Unknown reactions

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Xmo1, Nov 27, 2015.

  1. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    How many combinations of elements and forces are left to combine, where the outcomes are unknown or not described?
     
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  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Forces? What do you mean by that?
     
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  5. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Saying that my question is not a good one, I don't know. Maybe nine forces that cause change. Are there common forces used in the testing of combinations of elements? Suppose I just disregard the forces, and treat them as if they are accelerating or inhibiting forces, and don't have any net effect on the common interaction of elements. Are there too many possible combinations to be tested over a century or two? Have computer simulations tested all possible combinations? What is the variance between simulations and 'real' testing outcomes? I'm guessing (not being a chemist, and not having access to professional journals) that computer sims are advanced enough these days to make accurate predictions. Has everything been tested, or what percentage is not tested, or cannot be tested? Personally, I have no clue about the answer, and would like some baseline of information.
     
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  7. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    What do you mean by 9 forces?
     
  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I am still in the dark as to what you mean by "forces" in this context, especially when you speak of nine forces that cause change. Where do you get this number from? If you mean the forces that govern chemical behaviour, they are all manifestations of one force, the electromagnetic force, because chemistry is really the science of how electrons behave in atoms. Chemical bonding arises from how electrons respond to the shape and strength of the combined electric field from two (or more) atomic nuclei brought together. (Magnetic effects also arise, due to the rotary motion of electrons -intrinsic spin or orbital motion about the nucleus.)

    To answer your question about possible combinations of elements, the number of permutations is inexhaustible. New molecules and giant structures are being discovered all the time.

    Regarding computer simulations, it is actually not possible to predict all possible chemical processes by simulation. Our models of the atom do not manage to capture all the effects of interactions, though quite a lot can be predicted, qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. If you care to read here about the "three body problem", you may being to see why this is so: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-body_problem It is very hard to get analytically exact solutions for even the hydrogen molecule ion, which has only 2 protons and one electron! By the time you get to the compounds of an atom such as, say, sulphur, with 16 electrons, you are forced to make a series of considerable approximations to get anywhere at all with modelling it. In this sense, chemistry is unlike physics - the messy complexity of reality intrudes too much.
     
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