply the Sami people should have blond hair, since that culture ia around 8000 years in the northern area.?
     
  13. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    It have crossed my mind many times. The blacks in Africa segregate the Albino,
     
  14. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    No.
    The Sami acquire vitamin D from diet - as do most other successful colonizers of high latitudes, usually by coastal seafood foraging.
     
  15. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    Well I see the Spaniard Moroccan Canary Islands did not obtain enough vitamin D , so the hair got only straighten and the color lighten , but nos as light as the northern.
     
  16. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    None of the current human inhabitants of the Canary Islands evolved in place.
     
  17. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    I know they did not evolve there. Prior the Spaniards conquered the islands , the Islands vere inhabitaded, by some culture that was not black, and the culture is relatively old.
     
  18. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Let us assume that heidelbergensis evolved at about 40 degrees north latitude or north of there.
    Could he then not also have been pale skinned, redheaded and blue eyed, much like his neanderthal spawn?
     
  19. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    No human who ever inhabited the Canary Islands evolved there.
    There is no "culture that is black".
     
  20. Bells Staff Member

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    For goodness sakes!

    How many of these threads do you have to start that is basically the exact same subject as all the other ones and making the same baseless assumption and dealing with the same hang-up you have about skin colour?

    The answer is still exactly the same as the from the previous thread.. No, Neanderthal did not "produce modern man". Homo sapiens evolved in Africa. There was a lot of interbreeding events with other hominids in Africa.. They them migrated out of Africa, and bred with other hominid species that came before them.. Not just Neanderthals, but Denisovan's and probably other yet unknown hominid species.

    White skin appeared in Europe around 8,000 years ago. Long after the extinction of Neanderthals. Prior to that, Homo sapiens in Europe had dark to black skin.

    Neanderthals ranged from pale to dark skin. Not all had red hair, nor were all blue eyed. In fact, they were as varied as Homo sapiens are. One would assume that their ancestors were also just as varied.

    And the red hair that Homo sapiens have, is not from Neanderthals.

    The genetic mutation that gave Neanderthals their fiery locks cannot be found in modern humans.

    Nowadays, people with red hair do have a mutation in the same gene, MCR1, but it's a different mutation.

    What's more, the Altai Neanderthal did not have the red-haired mutation. This hints that, just like us, Neanderthals had more than one hair colour.

    As for blue eyes..

    That, like white skin, also appeared much later after Neanderthals became extinct..

    New research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today.


    More here:

    https://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/...eals-origins-of-blue-eyes-lactose-intolerance

    http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/all-blue-eyed-people-have-common-ancestor-0/

    Why would they have blonde hair?

    You do realise that blonde hair is not really connected to where people live, right? That it is a genetic mutation and natural blonde hair has different mutations in different parts of the world? For example, the blonde haired Solomon Islanders in the Pacific Ocean, along with Indigenous Australians, have blonde hair and some even have bright blue eyes.. The blonde hair is caused by a completely different mutation than the blond hair found in Europeans..

    While blue eyes all share a link to one common ancestor not that long ago, blonde hair in the South Pacific was from a different mutation to that of European blonde hair and is localised to the region and is actually quite pervasive in the region, particularly in the Solomon Islands.. And absolutely nothing to do with Europeans or the climate.
     
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  21. The God Valued Senior Member

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    As per you who is modern man? When was he born? Where was he born? What was the climatic conditions of the place where he was born? What was the DNA profile of his parents? Answers to these questions will answer the OP.
     
  22. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Virtually all paleontologists find overwhelming evidence that the first Homo sapiens appeared in south and/or central Africa, whereas the Neanderthals first appeared to the northeast of that region, somewhere around what is now Turkey and its neighbors. This is why the two waves of closely-related hominids arrived in Europe at quite different times. The Neanderthals were already on Europe's doorstep, and set out to populate the entire continent, while the sapiens were rather content with their homes in Africa and saw no pressing reason to leave.

    By the time the Sapiens decided to move north, Europe had a thriving Neanderthal population. Food was still more-or-less abundant, so there was no pressing need for the two populations to fight over resources. The first evidence of a permanent Sapiens community in Europe is all the way over in what is now France, only about one mountain range from the Atlantic seashore.

    This was the Cro-Magnon cave, and we still identify those first colonists as the "Cro-Magnon people," even though thousands of their relatives were already finding migration routes from the Middle East into Europe, establishing new homelands all over the continent.

    As you surely know, due to the abundance of prey animals there was plenty of food for both communities, and therefore there was little reason for them to fight. In fact each species had characteristics that the other lacked, which made it quite reasonable for them to cooperate. For example, the Neanderthals were somewhat stronger and had more endurance, making them perfect partners on a hunting expedition. However, because their arms were not articulated the same way as ours, they were incapable of using a bow and arrow. Furthermore, we Sapiens people, as you surely know from experience, are buoyant, which makes it easy for us to go fishing, or even to swim around in a river or lake, catching fish with nets or spears. Neanderthals can't do that.

    As the earth warmed, the large, slow-moving prey animals that Neanderthals could bring down began to vanish, replaced by much smaller, faster animals who came across from Europe with the Homo sapiens. By now, the Neanderthals weren't quite able to carry their weight in the dual-species community. There were no wars between the two species, but the Neanderthal population began to shrink. No one knows when the last Neanderthal was buried, but that event did indeed occur.

    Of course, as we all know, all humans whose ancestors did not come from central or southern Africa have about 5% Neanderthal DNA. This is further evidence of the cordial relationship the two species maintained for thousands of years.
     
  23. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    It is commonly assumed that neanderthals and denisovans evolved from heidelbergensis outside of Africa.(who evolved from erectus)---------(also outside of africa?)
    Accurate?
    Why then is it also assumed that heidelbergensis then went to africa so that sapiens-sapiens could then evolve from heidelbergensis in Africa?
    Is this an attempt to maintain the "out of africa" hypothesis without direct evidence?
    Or............................?
     

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